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Coaching for Excellence Resources List

Deliverable Design a process to implement a change management initiative that focuses on coaching for professional improvement and results. The process would include recommendation on how this would impact a performance-based merit increase compensation system.

Executive Sponsors: Ken Nordhoff, City Manager; Valerie Barone, Asst. City Manager, City of Walnut Creek. Submitted by: Fran Robustelli, Asst. City Manager; City of Walnut Creek.

Leadership Team: Bob Atlas; Tonya Gilmore; Frank Luna; Josie London; Kristin Pollot; Michele Rodriguez; Ryan Pursley; Tim Nielsen.

Research Materials:

Articles

The Five Conversations Framework: An Alternative Approach to Appraisals. MindTools.com February 2, 2016.

The Corporate Kabuki of Performance Reviews. The Washington Post. February 14, 2013. https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/on-leadership/the-corporate-kabuki-of-performance-reviews/2013/02/14/59b60e86-7624-11e2-aa12-e6cf1d31106b_story.html

The Speed of Trust. Executive Book Summaries. November 2006.

Here’s what Millennials Want from their Performance Reviews. Rob Hernandez. Fast Company & Inc. 2016. http://www.fastcompany.com/3052988/the-future-of-work/heres-what-millennials-want-from-their-performance-reviews

Effectives of Externally Mediated Rewards on Intrinsic Motivation. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 1971. http://www.quilageo.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/fn103.Deci_.pdf

Kill Your Performance Ratings. David Rock. Strategy and Business. Autumn 2014.

The Top 50 Problems With Performance Appraisals by Dr. John Sullivan. January 31, 2011

Make Managers Responsible. Michael Tucker. March 1, 2012.

How to Set SMART Goals: Guide for Supervisors and Employee - http://hr.smcgov.org/how-set-smart-goals-guide-supervisors-and-employees

The Manager's New Role in Goal Setting: Coach https://blog.betterworks.com/managers-new-role-goal-setting-coach/

Municipal Evaluation Forms

Brentwood Performance Evaluation/Self Evaluation Form

Concord Performance Evaluations Forms

Pittsburg Performance Evaluation/Self Evaluation Forms

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Orinda Performance Review Appraisal/Self Evaluation Forms

Contra Costa County Fire Protection District Employee Evaluation form

San Pablo Municipal Evaluations Form

Existing Coaching Programs

Marin County Performance Management: Managing for Results 2016-2018

San Mateo Collaborative Performance Management Systems Process Guide. August 11, 2010.

Walnut Creek Performance Evaluation Resource. 2016.

Other

Interview with Municipal Resources Group (MRG Consulting), February 19, 2016.

Stay Interview Questions.

Software Options Evaluated

Google Docs. www.google.com/docs

Smartsheet (Learning & Talent Management Sheets). https://www.smartsheet.com/hr-solutions/learning-talent-development#HeroContent

Share Point Software System for Performance Management Evaluations. https://products.office.com/en-us/sharepoint/collaboration

Talent Quest (Performance & Goals Software). http://www.talentquest.com/software/#slide3

Workday (Human Capital Management/Talent Management). http://www.workday.com/applications/human_capital_management.php#~/tabs-wrapper=rid9105d~/

Cornerstone (Performance Management). https://www.cornerstoneondemand.com/

Potential Consultant for “Call to Action” Training

Municipal Resources Group 675 Hartz Avenue., Ste 300, Danville, CA 94526 (866) 774-3222 http://municipalresourcegroup.com/

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EXISTINGCOACHINGPROGRAMS

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Assumptions

1. This is a new approach to Performance Management, NOT working without any performance management system. Talent management requires gathering information on how well an employee is doing their job, goals, responsibilities, and achievements.

2. Probationary employees have a written evaluation at 3, 6 and 12 months and

have “coaching conversations” as part of normal supervisor communication

3. Problem employees have written performance improvement plans that are linked to written evaluations

4. Supervisors are trained to give and receive feedback and have a “coaching”

approach to leadership

5. Some agencies have negotiated performance evaluation systems – to change them will require meet and confer

6. Public employees have civil service protections. Employees are not at will.

7. Public agencies do not often link financial incentives to performance

management – bonuses, etc.

8. Public employees are doing the people’s work and the employees are highly visible and their work project under scrutiny

9. PERB ruling now on whether employees can have union representation during

performance evaluation annual meeting with Supervisor

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Is the Annual Performance Review Dead? GE is latest company to reject time-consuming paperwork and yearly appraisals By Dana Wilkie 8/19/2015 The announcement that General Electric (GE) has joined a list of high-profile companies that are getting rid of annual performance reviews has sparked a national dialogue among HR professionals about the usefulness of such appraisals—and the alternatives available for deciding who gets pay raises, bonuses and promotions. In the minds of some in the HR profession, “the annual performance review is dead,” said Jim Barnett, CEO and co-founder of Glint, which sells a cloud-based employee engagement tool. “We’re in the early stages of a revolution,” he said. “A lot of companies are doing this … and I think over the next two years we’re going to see a profound shift in this area. Progressive HR leaders are realizing that they need continuous, real-time feedback and solutions.” GE abandoned its forced rankings about a decade ago—a system that required managers to rate each worker’s performance using a number that compared them with peers. Those scoring in the bottom 10 percent were typically fired. But in August 2015, GE also reportedly decided to scrap formal annual reviews for its 300,000 employees entirely, replacing these evaluations with more frequent conversations and introducing an app to help employees' managers and teammates share feedback. In July 2015, Accenture—one of the largest consultancies in the world—announced it was shedding annual performance reviews in favor of a system in which employees receive timely feedback from their managers immediately following assignments. Other prominent corporations have decided to ditch the forced rankings and voluminous paperwork that have come to be associated with performance reviews, and which some studies indicate don’t foster productivity or improvement and actually incite antagonism between managers and employees. Deloitte has announced that it’s experimenting with a new program that eschews rankings, evaluates workers incrementally throughout the year and relies on only four simple questions, two of which require mere yes or no answers. Microsoft chucked its stacked rankings almost two years ago, as have Adobe, Gap and Medtronic. In the 18 months following Adobe’s March 2012 announcement that it would replace stacked rankings, shares in the software company rose 68 percent, according to a Forbes article. In all, 6 percent of Fortune 500 companies have gotten rid of rankings, according to CEB, a management research firm formerly known as the Corporate Executive Board. Cliff Stevenson, a senior research analyst for the Institute for Corporate Productivity—which studies management practices—recently told the Washington Post that the figure is closer to 10 percent.

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Why They’re Not Working CEB research has found that more than 9 in 10 managers are dissatisfied with how their companies conduct annual performance reviews, and almost 9 in 10 HR leaders say the process doesn’t yield accurate information. In addition, “they’re incredibly time-consuming,” said Rose Mueller-Hanson, HR practice leader at the CEB, who noted that in a recent CEB survey, managers said they spend an average of 210 hours a year in performance management activities. Managers said their employees, in turn, each spend 40 hours a year. Seventy-seven percent of HR executives, Mueller-Hanson said, believe performance reviews don’t accurately reflect employee contributions. “It turns out this mistrust is well-founded,” she added. “Our research shows that individual performance ratings have absolutely zero correlation with actual business results. Many of our members and clients have started to really question the return they are getting from all this work.” Furthermore, performance reviews “set up an uncomfortable dynamic between managers and employees in which one person is judge and jury for the other,” she said.“Recent neuroscience research shows that this dynamic can put employees on the defensive and actually result in worse performance—even for high-performers.” The process can also be perceived by employees as unfair. When an organization is foundering financially, managers might be instructed to deflate performance appraisals so the company doesn’t hand out too much in pay raises or bonuses. This makes the performance review process seem “rigged” to employees, leaving them less motivated and harming relationships between them and their managers. “People are realizing that doing anything annually, whether it’s a performance review, engagement survey or goal-setting, makes no sense,” said Barnett. “Society is moving so much faster. People are leaving [jobs] at a much faster rate, and we have to keep up with that pace; that’s impossible with annual reviews.” More Frequent Check-Ins Some companies that have stepped away from annual reviews are, in addition to taking other steps, encouraging more frequent manager-employee check-ins—quarterly, monthly or even weekly. This could be as simple as a short meeting or a coffee break. “Check-ins don't have to be long affairs,” said Stephen Balzac, president of the organizational development firm 7 Steps Ahead. “With practice, they should become fairly smooth and quick.” Said Barnett: “Think of it this way: A conversation is a lot less work than an essay. If you’re no longer providing ratings in, say, 30 areas, with multiple paragraphs explaining

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strengths and weaknesses and summarizing someone’s objectives for an entire year, then it’s about having a meaningful conversation in which you recognize accomplishment and strengths and discuss developmental areas.” Mueller-Hanson said one example of a check-in might be when a manager and employee pause briefly after a meeting to discuss what went well, what could have gone better and what should be done differently for the next meeting. “If an organization removes some of the time-consuming administrative requirements of the performance review approach—setting complex goals, filling out review forms, multi-rater feedback—this will free up time for higher-value activities, like ongoing informal feedback,” she said. Promotions, Pay, Productivity All of these ideas may make one wonder how employers can objectively hand out pay raises, bonuses and promotions if they no longer rely on a rating system that, in essence, puts employees in competition with one another for the highest scores. “Performance reviews are based on several long-held assumptions that don’t hold up to scrutiny,” Mueller-Hanson said. “One is that having a rating is necessary to make decisions about pay and promotions. It’s actually not, and many organizations have started to figure out alternatives. “A second assumption is that getting a rating at the end of the year is a way to motivate people to perform better because they will want to strive for the highest possible rating. Actually, performance ratings are not motivators and can even be de-motivators.” One reason for that, Barnett said, is that promotions and raises have long been decided based on subjective evaluations, even when supposedly “objective” annual reviews are involved. For instance, unconscious bias appears to be a factor when supervisors fill out performance appraisals. Well-respected testing tools show that personal quirks and biases, conscious and not, influence our appraisals of other people. These hidden biases influence how supervisors think about and describe workers. Alternative Ways of Thinking Balzac offered some advice for companies to rethink the way they evaluate their employees: 1. Eliminate all checkboxes and numeric scales. “Performance is more complex than that,” he said. “A good system needs to highlight significant incidents, provide clear examples of positive and negative behaviors, and include specifics.” Is this HR sacrilege? No, said Balzac: “There is an inherent assumption that forced rankings are clinical and objective. Just because we assign something a number doesn't

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make it either clinical or objective. It's just a number, and numbers feel good, logical and scientific. We lose a lot of information when we turn things into numbers. Shades of meaning and nuance are erased, which blinds us to how performance may be occurring and what people are actually doing.” 2. Provide feedback on things the employee can change. Avoid talking about personality traits or characteristics they can't change. 3. When giving negative feedback, focus on specific incidents and examples. Talk about your impressions and feelings, and never make judgments about what's going on in the employee's head, for instance, by saying: “You clearly don't care about this project.” 4. Don’t set up your team members in competition with one another. “As soon as you do that, performance reviews are just an excuse to promote yourself and trash your teammates,” Balzac said. “I hear a lot about how a real professional would never do that. If you believe that, I have a bridge to sell you.” 5. Focus on strengths more than weaknesses. “Focusing on weakness sends the message ‘What’s wrong with you?’ Focusing on strength gets people excited and motivated to grow. A focus on weakness really says that your strengths don't matter. You can praise [Boston Red Sox player] David Ortiz for being a great home run hitter or you can fire him for being a terrible pitcher.” 6. Don’t forget about intangible behaviors. “It's hard to rate behaviors like helping a team member or boosting morale. Reviews need to be more holistic and find ways to take into account nonobvious team-building behaviors. The person who helps keep everyone else's mood up when things are tough is appreciated, but not really noticed—until they’re gone.” See more at: http://www.shrm.org/hrdisciplines/employeerelations/articles/pages/performance-reviews-are-dead.aspx#sthash.YQvZCfrZ.dpuf

Why "Constructive Feedback" Doesn't Improve Performance

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Constructive feedback rarely improves performance. Constructive feedback, which is usually critical, rarely helps anyone, and certainly rarely improves employee performance on the job. In his article in the Harvard Business Review, Tony Schwartz, President and CEO of the Energy Project, and author of Be Excellent At Anything, says that when we hear the phrase from someone, "would you mind if I give you some feedback?" what that actually means to most of us is "would you mind if I gave you some negative feedback," wrapped up in the guise of constructive criticism, whether you want it or not. There are some fundamental problems with negative criticism, regardless of whether we clothe it politely as "constructive." First, Schwartz contends, criticism "challenges our sense of value. Criticism implies judgment and we all recoil from feeling judged." Indeed, psychologists such as Daniel Goleman, contend that threats to our self-esteem and sense of self-worth in the form of criticism can feel like threats to our survival. Schwartz identifies three mistakes that people make when giving critical feedback:

• The person giving the feedback often does so from a position of having their value or self-esteem feeling threatened;

• The more the other person feels threatened, the less open they are to value or consider the constructive feedback;

• It's about "being right," and the other person "being wrong," a case and story is built that makes the perspective of the person giving the feedback "true" and the other person's perspective "faulty."

Part of our resistance to positive reactions to negative feedback is the way our brains work. Neuroscientists have clearly identified that our brains are fundamentally protective, defensive mechanisms. If your ego and sense of self is threatened, your brain unconsciously will act to protect and defend, either actively or passively. John Cacioppo, at the University of Chicago was able to demonstrate in a series of experiments that the brain reacts more strongly to stimuli it deems negative. There is a greater surge in electrical activity. Cacioppo's research was consistent with that of Tiffany Ito and he colleagues at Ohio State University, whose research confirmed the brain's stronger response to negative information. Our capacity to weigh negative input so heavily most likely evolved for a good reason-to keep us out of harm's way. From the dawn of human history, our very survival depended on our skill at dodging danger. The brain developed systems that would make it unavoidable for us not to notice danger and thus, hopefully, respond to it.

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Nowhere does negative or constructive criticism appear more frequently than in performance reviews of employees. The prevailing theory is that criticism, which invariably is part of the performance review, will improve the employee's performance, and in addition the employee will positively welcome it. Nothing can be further from the truth. Second only to firing an employee, managers rate performance appraisals as the task they dislike the most. In fact, neuroscience research has shown that providing negative performance appraisal feedback causes actual physical pain to both the employee and the manager. The reality is that the traditional performance appraisal as practiced in the majority of organizations today is fundamentally flawed, and incongruent with our values-based, vision-driven and collaborative work environments. Robert Sutton, Stanford University professor, says that performance evaluations do more harm than good. A 1998 study by Development Dimensions Incorporated, found that employers themselves expressed overwhelming dissatisfaction with performance reviews. The consulting firm, People IQ, in a 2005 national survey, found that 87% of employees and managers felt performance reviews were neither useful nor effective. In an article published in The Psychological Bulletin, psychologists A. Kluger and A. Denisi report completion of a meta-analysis of 607 studies of performance evaluations and concluded that at least 30% of the performance reviews ended up in decreased employee performance. Tom Coens and Mary Jenkins, in their book, Abolishing Performance Appraisals: Why They Backfire and What To Do Instead, detail studies that clearly show performance appraisals do not work and outline what could replace them. Garold Markle, in his book, Catalytic Coaching: The End of The Performance Review, argues that performance reviews have reached the end of their utility and should be replaced with a manager-employee coaching system. Literature abounds with systems and strategies for giving constructive criticism, and consultants have made lucrative livings implementing such systems in organizations, despite how flawed there are. Perhaps the silliest component of these systems is to suggest to the person giving the constructive feedback to "sandwich it" between positive statements, as if the person receiving the feedback will focus on the positive part of the sandwich, and not the negative. Again, this ignores the brain's programmed preference to respond to negative information. The reality is that constructive criticism is an oxymoron. All criticism is inherently

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destructive and negative, however we may attempt to window dress it, or "sandwich it" between positive statements. Anything constructive is associated with growth, which requires a person to be open, not in a defensive state of mind. When put together, these two ideas constitute an oxymoron. To be in an open, receiving state of mind, the feedback must be positive, or at least guide the recipient to self-awareness and self-discovery. How to Have a Coaching Conversation

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The tenor of a coaching conversation can make all the difference in how employees accept feedback and, as a result, performance management. Terence Traut December 19, 2013 Coaching is the cornerstone of great leadership. Building a pipeline of leaders that can achieve results through people is the key to sustained growth as an organization, and these coaching conversations are the key to that future success.” This sentiment from Sean Dineen, vice president of global learning and quality at customer management organization Convergys, reflects the importance many companies place on coaching as the tool to drive performance and employee engagement. Moving the Performance Needle An effective coaching conversation helps the person being coached, or the coachee, to unleash his or her potential because coaching is a performance management tool, as is feedback, disciplinary discussions, mentoring and training. However, the three are different in many ways. Feedback should be given frequently so employees know if they are on the right track. Constructive feedback helps them get back on course, while positive feedback provides recognition and affirmation that the employee is doing well. Disciplinary discussions are necessary when constructive feedback goes unheeded and performance or behavior remains unacceptable. These conversations are used to turn around unacceptable performance and avoid corrective action. Mentoring is used to develop career-related skills. Mentoring conversations pass wisdom and insight from mentor to mentee. And training provides an employee with the skills and knowledge he or she needs to succeed. However, unlike feedback — which is ubiquitous and serendipitous; it happens whenever the situation calls for it — coaching is planned. Coaching can be done in a scheduled session where the coach and coachee can reflect on the past few weeks, for example, to review progress made on a specific job-related skill. Coaching also can be done in the moment as situations arise. Unlike disciplinary conversations, talent managers can use coaching to turn good performance into great. Much like athletes use coaches to help them fine-tune athletic performance, corporate coaches help employees fine-tune their job performance. Unlike mentoring, which focuses on broader career aspirations, coaching focuses on job-specific skills that will help the employee succeed today. And unlike training, coaching leverages the skills and knowledge an employee already has. Most employees know how to do their work. Coaching helps them focus on those critical skills that will take their performance to another level.

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Coaching is most effective when used on employees who are willing to grow and develop. “Coaching is one of the fundamental skills a manager needs to build a great team and get great results,” said Linda Simon, senior vice president of leadership and organizational development at satellite television provider DirecTV. The Coaching Conversation There are two primary goals in coaching: To improve performance and to help employees gain the ability to self-assess. Joseph Bosch, executive vice president and chief human resources officer at DirecTV, said continuous improvement and self-assessment are key elements of a successful coaching model. Coaching, he said, must “foster a mindset that in this competitive world we must all get better and better every day.” To encourage self-assessment, coaches should be asking questions and listening: How do employees think they’re doing? What do they think they are doing well? How can they improve? These questions form the basis for a coaching conversation. Let’s say a talent manager is coaching John, one of the organization’s best customer service agents, who is looking to reduce his average handle time, or AHT. The two last met two weeks ago. A coaching conversation might go something like this:

Coach: John — thanks for meeting with me. It’s been a couple weeks since we last got together. And last time we discussed how you might be able to reduce your AHT. How has that been going? John: I’m pretty excited. Overall, my times seem to be coming down. In fact, this week my times are 20 percent less than two weeks ago. Coach (went well): That’s great, John. Obviously, you’ve been doing something to make that happen. What have you been doing to get those numbers down? What’s been going well? John: Well, I tried sticking more to the script. I know when I’ve deviated, my AHT soared. Coach (support and build): Great. I know the team put a lot of work into the script to keep conversations focused and allow for time to listen to the customer. I’m glad that it has been working for you. Coach (went well): What else have you been doing to reduce your

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AHT? John: Well, I’ve been paying more attention to the caller’s tone. If they seem in a hurry, I try to mirror their urgency and avoid chit-chat. Coach (explore): Interesting. What clues do you hear? How can you detect the caller’s tone? John: Really it’s a combination of pace and attitude. A lot of callers sound rushed and a bit frustrated. While I stay calm to help them calm down, I also avoid any “noise” like talking about the weather or where they’re calling from since not only does it add to my AHT, but it also annoys those callers. Coach (support and build): Fantastic. It can be a challenge to pick up clues accurately and make those adjustments on the fly. Paying close attention to the caller’s tone helps. Coach (do differently): Is there anything that you’d do differently to reduce AHT even more? John: I need to brush up on using the system. I still fumble around a bit trying to locate the right information. Coach (share insight): The system does require some practice to get to the information needed. I struggled when I was an agent, and found that sitting with someone who knew the system really helped. John: That would be awesome. Coach (do differently): Is there anything else you might have done differently to get your AHT even lower? John: Well, I could use the system macros when entering information in the system. Instead of typing everything, if I used the macros, I could eliminate some typing — and some dead airtime. Coach (support and build): That’s a great idea. Time saved typing will definitely help reduce AHT and will increase the value of your notes. Coach (summarize and support): So, John, it sounds like you’ve made some great progress with AHT. You’ve been following the script more and listening for clues from the caller; keep doing that to reduce AHT. As you said, if you got to know the system better and used macros to enter system notes, you’d be able to reduce AHT even more. Focus on the system and macros over the next two weeks and let’s regroup on the 23rd to see how it’s going.

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John: I will. Thanks.

Throughout the conversation, the coach listens to and analyzes the coachee’s response. The coach is listening for the accuracy of the coachee’s self-assessment. Does the response sound plausible? If the self-assessment is accurate, the coach supports and builds. If the self-assessment sounds inaccurate, the coach can explore, redirect, share insight, provide feedback or defer to later. Why the Coaching Conversation Works This coaching conversation model works for a variety of reasons: It’s a simple conversation and the structure is simple. The model essentially consists of three questions: I know you’ve been working on X; how has it been going? What have you done that has gone well? What might you have done differently that might have made your results even better? Questions encourage self-assessment. Talent leaders want employees to continuously evaluate their performance and identify what’s working and what isn’t. Questions also allow the coach to determine if the employee knows what he or she should know. They also put the primary responsibility on the coachee. Coaches do not need to spend tons of time observing and preparing. Coaching can be simple, but doing it effectively requires a leader who has created a trusting environment, who has the ability to analyze employee performance and who can use appropriate tools to improve performance. Further, when done correctly coaching is more than performance improvement; it’s employee engagement. “As the economy improves but profitability constraints remain rigid, it’s a very challenging marketplace within which to attract and retain talented employees,” said Jeff Muoio, vice president and general manager of field operations at MasTec Advanced Technologies. “Establishing a common language and procedures for coaching and continuous improvement creates an open, transparent culture that gives employees self-confidence and valuable reasons to stay and grow with our company.” Coaching Skills for People Managers by Kasia Gurgul

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The ability to coach is fast becoming an essential management skill. Coaching empowers staff to take accountability in making their own decisions and gives them ownership of their role. It develops their self-awareness and capabilities. It creates higher levels of engagement and therefore retention. Most importantly coaching develops leaders and future leaders. A study published in 2011 by Bersin & Associates (Deloitte) showed that managers’ inability to coach is the #1 most severe performance challenge that organizations face. Companies like Microsoft are now changing their entire performance management system from what Deloitte recently referred to as a 'rank and yank' approach to a coaching and development approach. In August this year I was lucky to be a part of this change at Microsoft in China helping managers have higher quality performance management conversations using a coaching approach. The investment in people development through coaching has a huge impact on bottom line results and a positive investment for all stakeholders. Deloitte's 2011 report demonstrated that organizations with senior leaders who coach effectively and frequently improve their business results by 21% as compared to those who never coach. Research published jointly this year by the International Coaching Federation (ICF) and the Human Capital Institute (HCI) also found that coaching has a positive impact on financial performance. Sixty percent of those surveyed from organisations with strong coaching cultures reported their 2013 revenue was above average compared to their peer group. Yet although more companies are recognizing the true value of a coaching culture in terms of capability development, employee engagement and financial results, only 13% of organisations which participated in the research could be classified as having a strong coaching culture. So why are not more companies making the most of internal coaching despite its clear long term benefits and return on investment? The surface answer is time and money. The bottom line answer is leadership. Stronger leadership is needed to create a coaching company culture. Issue #1 Time: Short Term vs Long Term Thinking

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In October I ran a workshop at a global logistics company aimed at helping managers further develop their coaching skills. One of the managers said she was “too busy” to spend time coaching, not thinking about how coaching would develop and empower her direct reports to think for themselves in the long run, freeing her from being weighed down from constant questioning. Frequently managers are required to continue a technical role while at the same time being a people manager. This can cause overwhelm, especially when coaching is a new skill, leading to the "I'm too busy" response, especially in outsourcing organisations where there is more pressure to be 'billable'. If managers 1) don't know how to coach, 2) don't know when to use a coaching approach, or 3) don't want to invest the time, it is usually about adequate coach training and mindset. Usually the "I'm too busy" mindset can be shifted by training and creation of a coaching culture driven from the top by a savvy leadership team who place a high value on the power of coaching. An effective coaching dialogue can take place in as little as 1-2 minutes. Having frequent short coaching conversations is the key. Often the experience of getting coached by their managers turns managers into better coaches as does seeing their direct reports get better results. Issue #2 Money: Lack of Investment in Coach Training for Managers A lack of investment in coach training means that many managers don’t know how to have quality performance management conversations which result in an engaged and empowered employee. Providing adequate coach training helps managers to see the value in coaching and to get comfortable with adopting it. Budgets for 2015 showed that 81% of organisations surveyed plan to expand the scope of leaders and managers using coaching skills. They also indicated that their budgets for coaching will stay the same. So how will the training be funded? Only good leadership can ensure that the organisations’ coaching strategy is supported by an adequate budget. The 2014 ICF/HCI research showed that organisations with a strong coaching culture were dedicated to providing managers & leaders with coaching skills training. In any change management initiative there needs to be a change sponsor and if leadership truly values the initiative then resources will be adequately allocated. Conclusion

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In order to truly embed coaching in organisations, adequate training for managers and follow up coaching support needs to be provided. The 2014 Building a Coaching Culture report by the ICF and HCI has great suggestions for designing, executing, and evaluating a coaching culture. Ultimately it will come down to how much coaching is valued within the organisation. The quality of the coaching culture will determine if the organisation benefits from coaching in terms of long term employee engagement, stronger leadership capability and financial results. The support of of a program sponsor and leadership is key. Great case studies (http://coachfederation.org/prism) include 2014 ICF Prism Award winner for 1st place, J.K. Organisation, and 2nd place CareSource. The Prism Award honors organisations that have achieved the highest standard of excellence in coaching programs that yield discernible and measurable positive impacts, fulfill rigorous professional standards, address key strategic goals, and shape organisational culture. References: Barry, L. et al. (2014). Global Human Capital Trends. Performance Management is Broken. [online] Bersin and Associates (Deloitte). Available at: https://documents.dupress.deloitte.com/HCTrends2014 [Accessed 15 Dec. 2014]. High-Impact Performance Management: Maximizing Performance Coaching. [online] Bersin & Associates (Deloitte). Available at: http://www.bersin.com/Practice/Detail.aspx?docid=15021&mode=search&p=Talent-Management [Accessed 15 Dec. 2014]. International Coaching Federation and Human Capital Institute, (2014). Building a Coaching Culture. [online] Human Capital Institute. Available at: http://coachfederation.org/about/landing.cfm?ItemNumber=3674&_ga=1.5132282.852644544.1401925106&RDtoken=20906&userID= [Accessed 15 Dec. 2014]. Reinventing Performance Management

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Harvard Business Review At Deloitte we’re redesigning our performance management system. This may not surprise you. Like many other companies, we realize that our current process for evaluating the work of our people—and then training them, promoting them, and paying them accordingly—is increasingly out of step with our objectives. In a public survey Deloitte conducted recently, more than half the executives questioned (58%) believe that their current performance management approach drives neither employee engagement nor high performance. They, and we, are in need of something nimbler, real-time, and more individualized—something squarely focused on fueling performance in the future rather than assessing it in the past. What might surprise you, however, is what we’ll include in Deloitte’s new system and what we won’t. It will have no cascading objectives, no once-a-year reviews, and no 360-degree-feedback tools. We’ve arrived at a very different and much simpler design for managing people’s performance. Its hallmarks are speed, agility, one-size-fits-one, and constant learning, and it’s underpinned by a new way of collecting reliable performance data. This system will make much more sense for our talent-dependent business. But we might never have arrived at its design without drawing on three pieces of evidence: a simple counting of hours, a review of research in the science of ratings, and a carefully controlled study of our own organization. Counting and the Case for Change More than likely, the performance management system Deloitte has been using has some characteristics in common with yours. Objectives are set for each of our 65,000-plus people at the beginning of the year; after a project is finished, each person’s manager rates him or her on how well those objectives were met. The manager also comments on where the person did or didn’t excel. These evaluations are factored into a single year-end rating, arrived at in lengthy “consensus meetings” at which groups of “counselors” discuss hundreds of people in light of their peers. Internal feedback demonstrates that our people like the predictability of this process and the fact that because each person is assigned a counselor, he or she has a representative at the consensus meetings. The vast majority of our people believe the process is fair. We realize, however, that it’s no longer the best design for Deloitte’s emerging needs: Once-a-year goals are too “batched” for a real-time world, and conversations about year-end ratings are generally less valuable than conversations conducted in the moment about actual performance. But the need for change didn’t crystallize until we decided to count things. Specifically, we tallied the number of hours the organization was spending on performance management—and found that completing the forms, holding the meetings, and creating the ratings consumed close to 2 million hours a year. As we studied how those hours were spent, we realized that many of them were eaten up by leaders’ discussions behind closed doors about the outcomes of the process. We wondered if we could somehow shift our investment of time from talking to ourselves about ratings to talking to our people

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about their performance and careers—from a focus on the past to a focus on the future. We found that creating the ratings consumed close to 2 million hours a year. The Science of Ratings Our next discovery was that assessing someone’s skills produces inconsistent data. Objective as I may try to be in evaluating you on, say, strategic thinking, it turns out that how much strategic thinking I do, or how valuable I think strategic thinking is, or how tough a rater I am significantly affects my assessment of your strategic thinking. How significantly? The most comprehensive research on what ratings actually measure was conducted by Michael Mount, Steven Scullen, and Maynard Goff and published in the Journal of Applied Psychology in 2000. Their study—in which 4,492 managers were rated on certain performance dimensions by two bosses, two peers, and two subordinates—revealed that 62% of the variance in the ratings could be accounted for by individual raters’ peculiarities of perception. Actual performance accounted for only 21% of the variance. This led the researchers to conclude (in How People Evaluate Others in Organizations, edited by Manuel London): “Although it is implicitly assumed that the ratings measure the performance of the ratee, most of what is being measured by the ratings is the unique rating tendencies of the rater. Thus ratings reveal more about the rater than they do about the ratee.” This gave us pause. We wanted to understand performance at the individual level, and we knew that the person in the best position to judge it was the immediate team leader. But how could we capture a team leader’s view of performance without running afoul of what the researchers termed “idiosyncratic rater effects”? Putting Ourselves Under the Microscope We also learned that the defining characteristic of the very best teams at Deloitte is that they are strengths oriented. Their members feel that they are called upon to do their best work every day. This discovery was not based on intuitive judgment or gleaned from anecdotes and hearsay; rather, it was derived from an empirical study of our own high-performing teams. Our study built on previous research. Starting in the late 1990s, Gallup conducted a multiyear examination of high-performing teams that eventually involved more than 1.4 million employees, 50,000 teams, and 192 organizations. Gallup asked both high- and lower-performing teams questions on numerous subjects, from mission and purpose to pay and career opportunities, and isolated the questions on which the high-performing teams strongly agreed and the rest did not. It found at the beginning of the study that almost all the variation between high- and lower-performing teams was explained by a very small group of items. The most powerful one proved to be “At work, I have the opportunity to do what I do best every day.” Business units whose employees chose “strongly agree” for this item were 44% more likely to earn high customer satisfaction scores, 50% more likely to have low employee turnover, and 38% more likely to be productive.

We set out to see whether those results held at Deloitte. First we identified 60 high-

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performing teams, which involved 1,287 employees and represented all parts of the organization. For the control group, we chose a representative sample of 1,954 employees. To measure the conditions within a team, we employed a six-item survey. When the results were in and tallied, three items correlated best with high performance for a team: “My oworkers are committed to doing quality work,” “The mission of our company inspires me,” and “I have the chance to use my strengths every day.” Of these, the third was the most powerful across the organization. All this evidence helped bring into focus the problem we were trying to solve with our new design. We wanted to spend more time helping our people use their strengths—in teams characterized by great clarity of purpose and expectations—and we wanted a quick way to collect reliable and differentiated performance data. With this in mind, we set to work. Radical Redesign We began by stating as clearly as we could what performance management is actually for, at least as far as Deloitte is concerned. We articulated three objectives for our new system. The first was clear: It would allow us to recognize performance, particularly through variable compensation. Most current systems do this. But to recognize each person’s performance, we had to be able to see it clearly. That became our second objective. Here we faced two issues—the idiosyncratic rater effect and the need to streamline our traditional process of evaluation, project rating, consensus meeting, and final rating. The solution to the former requires a subtle shift in our approach. Rather than asking more people for their opinion of a team member (in a 360-degree or an upward-feedback survey, for example), we found that we will need to ask only the immediate team leader—but, critically, to ask a different kind of question. People may rate other people’s skills inconsistently, but they are highly consistent when rating their own feelings and intentions. To see performance at the individual level, then, we will ask team leaders not about the skills of each team member but about their own future actions with respect to that person. At the end of every project (or once every quarter for long-term projects) we will ask team leaders to respond to four future-focused statements about each team member. We’ve refined the wording of these statements through successive tests, and we know that at Deloitte they clearly highlight differences among individuals and reliably measure performance. Here are the four:

1. Given what I know of this person’s performance, and if it were my money, I

would award this person the highest possible compensation increase and bonus [measures overall performance and unique value to the organization on a five-point scale from “strongly agree” to “strongly disagree”].

2. Given what I know of this person’s performance, I would always want him or her

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on my team [measures ability to work well with others on the same five-point scale].

3. This person is at risk for low performance [identifies problems that might harm

the customer or the team o a yes-or-no basis].

4. This person is ready for promotion today [measures potential on a yes-or-no basis].

In effect, we are asking our team leaders what they would do with each team member rather than what they think of that individual. When we aggregate these data points over a year, weighting each according to the duration of a given project, we produce a rich stream of information for leaders’ discussions of what they, in turn, will do—whether it’s a question of succession planning, development paths, or performance-pattern analysis. Once a quarter the organization’s leaders can use the new data to review a targeted subset of employees (those eligible for promotion, for example, or those with critical skills) and can debate what actions Deloitte might take to better develop that particular group. In this aggregation of simple but powerful data points, we see the possibility of shifting our 2-million-hour annual investment from talking about the ratings to talking about our people—from ascertaining the facts of performance to considering what we should do in response to those facts. We ask leaders what they’d do with their team members, not what they think of them. to compensation, we want to factor in some uncountable things, such as the difficulty of project assignments in a given year and contributions to the organization other than formal projects. So the data will serve as the starting point for compensation, not the ending point. The final determination will be reached either by a leader who knows each individual personally or by a group of leaders looking at an entire segment of our practice and at many data points in parallel. We could call this new evaluation a rating, but it bears no resemblance, in generation or in use, to the ratings of the past. Because it allows us to quickly capture performance at a single moment in time, we call it a performance snapshot. The Third Objective Two objectives for our new system, then, were clear: We wanted to recognize performance, and we had to be able to see it clearly. But all our research, all our conversations with leaders on the topic of performance management, and all the feedback from our people left us convinced that something was missing. Is performance management at root more about “management” or about “performance”? Put differently, although it may be great to be able to measure and reward the performance you have, wouldn’t it be better still to be able to improve it? Our third objective therefore became to fuel performance. And if the performance snapshot was an organizational tool for measuring it, we needed a tool that team leaders could use to strengthen it. How Deloitte Built a Radically Simple Performance Measure One of the most important tools in our redesigned performance management system is

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the “performance snapshot.” It lets us see performance quickly and reliably across the organization, freeing us to spend more time engaging with our people. Here’s how we created it. 1. The Criteria We looked for measures that met three criteria. To neutralize the idiosyncratic rater effect, we wanted raters to rate their own actions, rather than the qualities or behaviors of the ratee. To generate the necessary range, the questions had to be phrased in the extreme. And to avoid confusion, each one had to contain a single, easily understood concept. We chose one about pay, one about teamwork, one about poor performance, and one about promotion. Those categories may or may not be right for other organizations, but they work for us. 2. The Rater We were looking for someone with vivid experience of the individual’s performance and whose subjective judgment we felt was important. We agreed that team leaders are closest to the performance of ratees and, by virtue of their roles, must exercise subjective judgment. We could have included functional managers, or even ratees’ peers, but we wanted to start with clarity and simplicity. 3. Testing We then tested that our questions would produce useful data. Validity testing focuses on their difficulty (as revealed by mean responses) and the range of responses (as revealed by standard deviations). We knew that if they consistently yielded a tight cluster of “strongly agree” responses, we wouldn’t get the differentiation we were looking for. Construct validity and criterion-related validity are also important. (That is, the questions should collectively test an underlying theory and make it possible to find correlations with outcomes measured in other ways, such as engagement surveys.) 4. Frequency At Deloitte we live and work in a project structure, so it makes sense for us to produce a performance snapshot at the end of each project. For longer-term projects we’ve decided that quarterly is the best frequency. Our goal is to strike the right balance between tying the evaluation as tightly as possible to the experience of the performance and not overburdening our team leaders, lest survey fatigue yield poor data. 5. Transparency We’re experimenting with this now. We want our snapshots to reveal the real-time “truth” of what our team leaders think, yet our experience tells us that if they know that team members will see every data point, they may be tempted to sugarcoat the results to avoid difficult conversations. We know that we’ll aggregate an individual’s snapshot scores into an annual composite. But what, exactly, should we share at year’s end? We want to err on the side of sharing more, not less—to aggregate snapshot scores not only for client work but also for internal projects, along with performance metrics such as hours and sales, in the context of a group of peers—so that we can give our people the richest possible view of where they stand. Time will tell how close to that ideal we can get. Research into the practices of the best team leaders reveals that they conduct regular

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check-ins with each team member about near-term work. These brief conversations allow leaders to set expectations for the upcoming week, review priorities, comment on recent work, and provide course correction, coaching, or important new information. The conversations provide clarity regarding what is expected of each team member and why, what great work looks like, and how each can do his or her best work in the upcoming days—in other words, exactly the trinity of purpose, expectations, and strengths that characterizes our best teams. Our design calls for every team leader to check in with each team member once a week. For us, these check-ins are not in addition to the work of a team leader; they are the work of a team leader. If a leader checks in less often than once a week, the team member’s priorities may become vague and aspirational, and the leader can’t be as helpful—and the conversation will shift from coaching for near-term work to giving feedback about past performance. In other words, the content of these conversations will be a direct outcome of their frequency: If you want people to talk about how to do their best work in the near future, they need to talk often. And so far we have found in our testing a direct and measurable correlation between the frequency of these conversations and the engagement of team members. Very frequent check-ins (we might say radically frequent check-ins) are a team leader’s killer app. That said, team leaders have many demands on their time. We’ve learned that the best way to ensure frequency is to have check-ins be initiated by the team member—who more often than not is eager for the guidance and attention they provide—rather than by the team leader. To support both people in these conversations, our system will allow individual members to understand and explore their strengths using a self-assessment tool and then to present those strengths to their teammates, their team leader, and the rest of the organization. Our reasoning is twofold. First, as we’ve seen, people’s strengths generate their highest performance today and the greatest improvement in their performance tomorrow, and so deserve to be a central focus. Second, if we want to see frequent (weekly!) use of our system, we have to think of it as a consumer technology—that is, designed to be simple, quick, and above all engaging to use. Many of the successful consumer technologies of the past several years (particularly social media) are sharing technologies, which suggests that most of us are consistently interested in ourselves—our own insights, achievements, and impact. So we want this new system to provide a place for people to explore and share what is best about themselves. Transparency This is where we are today: We’ve defined three objectives at the root of performance management—to recognize, see, and fuel performance. We have three interlocking rituals to support them—the annual compensation decision, the quarterly or per-project performance snapshot, and the weekly check-in. And we’ve shifted from a batched focus on the past to a continual focus on the future, through regular evaluations and frequent check-ins. As we’ve tested each element of this design with ever-larger groups across Deloitte, we’ve seen that the change can be an evolution over time: Different business

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units can introduce a strengths orientation first, then more-frequent conversations, then new ways of measuring, and finally new software for monitoring performance. (See the exhibit “Performance Intelligence.”) But one issue has surfaced again and again during this work, and that’s the issue of transparency. When an organization knows something about us, and that knowledge is captured in a number, we often feel entitled to know it—to know where we stand. We suspect that this issue will need its own radical answer. It’s not the number we assign to a person; it’s the fact that there’s a single number. team member. We did this because we knew from the past that when an evaluation is to be shared, the responses skew high—that is, they are sugarcoated. Because we wanted to capture unfiltered assessments, we made the responses private. We worried that otherwise we might end up destroying the very truth we sought to reveal. But what, in fact, is that truth? What do we see when we try to quantify a person? In the world of sports, we have pages of statistics for each player; in medicine, a three-page report each time we get blood work done; in psychometric evaluations, a battery of tests and percentiles. At work, however, at least when it comes to quantifying performance, we try to express the infinite variety and nuance of a human being in a single number. Surely, however, a better understanding comes from conversations—with your team leader about how you’re doing, or between leaders as they consider your compensation or your career. And these conversations are best served not by a single data point but by many. If we want to do our best to tell you where you stand, we must capture as much of your diversity as we can and then talk about it. We haven’t resolved this issue yet, but here’s what we’re asking ourselves and testing: What’s the most detailed view of you that we can gather and share? How does that data support a conversation about your performance? How can we equip our leaders to have insightful conversations? Our question now is not What is the simplest view of you? but What is the richest? Our question now is not What is the simplest view of you? but What is the richest? Over the past few years the debate about performance management has been characterized as a debate about ratings—whether or not they are fair, and whether or not they achieve their stated objectives. But perhaps the issue is different: not so much that ratings fail to convey what the organization knows about each person but that as presented, that knowledge is sadly one-dimensional. In the end, it’s not the particular number we assign to a person that’s the problem; rather, it’s the fact that there is a single number. Ratings are a distillation of the truth—and up until now, one might argue, a necessary one. Yet we want our organizations to know us, and we want to know ourselves at work, and that can’t be compressed into a single number. We now have the technology to go from a small data version of our people to a big data version of them. As we scale up our new approach across Deloitte, that’s the problem we want to solve next.

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Performance Plans2016 - 2018

MANAGINGFOR

RESULTS

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PERFORMANCE PLANS

2016-2018

MANAGING FOR RESULTS

Presented to the Board of Supervisors

Damon ConnollySUPERVISOR, DISTR ICT 1

By Matthew HymelCounty Administrator

Katie RiceSUPERVISOR, DISTR ICT 2

Kathrin SearsSUPERVISOR, DISTR ICT 3

Judy ArnoldSUPERVISOR, DISTR ICT 5

Steve KinseyPRESIDENT

SUPERVISOR, DISTR ICT 4

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Acknowledgments

The following individuals are gratefully acknowledged for their contributions to the production of this book:

COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR’S OFFICE:Matthew Hymel, County Administrator

Dan Eilerman, Assistant County AdministratorAngela Nicholson, Assistant County Administrator

Bret Uppendahl, Budget Manager

Heather Burton, ERP Senior System Analyst Janell Hampton, Management and Budget Analyst

Ralph Hernandez, Management and Budget Analyst Jacalyn Mah, Management and Budget Analyst Talia Smith, Management and Budget Analyst

Kristi Villareal, Management and Budget Analyst

Sandy Laird, Executive Assistant to the County AdministratorSue Mittiga, Administrative Assistant (Retired)

Janis West, Administrative Assistant

MANAGING FOR RESULTS WORKING GROUP:Michael Daly, Chief Probation Officer

Lauren Houde, Assistant Assessor - Recorder - County ClerkSara Jones, Director, Marin County Free Library

Tom Lai, Assistant Director, Community Development AgencyMaureen Lewis, Chief Assistant Director, Health and Human Services

Michael Ridgway, UndersheriffCraig Tackabery, Chief Assistant Director, Public Works

Jason Weber, Fire ChiefKevin Yeager, Deputy Director, Information Services Technology

OTHER CONTRIBUTORS:Book layout and design by Talia Smith

Photos by Craig Solin and Brent AinsworthCover design by Toby Silverman

County Administrator3501 Civic Center Drive, Suite #325

San Rafael, CA 94903Phone: (415) 473-6358 Fax: (415) 473-4104

Email: [emailprotected]

All County publications are available in alternative formats (Braille, Large Print, or CD), upon request. Requests for accommodations may be made by calling (415) 473-6358 (Voice), (415) 473-3232 (TDD/TTY) or by e-mail at caobudget@marincounty.

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C O U N T Y A D M I N I S T R A T O R ’ S M E S S A G E

I am pleased to present to your Board the FY 2016-18 draft performance plans for County departments. The plans include a summary of recent accomplishments for each department as well as a listing of key initiatives and performance measures that will guide department priorities and focus areas over the upcoming two year planning period. For context, we have included current year budget figures. After our March budget workshops, we will work with departments to finalize their budget for next year and we will submit the FY 2016-18 Proposed Budget for your review and consideration on June 7th.

This year’s format represents a change in the content and presentation of department performance plans and is the result of our efforts to ‘reboot’ our Managing for Results (MFR) program to be more meaningful to the public and to our employees. I would like to thank the department heads and their staff for their commitment to improving the content and clarity of their respective performance plans. I would also like to specifically thank the Managing for Results Working Group for their collaborative effort in guiding the changes to our MFR Program.

Sincerely,

Matthew HymelCounty Administrator

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Table of Contents

T A B L E O F C O N T E N T SMANAGING FOR RESULTS OVERVIEW 1

Countywide Goals 2

Program Overview 3

MARIN COUNTY PROFILE 5

Demographics 6

Economic Trends 7

Comparison Counties 9

BUDGET SUMMARY 13

County Government 14

Budget Overview 16

Budget Charts - FY 2015-16 Approved Budget 18

DEPARTMENT PERFORMANCE PLANS 21

Agriculture, Weights and Measures 23

Assessor – Recorder – County Clerk 27

Board of Supervisors 31

County Administrator’s Office 35

Child Support Services 41

Community Development Agency 43

County Counsel 49

Cultural Services 53

District Attorney 57

Elections 61

UC Cooperative Extension Farm Advisor 65

Department of Finance 71

Marin County Fire 77

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Table of Contents

Health and Human Services 81

Human Resources 89

Information Services and Technology 93

Marin County Free Library 97

Marin County Parks 101

Probation 105

Public Defender 111

Department of Public Works 115

Sheriff – Coroner 121

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COUNTYWIDE GOALS | PROGRAM OVERVIEW

MANAGING FOR RESULTSOVERVIEW

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2

Managing for Results Overview

The mission of the County of Marin is to provide excellent services that support healthy, safe and

sustainable communities; preserve Marin’s unique environmental heritage; and encourage meaningful participation in the governance of the County by all.

Healthy Communities

• Improve community access to health services• Provide community enrichment through cultural,

recreational, and learning opportunities• Promote healthy lifestyles for county residents

Safe Communities

• Ensure community safety through effective law enforcement and prevention

• Promote a fair justice system through restorative and therapeutic programs

• Reduce the risk of wildfires in partnership with our community

• Provide effective emergency preparedness and response

Sustainable Communities

• Reduce traffic congestion by providing transporta-tion choices

• Support affordable housing opportunities• Promote efficient resource and energy use• Encourage collaboration with public/private orga-

nizationsEnvironmental Preservation

• Maintain and enhance open space• Support and promote the county’s agriculture

heritage• Protect the natural environment

Community Participation

• Encourage an informed and engaged community• Improve access to county facilities and services• Promote and support diversity

C O U N T Y W I D E G O A L S

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Managing for Results Overview

3

W H A T I S M F RPerformance management involves measuring the effectiveness of County programs in achieving community outcomes. To further define this strategy, the Board of Supervisors expressed its vision in becoming a well-managed county with the following elements:

• Results-oriented• Customer and community focused• Mission and values-driven• Collaboration and participation among all levels of the

organization• Cycle and culture of continuous improvement• Budgets and business systems aligned with overall

mission, values and goals The County developed and implemented Managing For Results (MFR) to achieve this vision of a well-managed county. MFR is a tool that helps the County do the most important things well by identifying the County’s most important priorities, aligning department and program activities to reflect those priorities, and using measures to track progress in accomplishing them. Departments develop biennial performance plans, which include their goals, initiatives, and measures to help inform service level allocations.

2 0 1 6 R E B O O TTo effectively adapt and respond to the complex issues facing our community, we developed a countywide strategic vision that focuses our resources towards the highest priorities. The County’s 5 Year Business Plan is the culmination of a concerted effort to engage employees and collaborate with community leaders to identify how we can be a more responsive government for the benefit of our community.

One of the focus areas of the 5 Year Business Plan is to strengthen communication and increase employee engagement to create a stronger county and provide better services to our community. A key strategy of this focus is to ‘reboot’ the Managing for Results (MFR) program to focus on high level, more meaningful indicators and ensure that departments engage their employees in the development of their performance plans and metrics.

P R O G R A M O V E R V I E W

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Managing for Results Overview

RESULTS ORIENTED

CUSTOMER & COMMUNITY FOCUSED

Set goals and objectives based

on mission, values and vision for the

community

Measure results to gauge progress on accomplishing

goals and objectives

Develop key initiatives

and measures to support goals and

objectives and track results

Obtain public

feedback and learn from results to make improvements if

needed

Evaluate results and

communicate to the organization,

public, and stakeholders

Allocate budget and staffing resources to

implement key initiatives

ANALYZE RESULTS

DELIVER

SERVICES

LEARN

AND

IMPROVE

ALIGN PROGRAMS

P E R F O R M A N C E M A N A G E M E N T F R A M E W O R K

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DEMOGRAPHICS | ECONOMIC TRENDSCOMPARISON COUNTIES

MARIN COUNTYPROFILE

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Marin County Profile

Population by Ethnicity

72% WHITE16% HISPANIC6% ASIAN

4% OTHER, TWO OR MORE RACES2% AFRICAN AMERICAN

Population by Jurisdiction

6% MILL VALLEY5% SAN ANSELMO5% LARKSPUR4% CORTE MADERA4% TIBURON3% FAIRFAX3% SAUSALITO1% ROSS1% BELVEDERE

27% UNINCORPORATED

23%SAN RAFAEL

21%NOVATO

258,9722015

252,4092010

247,2892005

Total Population

D E M O G R A P H I C S

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Marin County Profile

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Median Home Sale Prices

Annual Unemployment Rate

E C O N O M I C T R E N D S

1995 2000 2005 2010 2015

$100K

$300K

$1.0M

$500K

$700K

$900K

$0

$935,000

$676,500

$819,000

$523,000

$334,000

1990 2000 2005 2010 201419950%

4%

6%

8%

12.4%

10.3%

8.0%7.5%

5.2%

4.3%

Median Home Sale Price: Marin County Assessor - all single family homes (attached and detached), 2016Unemployment Rate: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2015

Total Population: California Department of Finance, April 2015Pop. by Ethnicity: U.S. Census Bureau, 2014 American Community SurveyPop. by Jurisdiction: California Department of Finance, April 2015

California Bay Area Marin

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Marin County Profile

Napapop. 140,362

Sonomapop. 496,253

San Mateopop. 753,123

Santa Cruzpop. 271,646

Montereypop. 425,413

San Luis Obispopop. 274,293

Santa Barbarapop. 437,643

Marinpop. 258,972

C O M P A R I S O N C O U N T I E S

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Marin County ProfileC O M P A R I S O N C O U N T I E S • FY 2016 - 18

San Luis Obispo

Monterey

Santa Barbara

Napa

Sonoma

Marin

Santa Cruz

San Mateo

83

129

159

186

312

495

605

1,664

49.3%

43.8%

31.8%

30.0%

26.4%

24.4%

19.2%

8.6%

Population Density per Square Mile | Percent of Population in Unincorporated Areas

Average Travel Time to Work(Minutes)

SantaBarbara

Monterey San LuisObispo

Napa Sonoma SantaCruz

San Mateo Marin

19232221

25 26 2833

Monterey Santa Barbara

SantaCruz

SanMateo

San Luis Obispo

Napa Sonoma Marin

51%45%44%44%42%41%

37%35%

Percent of Population 45 Years and Over

30%

40%

50%

Pop. Density and % of Population Residing in Unincorporated Areas: California Department of Finance, April 2015Percent of Population 45 Years and Over: U.S. Census Bureau, 2014 American Community SurveyAverage Travel Time to Work: U.S. Census Bureau, 2014 American Community Survey

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Marin County ProfileC O M P A R I S O N C O U N T I E S • FY 2016 - 18

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Unemployment Rate(December 2015)

San Mateo Marin

Napa

Sonoma San Luis Obispo

Santa Cruz

Santa Barbara

Monterey

$2,247 Sonoma

$2,252 Monterey

$2,287 San Luis Obispo

$2,362 Santa Cruz

$2,375 Marin$2,613 Santa Barbara

$2,791 San Mateo

$4,079 Napa

8.312.09.69.0

8.59.97.4

10.2

Budgeted County Expenditure(per resident)

County Employees(per 1,000 residents)

$98,626 Marin

Per Capita Income

$89,659 San Mateo

$54,596 Napa

$52,280 Santa Cruz

$50,523 Santa Barbara

$49,185 Sonoma

$46,109 Monterey

$45,947 San Luis Obispo

3.1% 3.2%

4.2% 4.5%

5.1% 5.5%

8.5% 10.4%

County Employees and Expenditures: Adopted FY 2014-15 Final Budgets: Schedule 1 (excluding Special Districts & Other Agencies and Enterprise Funds)Unemployment Rate: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2015Per Capita Income: U.S. Department of Commerce Bureau of Economic Analysis, 2014

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BUDGET SUMMARY

COUNTY GOVERNMENT | BUDGET OVERVIEW

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Budget Summary

T H E B O A R D O F S U P E R V I S O R SThe Board of Supervisors is both the legislative and executive body of Marin County government. The Board adopts policies, establishes programs, appoints non-elected department heads, and adopts annual budgets for all County departments. The Board of Supervisors also serves as the governing board for several special districts including the Open Space District, Flood Control District, Housing Authority, Transit District and Redevelopment Agency. Each special district is distinct from the County and has separate roles, budgets and staff. Supervisors also serve on regional agencies and as ex-officio members on the boards of county service districts. The Board of Supervisors is a five-member board elected by district on the basis of population, as required by state law. Supervisors are elected on a non-partisan basis and serve for a term of four years. Supervisors also elect a President, Vice President, and Second Vice President annually among themselves.

The current Marin County Board of Supervisors includes:

• District 1: Damon Connolly (2nd Vice President)• District 2: Katie Rice• District 3: Kathrin Sears• District 4: Steve Kinsey (President)• District 5: Judy Arnold (Vice President)

The Board generally meets every Tuesday in the BoardChambers of the Civic Center to discuss and vote on all County policy items. The Board’s meeting schedule and agenda are posted weekly on the Board of Supervisors website, located at www.marincounty.org. Audio and video broadcasts of Board meetings (both live and archival) are also available on the Board of Supervisors’ website.

C O U N T Y A D M I N I S T R A T O RThe County Administrator is appointed by and operates directly under the Board of Supervisors, providing research, information, recommendations, and management guidance and assistance.

The County Administrator’s Office (CAO) provides overall countywide coordination of programs and services. The CAO annually prepares and monitors implementation of the budget adopted by the Board of Supervisors, prepares the County of Marin State and Federal Legislative Plan for the Board of Supervisors, and oversees implementation of the County’s Strategic Plan.

B O A R D S A N D C O M M I S S I O N SThe Board of Supervisors has established advisory boards, committees and commissions to which it appoints residents to serve. The purpose of these appointive boards, committees and commissions is to provide opportunities for members of the community to participate in and act on matters of public concern. Some commissions are discretionary while others are mandated by state statute. Each commission represents the constituents of a specific issue, policy or program focus.

C O U N T Y O R G A N I Z A T I O N A L S T R U C T U R EThe Marin County Proposed Budget is divided into six functional service areas that represent general categories of service to county residents:

• Health and Human Services• Public Safety• Administration and Finance• Community Development and Public Works• Community Services

These service areas are composed of 22 separate departments. A majority of the departments are directed by officials appointed by the Board of Supervisors, while some - including the Assessor-Recorder-County Clerk, Sheriff-Coroner, and District Attorney - are elected by residents to serve a four-year term. As a result of the passage of Measure B in November 2008, the offices of Auditor-Controller and Treasurer-Tax Collector were consolidated into an appointed Director of Finance position. The chart on the following page illustrates the County organizational structure by functional service area.

C O U N T Y G O V E R N M E N T

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Budget Summary

15

M A R I N C O U N T Y O R G A N I Z A T I O N C H A R T

B O A R D O F S U P E R V I S O R S

COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

AGENCY

AGRICULTURE, WEIGHTS AND

MEASURES

CHILD SUPPORT SERVICES

HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND PUBLIC

WORKS

COMMUNITY SERVICESPUBLIC SAFETYHEALTH AND

HUMAN SERVICES

ASSESSOR - RECORDER -

COUNTY CLERKPUBLIC WORKS CULTURAL SERVICESDISTRICT ATTORNEY

COUNTY COUNSEL UCCE FARM ADVISOR

MARIN COUNTY FIRE

DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE

MARIN COUNTY FREE LIBRARYPROBATION

ELECTIONS MARIN COUNTY PARKSPUBLIC DEFENDER

HUMAN RESOURCESSHERIFF - CORONER

INFORMATION SERVICES AND TECHNOLOGY

RETIREMENT

PUBLIC HEALTH

MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE

USE

SOCIAL SERVICES

PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION

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Budget Summary

C O U N T Y B U D G E TThe budget is a comprehensive financial plan that funds the County’s work plan for the fiscal year. As part of the budget process, departments evaluate their accomplishments for the preceding year and determine next steps for the coming fiscal year to further implement the goals and desired outcomes of the department. The Proposed Budget document articulates the intentions of the departments for the coming year, detailing long-term goals and objectives and the associated initiatives for which funding is being requested.

B U D G E T C A L E N D A RDeliverable Key DateDepartment budget requests Mid-FebruaryBudget Change Proposals Mid-FebruaryMid-Year Budget Review Late FebruaryPerformance Plan workshops MarchRecommended Budget released 1st week of JuneBudget hearings Mid-June

B U D G E T P R O C E S SThe County Administrator oversees the County budget process, including the coordination and review of department budget requests and the final preparation of a Proposed Budget for the Board of Supervisors’ consideration and adoption in June.

The County operates on a fiscal year basis that begins July 1st of each year, and ends the following June 30th. Beginning in FY 2014-16, the County implemented a two-year budget planning process, however the Board of Supervisors approves the budget annually. Preparation of the annual budget requires an intensive effort covering a period of over nine months. Ongoing dialogue with the departments, advisory commissions and the Board of Supervisors is critical to the development of a meaningful budget document.

After final adoption, the Board may revise the budget. Departments cannot amend the budget without approval by the Board of Supervisors, except for adjustments between accounts within a department and fund that do not increase the overall appropriations of a department. However, as departments identify new or additional revenue sources or needs throughout the year, the Board may consider budget revision requests. The County Administrator recommends to the Board on a monthly basis any budget adjustments requiring an increase in appropriation, including any transfer of funds from one department or fund to another. In addition, the County Administrator’s staff meets regularly with departments to discuss the budget modifications and potential needs throughout the year, with a thorough review at mid-year.

N E T C O U N T Y C O S TMany County programs do not have a dedicated revenue stream to fully offset operating costs. As a result, these programs are supported by general purpose revenues such as property or sales taxes. Some departmental programs are able to generate substantial revenues, such as state or federal reimbursem*nts for social services programs. The County also uses general purpose revenues to provide a required match to receive these state or federal revenues. When appropriate, departments charge fees for services, such as the building inspection program, which is completely cost-covered. The difference between program expenditures and program revenues is known as the net county cost (NCC). The NCC is the amount the County must fund from the General Fund to support the program, and is funded through a variety of discretionary financial sources available to the County including property and sales tax, vehicle license registration fees and prior-year fund balance. The County’s reliance on NCC increases as the County loses revenue from state and federal sources, requiring the County to increase department or general purpose revenues, or to reduce expenditures.

B U D G E T O V E R V I E W

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Budget Summary

17

FY 2015-16 Approved Budget Expenditures Revenues Net County Cost FTEHealth and Human ServicesGeneral Administration $4,882,337 $0 $4,882,337 65.75Mental Health and Substance Use Services $57,490,110 $42,743,932 $14,746,178 135.34Public Health Services $35,573,430 $26,003,693 $9,569,737 108.43Social Services $77,676,963 $60,182,730 $17,494,233 323.25

Service Area Total $175,622,840 $128,930,355 $46,692,485 632.78Public SafetyChild Support Services $5,202,524 $5,202,524 $0 31.62 District Attorney $17,764,129 $8,645,569 $9,118,560 81.00 Marin County Fire $22,661,178 $14,702,313 $7,958,865 86.14 Probation $21,187,403 $10,654,816 $10,532,587 111.97 Public Defender $7,432,893 $1,824,692 $5,608,201 37.50 Sheriff - Coroner $66,790,639 $25,519,808 $41,270,831 309.30

Service Area Total $141,038,766 $66,549,722 $74,489,044 657.53 Administration and FinanceBoard of Supervisors $3,518,251 $71,996 $3,446,255 21.00 County Administrator $16,852,853 $10,549,759 $6,303,094 17.00 Elections $3,385,187 $698,000 $2,687,187 10.00 Assessor-Recorder-County Clerk $10,213,852 $3,973,632 $6,240,220 77.00 Department of Finance $8,590,487 $3,506,129 $5,084,358 63.78 County Counsel $5,224,562 $525,190 $4,699,372 23.00 Human Resources $6,034,312 $1,000 $6,033,312 36.30 Information Services and Technology $20,290,511 $2,337,042 $17,953,469 104.00 Retirement $2,666,348 $2,666,348 $0 20.00

Service Area Total $76,776,363 $24,329,096 $52,447,267 372.08 Community Development and Public WorksCommunity Development Agency $15,895,685 $11,323,354 $4,572,331 84.50 Department of Public Works $46,426,923 $32,061,881 $14,365,042 233.53

Service Area Total $62,322,608 $43,385,235 $18,937,373 318.03 Community ServicesAgriculture, Weights and Measures $2,419,466 $1,055,525 $1,363,941 13.00 Farm Advisor $278,052 $3,500 $274,552 2.00 Marin County Parks $19,659,797 $12,706,718 $6,953,079 79.25 Culture and Visitor Services $3,893,282 $2,327,150 $1,566,132 16.50 Marin County Free Library $16,850,644 $14,441,630 $2,409,014 102.74

Service Area Total $43,101,241 $30,534,523 $12,566,718 213.49 Non-DepartmentalService Area Total $20,576,166 $189,812,551 ($169,236,385) 0.00Grand Total $519,437,984 $483,541,482 $35,896,502 2,193.92

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18

Budget Summary

RevenuesTaxes $204,390,916 39%Licenses, Permits, Fees $13,752,338 3%Fines, Forfeitures and Fees $9,054,110 2%Revenues from Use $4,829,465 1%Intergovernmental Revenues $180,120,009 35%Charges for Current Services $48,532,234 9%Miscellaneous Revenues $22,862,410 4%Use of Fund Balance $35,896,502 7%

Total Revenues $519,437,984

B U D G E T C H A R T S - F Y 2 0 1 5 - 1 6 A P P R O V E D B U D G E T

A L L F U N D S

ExpendituresSalaries and Benefits $317,364,884 61%Services and Supplies $133,896,846 26%

Other Charges $61,960,989 12%Contingency Reserves $6,215,265 1%

Total Expenditures $519,437,984

Taxes

Charges for Current Services

Miscellaneous Revenues

Intergovernmental Revenue

Use of Fund Balance

Licenses, Permits, Fees

Fine, Forfeitures and Fees Revenues from Use

Salaries and Benefits

Other Charges

Services and Supplies

Contingency Reserves

Revenues and Expenditures by Type

Revenues

Expendi tures

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Budget Summary

19

Intergovernmental Revenue

Use of Fund Balance

Licenses, Permits, Fees

Revenues from Use

Services and Supplies

Contingency Reserves

Health and Human Services

Public Safety

Administration and Finance

Community Development and Public Works

Community Services

Non Departmental

Use of Fund Balance

Net County Cost

Net County CostHealth and Human Services $46,876,262 24%Public Safety $74,305,267 38%Administration and Finance $52,268,615 26%Community Development and Public Works

$16,958,489 9%

Community Services $6,876,812 3%Total $197,285,445

G E N E R A L F U N D

Service Area

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20

Budget Summary

Expendi tures

Revenues

RevenuesHealth and Human Services $128,930,355 25%Public Safety $66,549,722 13%Administration and Finance $24,329,096 5%Community Development and Public Works

$43,385,235 8%

Community Services $30,534,523 6%Non Departmental $189,812,551 37%Use of Fund Balance $35,899,502 7%

Total Revenues $519,437,984

ExpendituresHealth and Human Services $175,622,840 34%Public Safety $141,038,766 27%Administration and Finance 76,776,363 15%Community Development and Public Works

62,322,608 12%

Community Services 43,101,241 8%Non Departmental 20,576,166 4%

Total Expenditures $519,437,984

A L L F U N D S

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DEPARTMENTPERFORMANCE PLANS

MISSION STATEMENT | DEPARTMENT OVERVIEWGOALS | INITIATIVES | PERFORMANCE MEASURES

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Agriculture, Weights and MeasuresP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Department Overview

The Agriculture, Weights and Measures Department includes the following program areas: • Agriculture• Weights and Measures

The Agriculture division’s mission is achieved through implementation of sustainable agricultural and regulatory programs, including organic certification; invasive pest prevention, management, and eradication; education on Integrated Pest Management (IPM) principles and strategies; pesticide use enforcement, direct marketing, nursery, seed, egg, and apiary inspections; and non-lethal Livestock Protection Program. Additionally, the department collaborates with the Marin Farm Advisor/UCCE Cooperative Extension on sustainable agricultural issues to support the agricultural industry.

The Weights and Measures division’s mission is achieved through price accuracy of a commodity at the time of sale to ensure that every person is receiving the lowest, and not greater than the posted price, through testing and sealing gas pumps, electric, taxi, water, liquid petroleum, and other similar devices; testing of all weighing devices such as scales at grocery check-out stations, deli scales, and livestock scales; Point of Sale Systems; inspection of advertising, signage, and labeling on petroleum and automotive products; and oversight of service agents that are responsible for repairing commercial devices.

Recent Accomplishments

• Captured two glassy-winged sharpshooters on incoming plant shipments

• Implemented a new daily program to track inspections, hours, and other data for mandatory state reporting

• Equipped all field staff with field tablet computers and smart phones, devices which enable inspectors to work more efficiently from mobile and remote sites

• Successfully approved the first vineyard development site as a part of the vineyard ordinance developed by the department in 2011

• Department employee was named the Marin County Employee of the Year for 2015

Key Challenges and Outstanding Issues

• Continuing to keep unwanted exotic and damaging pests out of the County, including invasive plants and injurious insects and diseases

• Enforcing pesticide laws and regulations, as well as providing education and outreach to industry and the community on how to safely and effectively use pesticides when they must be used

• Providing outstanding environmental and consumer protection through fair and professional enforcement of laws and regulations in a frequently changing regulatory environment

• Ensuring an effective succession plan for upcoming retirements

• Evaluating current office space to meet staff work area needs

• Working productively to ensure the department continues to meet state and federal mandates, while maximizing limited revenue resources

• Maintaining quality services with reduced resources

FY 2015-16 Approved Budget

Department FTE 13.00Revenues $1,055,525Expenditures $2,419,466

Net County Cost $1,363,941

The mission of the Agriculture, Weights and Measures Department is to serve the public’s interest by ensuring equity in the marketplace, promoting and protecting agriculture, protecting environmental quality and the health and welfare of Marin County’s residents.

marincounty.org/ag

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Agriculture, Weights and MeasuresP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Goal I: Prevent the introduction and spread of exotic and invasive species

Goal II: Ensure pesticides are used safely and appropriately

Goal III: Encourage sustainable agricultural practices

Goal IV: Maintain a fair and equitable marketplace

♦ Hold meetings with partner organizations, the agricultural industry, and other groups to address invasive weed issues in Marin County, with a focus on developing strategies to address Wooly Distaff Thistle and Purple Starthistle

♦ Identify plant pests and recommend Integrated Pest Management (IPM) approaches for long-term control such as the use of cultural, biological, and mechanical control methods, with a focus on Asian Citrus Psyllid, Bagrada bug, Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, and Glassy-winged Sharpshooter

♦ Continue to work closely with industry on submitting pesticide use reports online through the statewide software system CalAg Permits, as pesticide use reporting will likely become mandatory within a few years

♦ Create an annual Consumer Protection Report beginning calendar year 2017 to inform the community how we protect them every day through the programs we enforce

♦ Verify Marin Organic Certified Agriculture (MOCA) operations are complying with new Organic System Plans to ensure the program overall maintains compliance with the National Organic Program requirements

♦ Continue to collaborate with the Farm Advisor, the Marin Carbon Project, and other organizations to develop strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions on the local level

♦ Encourage staff to take license exams, attend deputy area group meetings, conferences, and professional development courses and trainings

♦ Ensure 100 percent of staff attend at least one course and/or training by June 2018

♦ Provide increased efficiencies through office automation by converting all remaining hard copy department forms to electronic versions by June 2018

Initiatives

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Agriculture, Weights and MeasuresP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Performance Measures 2012-13 Actual

2013-14 Actual

2014-15 Actual

2015-16 Target

2016-17 Target

2017-18 Target

MOCANumber of operations in the Marin Organic Certified Agriculture (MOCA) program1 56 52 54 54 54 54Number of acres organically farmed2 36,628 33,775 32,471 32,000 32,000 32,000

Consumer ProtectionNumber of retail fuel (e.g., gas, diesel, etc.) meters inspected3 495 1,186 1,139 1,150 1,150 1,150Percent accuracy of fuel meters3 97.4% 99.0% 99.5% 99.0% 99.0% 99.0%Number of retail businesses inspected to verify compliance with advertised or posted pricing4 225 234 206 215 215 215Percent of businesses complying with scanner regulations4 78.6% 80.1% 81.1% 81.0% 82.0% 82.0%Number of taxi meters inspected5 121 92 137 95 95 95Percent accuracy of taxi meters5 98.4% 97.8% 97.1% 98.0% 98.0% 98.0%Number of computing and counter scales inspected6 347 443 435 410 410 410Percent accuracy of computing and counter scales6 97.1% 95.0% 95.9% 96.0% 96.0% 96.0%

Pesticide Enforcement and ManagementNumber of pesticide complaints received7 6 7 8 N/A N/A N/ANumber of confirmed non-agricultural related pesticide illnesses8 6 3 2 N/A N/A N/A

Story Behind Performance

MOCA 1. The Marin Organic Certified Agriculture (MOCA) program has provided organic certification services to local ranchers and crop producers for more than 15 years. This program has resulted in our consumers having healthy organic farm fresh produce and products readily available at our local farmers’ markets, restaurants, farm stands, and local stores.

2. Total acreage decreased from FY 2013-14 to FY 2014-15 due to a dairy switching to another organic certifier, while the program added two smaller operations during the same timeframe. For FY 2016-17 and FY 2017-18 Targets, the department intends to maintain the current level of operations and organic acreage in the MOCA program since staff is at full capacity.

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Agriculture, Weights and MeasuresP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Story Behind Performance

Consumer Protection

3. The department inspects retail fuel meters routinely to ensure consumers are getting what they paid for when they fill their vehicle tank with fuel (e.g., gas, diesel, etc.). Typically these meters are accurate to 98 percent or higher. Most often consumers contact our department because they are able to put more fuel in their tank than what the vehicle owner’s manual states, but most of the time this is not an issue with the meter but rather because gas tanks are not calibrated units of measure. In the uncommon event there are issues with a fuel meter, it is immediately red-tagged and placed out of service until it has been properly repaired. While actual compliance rates are not directly under the department’s control, targets are based on recent trends.

4. The department also inspects stores to make sure the consumer is receiving the lowest advertised or posted price. Most of the stores in Marin use bar code readers, scanners, and price look-up systems, which have replaced individual prices on items at most stores. This area has become more important because many or all stores of national chains determine their pricing through a central computer; an error in one store is an error in them all. Inspectors are also responsible for enforcing the County’s plastic bag ordinance in unincorporated areas. While actual compliance rates are not directly under the department’s control, targets are based on recent trends.

5. The department tests all taxi meters in the County on an annual basis. These meters are normally about 98 percent accurate. If a meter is found out of tolerance, it is immediately red-tagged, and not put back into service until properly repaired. While actual compliance rates are not directly under the department’s control, targets are based on recent trends. While actual compliance rates are not directly under the department’s control, targets are based on recent trends.

6. The department verifies the accuracy of computer and counter scales at grocery stores, delis, and farmers markets. Consumers often use these scales for fruits, vegetables, meats and other food items that are sold by weight. These scales are typically around 96 percent accurate. While actual compliance rates are not directly under the department’s control, targets are based on recent trends.

Members of the public are encouraged to call the consumer protection line at 415-473-7888 with any concerns related to pricing issues.

Pesticide Enforcement and Management

7. Our department oversees and enforces the use of pesticides in the County. California has the most rigorous set of regulations in the world, and the department helps protect residents, visitors, applicators, and the environment by ensuring pesticides are properly handled and stored, and commercial applicators are trained and licensed. This measure of pesticide complaints our department receives represent any calls that may, or may not, be pesticide related.

8. The number of probable or definite non-agricultural related pesticide illnesses measure is determined by the California Department of Pesticide Regulation (CDPR). This information is available to the public on CDPR’s website at http://www.cdpr.ca.gov/docs/whs/pisp.htm. In the last five years, there were no probable or definite agriculture related illnesses, and therefore it is not represented as a measure.

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Assessor – Recorder – County ClerkP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Core Values

As we carry out our mission, we collectively and individually strive to uphold the County values of respect, trust, integrity, diversity, equality, excellence, accountability, innovation and collaboration.

Vision

The Marin County Assessor-Recorder-County Clerk (ARCC) is a statewide leader and model of excellence regarding technology, ethics, customer service, best practices and standards. ARCC strives to continually pursue education, training and professional development for its staff, as well as maximize technology and data analysis.

Department Overview

The Assessor-Recorder-County Clerk’s primary responsibilities, as governed by law, pertain to the preparation of the assessment roll, including, but not limited to, all locally assessable real, business and personal property within the County; the recordation, maintenance and preservation of official, vital and historic records; and the processing of oaths of office, marriage licenses, performance of civil ceremonies and the issuance and registration of a variety of legal documents. Some of the services the department offers include: • Administering property tax law to produce the

assessment roll • Establishing and maintaining a set of countywide maps

for assessment purposes • Determining assessment change in ownership,

exemptions and exclusions • Conducting audits of business and personal property

• Participating in Assessment Appeal Board hearings and/or court-related proceedings

• Recording, indexing and maintaining documents and maps pertaining to real property

• Archiving official records and making birth, death, marriage and military discharge records available

• Providing certified copies of documents and maps • Collecting Documentary Transfer Tax • Issuing public and confidential marriage licenses • Performing civil marriage ceremonies • Processing fictitious business names • Registering domestic partnerships, notary oaths,

professional photocopiers and process servers • Maintaining oaths of office and the roster of public

agencies• Providing excellent customer service at three public

counters• Offering expert information regarding tax assessment,

recording and clerk processes in a timely and responsive manner

• Providing representation in statewide professional organizations in all three office disciplines

FY 2015-16 Approved Budget

Department FTE 77.00Revenues $3,973,632Expenditures $10,213,852

Net County Cost $6,240,220

The mission of the Marin County Assessor-Recorder-County Clerk is to uphold state law and local ordinances with integrity in a fair, efficient and consistent manner, while providing excellent customer service in the areas of Assessment, Recording and Clerk processes.

marincounty.org/arcc

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Assessor – Recorder – County ClerkP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Recent Accomplishments

• Completed FY 2015-16 assessment roll on time• Tracked changes to laws and regulations in Assessor,

Recorder and County Clerk• Completed technical infrastructure to implement

Electronic Recording in Spring 2016• Implemented the County Assessor’s Personal Property

System (CAPPS), which began the process of converting several independent databases to a web-based/SQL server

• Rescanned official records from 1973-1998, resulting in enhanced viewing quality for the public

• Filled key positions essential to meeting legal mandates• Created internal safety procedures and provided

training to all staff• Provided excellent customer service at three public

counters and via phone, email and website• Resolved approximately 350 assessment appeals

Key Challenges and Outstanding Issues

• Adapting to unpredictable market volatility and the impact of the recent economic recovery on staff workload

• Maintaining or upgrading the Assessor/Tax Collector database system in five to seven years with pre-planning beginning in one to three years

• Expected retirements of key personnel with expertise in information services and technology and supervision/management in one to three years

• Pending legislation recommendations and changes in Assessor, Recorder and County Clerk

• The need to ensure data security coupled with the increasing demand for open data

• Serving a sophisticated public with increasingly complex inquiries and services

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Assessor – Recorder – County ClerkP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Goal I: Meet legal mandates to ensure uniformity, equity and fair treatment of taxpayers and the public, including: closing the assessment roll on time to enable the collection of taxes to support local schools, cities and the County; maintaining public records, documents of real property and other documents; and issuing marriage licenses, fictitious business name statements and performing civil ceremonies

Goal II: Enhance operational effectiveness and efficiency

Goal III: Invest in our staff — the department’s number one resource

♦ Complete 100% of the assessment roll each July 1 as mandated by the California Constitution and the Revenue Taxation Code

♦ Participate in quarterly Labor-Management Partnership to improve communication with the goal of creating a positive and productive environment where staff are empowered to express their needs and participate in the continual improvement of business operations in FY 2016-17

♦ Prepare succession and leadership opportunities for staff to learn, grow and advance in FY 2016-17

♦ Meet legal mandates to produce the Recorder’s Grantor-Grantee index within two business days of recording a document per the California Statute and Marin County Code

♦ Review fees to ensure fair pricing structure and report findings and suggested next steps to the County Administrator by December 2016

♦ Prepare, train and support staff to successfully transition to new technologies and processes countywide and departmentally

♦ Partner with Information Services and Technology (IST) to review and update policies and procedures to ensure data security. Train staff on policies and their role in data confidentiality and security

♦ Meet with IST quarterly to discuss data security in FY 2016-17

♦ Provide written documentation to staff on policies and procedures in FY 2017-18

♦ Ensure that 100 percent of employees receive a meaningful yearly performance evaluation each calendar year.

♦ All employees have TalentQuest performance evaluation by June 2018

♦ In partnership with Human Resources (HR), provide five hours of training in best practices related to performance evaluation

♦ Increase the number of employees cross-training from eight percent to ten percent in FY 2017-18

Initiatives

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Assessor – Recorder – County ClerkP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Performance Measures 2012-13 Actual

2013-14 Actual

2014-15 Actual

2015-16 Projection

2016-17 Projection

2017-18 Projection

Assessment RollTotal number of properties on the secured equalized assessment roll 96,344 96,321 96,243 96,237 96,200 96,200Total number of properties on the unsecured equalized assessment roll N/A N/A N/A 13,945 13,950 13,950Number of real property parcels in a “decline status” on the equalized assessment roll 22,806 20,686 14,651 9,945 6,500 N/A

Performance Measures 2013 Actual

2014 Actual

2015 Actual

2016 Projection

2017 Projection

2018 Projection

Real Estate TrendsMedian price of a single family home (detached) 882,369 999,000 1,100,100 N/A N/A N/ANumber of residential sales per year (detached and attached) 3,452 3,348 3,289 3,300 N/A N/A

Public Records ProcessingTotal number of documents examined, recorded, scanned and indexed (processed) 102,537 68,317 67,765 69,000 69,000 69,000Total number of Fictitious Business Name filings 2,672 2,643 2,513 2,518 2,500 2,500Total number of marriages performed 622 655 586 600 600 600

Story Behind Performance

Assessment Roll The number of parcels in a decline status has decreased as the local housing market has rebounded. Due to economic volatility, the Assessor does not set a FY 2017-18 projection for this measure.

Real Estate Trends These measures are based on market activity and the Assessor does not set future projections.

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Board of SupervisorsP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Department Overview

Under California’s constitution and laws, the Board of Supervisors serves as the legislative and executive body of Marin County. The members are elected by district and are required to live in the districts they represent. Supervisors’ terms are four years and two or three supervisors are elected every two years.

The Supervisors also serve as the governing board of the Open Space District, Marin County Free Library, flood control zones, lighting district, County service areas, and sewer maintenance districts. The Board enacts ordinances, determines policies, adopts budgets, sets salaries, ensures that mandated functions are properly discharged, and supervises County departments.

Board of Supervisors includes the following programs: • Board of Supervisors • Clerk of the Board

Recent Accomplishments

• Since FY 2012-13, reduced unfunded retiree liabilities by $243 million, including $94 million in discretionary accelerated payments

• Achieved AAA bond rating while also refinancing bonded indebtedness to generate $25.5 million for the County’s highest priority building repairs

• Continued to fully fund retiree health benefits, with over $56 million set aside in an irrevocable trust to enable the County to fully fund retiree health benefits over the next 30 years

• Implemented roads resurfacing program that overlaid or seal coated 25 centerline miles of County road in FY 2015-16

• Approved labor agreements that phase out the County’s contribution toward employees’ share of pension costs

• Adopted the County’s 5 Year Business Plan, with a vision of working together to be a more responsive government

• Completed and adopted the 2015 Climate Action Plan Update

• Completed Vulnerability Assessment for coastal areas under the Collaborating Sea-level Marin Adaptation Response Team (C-SMART)

• Adopted a pharmaceutical “take-back” ordinance requiring companies to manage and fund a comprehensive countywide program to collect and dispose of unwanted, unused and expired over-the-counter and prescription drugs

• Developed a comprehensive Road and Trail Management Plan (RTMP) and Environmental Impact Report (EIR) to direct future use and management of roads and trails on the Open Space District’s 34 preserves

FY 2015-16 Approved Budget

Department FTE 21.00Revenues $71,996Expenditures $3,518,251

Net County Cost $3,446,255

The mission of the County of Marin is to provide excellent services that support healthy, safe, and sustainable communities; preserve Marin’s unique environmental heritage; and encourage meaningful participation in the governance of the County by all.

marincounty.org/bos

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Board of SupervisorsP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Countywide

Goal I: Create a community that supports equity and mitigates the effects of income equality

Goal II: Make cost-effective investments to maintain our road infrastructure

Goal III: Create a sustainable community, including responsible environmental stewardship of our natural environment, addressing climate change, and efforts to adapt to sea level rise

Goal IV: Preserve affordable housing

Goal V: Implement the 5 Year Business Plan, focusing on creating an inclusive organization; providing enhanced public service through innovation; investing in career growth and development; and strengthening communication and building trust with increased community engagement

Goal VI: Create a financially sustainable budget that addresses long-term liabilities and preserves core services and community values

Clerk of Board

Goal VII: Ensure that the County’s business is conducted openly and information is freely available to assist the public in understanding and participating in the County’s decision-making processes

Goal VIII: Enhance public access to County Advisory Boards/Commission Information, including posting meeting information online regarding agendas, minutes, and reports

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Board of SupervisorsP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Countywide

♦ Prevent homelessness for those who are precariously housed, with targeted investments in the highest priority areas, including the preservation of existing affordable housing

♦ Ensure diversity at all levels of the organization and improve talent attraction processes to ensure the best quality candidate pool

♦ Partner with the Marin Housing Authority to create financial incentives for landlords who rent to low-income tenants in FY 2016-17

♦ Identify and explore opportunities to develop longer term and more effective adult mental health service facilities, including a 10-12 bed transitional residential facility and a dedicated funding source for acute inpatient placements

♦ Increase the County’s ongoing investment in road maintenance to steadily improve pavement conditions

♦ Support energy efficiency initiatives to reduce County greenhouse gas emissions, including supplementing current incentives for employees to use public transit options and developing local transportation services for Sonoma-Marin Area Rail Transit (SMART) station users

♦ Enhance our public website and increase use of social media to better engage and inform the public

♦ Increase online options for the community to conduct business with the County, including the top five online payments and top six mobile apps implemented by FY 2017-18

♦ Increase the County’s pension rate stabilization reserve with continued investments of available one-time funds

Clerk of Board

♦ Explore options to preserve and restore historic minute books, including digitizing records and incorporating historic records into the County’s document management platform, to improve public and staff access

♦ Expand on-line information related to adopted ordinances, including providing additional detail regarding ordinance modifications

♦ Cross-train staff in the Assessment Appeals Board (AAB) functions to ensure hearings on Applications for Changed Assessment are held on a timely basis given increased workloads and limited resources

♦ Implement a new AAB database developed through a partnership with Information Services and Technology to provide greater cross-departmental resources on applications for changed assessment

♦ Partner with Information Services and Technology to improve on-line resources for applying to positions on Board-appointed commissions

Initiatives

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County Administrator’s OfficeP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Department Overview

The County Administrator is appointed by, and operates directly under, the Board of Supervisors serving the legislative function of the Board by providing research, information, and recommendations, and serving the executive function by providing management assistance. The County Administrator also oversees the Administrative Services departments, including Department of Finance, Human Resources, Information Services and Technology, and Elections Department, and formally serves as Clerk of the Board and oversees Clerk of the Board staff. The County Administrator’s Office (CAO) Management and Budget program works with departments to annually prepare the County’s budget and monitors implementation of the budget as approved by the Board of Supervisors. Additionally, the program oversees the implementation of County strategic planning and the Managing for Results (MFR) performance management system. This program also coordinates the County’s legislative efforts, and is responsible for countywide communication planning and the dissemination of public and employee information. The Risk Management program works to protect the property, human, fiscal and environmental assets of the County. This program administers insurance, workers’ compensation, safety, ergonomics and other matters relating to the County’s management of risk. The Facilities Planning and Development program is responsible for overseeing countywide facilities management and capital planning efforts.

In addition to the above programs, the County Administrator oversees a number of special districts, the Animal Services contract between the County, Marin cities and towns, and the Marin Humane Society for animal control and shelter services, the Alternative Defender Contract, the Frank Lloyd Wright Conservancy Commission, and serves on the Marin General Services Authority.

FY 2015-16 Approved Budget

Department FTE 17.00Revenues $10,549,759Expenditures $16,852,853

Net County Cost $6,303,094

The mission of the County Administrator’s Office is to lead a responsive government through sound fiscal management, effective services, proactive communication, and a supportive employee workplace

marincounty.org/cao

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County Administrator’s OfficeP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Recent Accomplishments

• Led development of the County’s 5 Year Business Plan 2015-2020, with a vision of working together to be a more responsive government

• Since FY 2012-13, worked with the Board of Supervisors to reduce unfunded retiree liabilities by $243 million, including $94 million in discretionary accelerated payments

• Oversaw the selection of Tyler-MUNIS to replace the current SAP business software system

• Developed the County’s first accessible, multi-media annual report for residents

• Won national communication branding award from the City-County Communications and Marketing Association (3CMA) for Marin County Identity Style Guide

• Led Department Head Workers’ Compensation working group to ensure effective coordination and risk mitigation

• Leased new space to private tenants and reduced lease payments by relocating County staff to 1600 Los Gamos from leased space at various locations

• Completed agreements with Marin General Hospital for parking arrangements for County staff, and installation of elevator in County/hospital shared facility

Key Challenges and Outstanding Issues

• Assisting administrative departments in managing staffing and resource demands required by the Administrative Technologies of Marin (ATOM) financial software replacement project

• Assisting administrative departments in implementing the County’s 5 Year Business Plan, as well as Information Services and Technology’s (IST) 5 Year Strategic Plan

• Working with departments to address emerging community service needs while maintaining a balanced budget

• Managing significant facilities and space planning projects as a result of the Sheriff’s Office move to 1600 Los Gamos and consequent reconfiguration and assignment of space at the Civic Center

• Increased focus/attention on income inequality/equity countywide

• Ongoing implementation of Risk Management program legacy plan to replace retiring staff

• Improving communications efforts to identify and reach people of all demographic groups with effective outreach strategies, as well as identifying best return on investment in social media platforms

• Coordinating efforts to identify and develop a new site for a community detoxification program

• Supporting departments in “rebooting” the County’s Managing for Results (MFR) performance measurement program, with the goal of more meaningful performance measures and goals that better communicate outcomes to the public

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County Administrator’s OfficeP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Goal I: Support the Board of Supervisors and County departments in developing key priorities that result in effective services to the community and better communicate program outcomes

Goal II: Ensure the County’s long-term financial stability and protect County assets

Goal III: Facilitate the County’s efforts to become a high performance organization that is well-managed and achieves results in addressing community and organizational needs

Goal IV: Support and enhance a professional, cohesive County Administrator’s Office to provide leadership to the County organization

Goal V: Provide a safe, healthy and productive work environment at County facilities

Goal VI: Enhance proactive communication and expand the County’s outreach to residents and its employees

♦ Lead implementation of the County’s 5 Year Business Plan, ensuring success with achievement of an action plan, performance metrics, and a communication strategy – including significant process within the first two years

♦ Initiate Phase II of the multi-year effort to improve and “reboot” the County’s Managing for Results program - including facilitating the MFR Working Group’s effort to develop a strategic framework as well as community indicators in 2016

♦ Develop and implement a community survey in FY 2016-17

♦ Coordinate countywide equity initiatives with pilot departments in FY 2016-17 and develop a structure for equity initiatives throughout the organization

♦ Develop an annual address for employees in 2016 which includes strategic focus for the year, County values, and important status updates on County programs and services

♦ Increase the County’s presence on social media to better engage and inform residents and employees

♦ Consistent with the 5 Year Business Plan, implement an employee development or coaching program for each CAO employee in FY 2016-17

♦ Coordinate the County’s design and approval process for working with the Agricultural Institute of Marin to create a permanent farmers’ market at the Civic Center Campus site near the future Sonoma-Marin Area Rail Transit (SMART) station

♦ Coordinate with Administrative Services departments to mitigate workers’ compensation costs with a case/claim specific strategy, temporary modified duty, nurse case managers for complex claims, utilization review of proposed medical and pharmacy bills, and evaluation of potential policy or labor agreement changes where appropriate

♦ Coordinate strategies for general liability claims management with County Counsel in 2016 and 2017, and maintain accurate case reserves and loss histories for optimum insurance program renewals

♦ Implement a successful Building Evacuation Response Team plan for the Civic Center campus in 2016, including lockdown and shelter-in-place protocols, with appropriate training, drills and scalability to off-campus locations

Initiatives

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County Administrator’s OfficeP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Performance Measures 2012-13 Actual

2013-14 Actual

2014-15 Actual

2015-16 Target

2016-17 Target

2017-18 Target

Customer Service and Employee DevelopmentPercent of departmental customers rating overall CAO service as “good” or “excellent” N/A N/A N/A N/A 90% 90%Percent of employees receiving an annual evaluation N/A N/A 89% 100% 100% 100%

BudgetPercent of budget reserved for unanticipated emergencies 5.70% 6.60% 8.20% 7.00% 7.50% 7.50%Marin County Bond Rating

Moody’s Aa2 Aaa Aaa Aaa Aaa AaaFitch AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAAStandard and Poor’s AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA

Risk ManagementNumber of lost work days for non-sworn employees 1,579 657 640 700 700 700Number of lost work days for sworn employees 1,476 1,441 1,211 1,000 1,000 1,000Percent of employees returning to work within 30 days after injury 88% 87% 88% 88% 89% 89%

CommunicationsAnnual number of news releases distributed by County Administrator’s Office 32 204 284 150 250 250Total number of Marin County Government’s Twitter “followers” (www.twitter.com/maringov) 1,916 3,075 4,357 4,000 4,750 5,250Total number of Marin County Government’s Facebook page “likes” (www.fb.com/countyofmarin) 503 1,195 2,114 1,800 3,250 3,500Number of videos added to the Marin County Government YouTube channel (www.youtube.com/maringchannel)1 43 22 4 48 10 12Annual number of Marin County Government YouTube and Facebook video views2 167,258 75,276 61,317 75,000 80,000 100,000

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County Administrator’s OfficeP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Story Behind Performance

Budget In June 2014, the Board voted to allocate $5.5 million in one-time revenues to build up General Fund reserves for future uncertainties. The one-time revenues were the result of repayments by the State of California for pre-2004 unfunded mandate costs. Targets for FY 2016-17 and FY 2017-18 are lower than the FY 2014-15 actuals due to known growth factors in the overall County budget; however, a 7.5 percent reserve ratio falls within the range of best financial practices.

Risk Management An important goal in the management of workers’ compensation is to return employees to their usual and customary duties as quickly as possible. Employees able to return to work benefit both the employee and employer and help to maintain a steady work force. Given the anticipated retirement of the entire Risk Management program by 2017, performance measures beginning FY 2017-18 may require modification pending staffing and organization of the program.

Communications 1. The number of actual videos decreased in FY 2014-15 as a result of transitioning to a new video vendor located outside of Marin County, shifting communication strategy (i.e., using written forms of communication to address hot topics requiring a tight turnaround), and other departments began making their own videos that they uploaded to their own YouTube channel (for example, Health and Human Services produced 28 videos that are featured on their YouTube channel).

2. The actual views decreased significantly from FY 2012-13 to FY 2013-14 because we produced 50 percent fewer videos. The annual views per video are consistent for both those years. We expect the views per video to increase significantly going forward because we plan to upload relevant videos directly to Facebook.

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Child Support ServicesP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Department Overview

Children rely on their parents for the financial, emotional, and medical support they need to be healthy and successful. The Child Support Services program works with parents and guardians - both those receiving child support and those ordered to pay support - to ensure children and families receive court-ordered financial and medical support.

The Department of Child Support Services (DCSS) operates under Title IV-D of the Social Security Act and is funded by federal and state funds.

The Enhanced Court Collections (ECC) program provides collection services for delinquent court fines and fees. Although ECC is a separate program from Child Support Services, it operates under the administrative oversight of DCSS.

The Child Support Services program is financed by federal and state funds and does not receive funding from the County. The State Department of Child Support Services has held our local program funding flat for 11 consecutive years, which has resulted in less staff available to provide these valuable services to our community. The State DCSS Director is currently reviewing the local program allocation strategy for possible changes.

Recent Accomplishments

• Achieved the second highest rank in overall performance within the State of California for federal fiscal year 2015 (October 2014 - September 2015), making this the 12th consecutive year of being ranked among the top ten performing local child support agencies in the state

• Ranked number one in collections on current support within the State of California for federal fiscal year 2015

• Ranked number one for cases with support orders established within the State of California for federal fiscal year 2015

• Collected and distributed over $11.5 million in current and past due support

• Collected over $3 million in delinquent traffic and criminal court fines and fees

Key Challenges and Outstanding Issues

• Continued flat funding or a decrease in funding will have major impacts on the department’s ability to serve Marin County residents

• Increasing awareness and utilization of the department’s services

FY 2015-16 Approved Budget

Department FTE 31.62Revenues $5,202,524Expenditures $5,202,524

Net County Cost $0

The mission of the Department of Child Support Services is to promote parental responsibility to enhance the well-being of children by providing child support services to establish parentage and collect child support.

marincounty.org/depts/cs

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Child Support ServicesP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Goal I: Ensure that all families in Marin County who need child support services receive them

Goal II: Increase the reliability of child support payments to families in an effort to promote financial stability for children

Goal III: Engage and develop staff by providing a continual feedback strategy

Goal IV: Maintain a successful case referral interface with the courts with positive results

♦ Expand approaches to public outreach and education by building partnerships with Marin County agencies who share our customer base in an effort to ensure that all families in the county who need child support services know that they are available through our department

♦ Initiate engagement and maintain positive relationships with family law practitioners, the court, and community-based organizations to better serve our community

♦ Ensure that all staff receives an annual performance evaluation with an individual performance plan for the following year with a focus on staff development and performance excellence

♦ Maintain a high percentage of current child support collected and distributed within the month that it is due by improving engagement with our customers through increased contact, and by ensuring that child support orders are set appropriately for each family

Initiatives

Performance Measures 2012-13 Actual

2013-14 Actual

2014-15 Actual

2015-16 Target

2016-17 Target

2017-18 Target

Percent of cases with support orders 97.0% 96.5% 97.3% 97.0% 97.0% 97.0%Cumulative percent of current support collected and distributed within the month it is due 76.1% 79.1% 78.5% 78.5% 80.0% 80.0%Percent of cases with arrears that have a collection for arrears 72.6% 73.3% 77.1% 80.6% 80.0% 80.0%Total child, spousal and medical support collected and distributed within the year $12.3M $12.3M $11.3M $12.0M $12.0M $12.0MTotal collections on delinquent court fines and fees for traffic and criminal cases $3.4M $3.2M $3M $3.0M $3.0M $3.0M

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Community Development AgencyP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Department Overview

The Community Development Agency’s (CDA) primary responsibilities pertain to building safety, environmental health, planning, sustainability, and grant administration. In addition to the initiatives outlined in this performance plan, substantial core work is undertaken by CDA in the following program areas:• Administration• Affordable Housing and Federal Grants• Building and Safety • Code Enforcement • Current and Long Range (Community) Planning • Environmental Health Services Consumer Protection • Environmental Health Services Land Use• Environmental Planning • Geographic Information Systems • Marshall Wastewater System Administration and

Maintenance• Richardson’s Bay Regional Agency • Solid Waste and Hazardous Materials Response • Sustainability

Recent Accomplishments

• Completed and adopted the 2015 Climate Action Plan Update

• Launched “Go for Green,” the food facility rating placard system

• Completed Vulnerability Assessment for coastal areas under the Collaborating Sea-level Marin Adaptation Response Team (C-SMART)

• Completed and received state certification for the 2015-2023 Housing Element

• Completed Board of Supervisors workshops to review policy options to preserve housing affordability and prevent displacement

• Completed the 2015-2019 Consolidated Plan for the Community Development Block Grant program and the HOME Investment Partnerships program

• Launched COMET, the permit tracking system for over-the-counter building and planning permits and services

• Completed construction of Phase 2 of the Marshall Community Wastewater project

• Completed and obtained approval of the medical cannabis dispensary ordinance

Key Challenges and Outstanding Issues

• Due to the increased breadth and complexity of state and local regulations, it is challenging to meet applicant expectations and provide timely and cost effective review and inspection services

• Completing the County’s Fair Housing Assessment will involve collaboration between local governments and stakeholders to demonstrate compliance with federal fair housing obligations by analyzing barriers to fair housing choice and local goals and priorities to reduce those barriers

• Beginning the next focused update of the Countywide Plan should be contingent on the completion of current community planning initiatives already in progress, and the scope of the update should be limited to align available resources with the most important priorities

• Implementing COMET, the automated permit tracking system, will continue to compete with staff resources available to carry out core business activities and special projects

• Balancing workloads around the need to upgrade technology will be especially challenging as the County converts to a new financial management system

• The economic recovery and the high cost of living in Marin and the Bay Area make it challenging to recruit and fill vacancies

FY 2015-16 Approved Budget

Department FTE 84.50Revenues $11,323,354Expenditures $15,895,685

Net County Cost $4,572,331

The mission of the Community Development Agency is to protect public health and safety, preserve environmental quality, and support sustainable, diverse communities through excellent and responsive service.

marincounty.org/cda

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Goal I: Prepare and administer equitable and flexible plans, programs and regulations that support a diverse sustainable community

Goal II: Protect and restore environmental resources through effective environmental planning and management of waste and water resources

Goal III: Support healthy and safe communities through responsive and effective inspection, plan review, permit processing and safety programs

Goal IV: Improve customer satisfaction through increased responsiveness and efficiency of permit processing and workload management systems

Goal V: Address staff training and organization development needs to maintain and enhance a satisfying work environment and increase staff retention

♦ Implement strategies to preserve housing affordability in FY 2016-17 that may include landlord incentives, promoting the construction and legalization of second units, and tenant protection programs

♦ Initiate preparation of a Fair Housing Assessment to affirmatively further fair housing choice in FY 2016-17 and prepare a draft Assessment in FY 2017-18

♦ Initiate focused update to the Countywide Plan in FY 2016-17, limiting the scope to Stream Conservation Areas and compliance with new state requirements, pending completion of the Local Coastal Program amendments and two Community Plans

♦ Initiate implementation of select Phase 1 measures of the Climate Action Plan in FY 2016-17, pending availability of funding, and develop an implementation plan for Phase 2 in FY 2017-18

♦ Complete Phase 1 of the C-SMART sea-level rise assessment in FY 2016-17 and develop an implementation plan in FY 2017-18

♦ Complete and obtain certification of amendments to the Local Coastal Program and Implementation Plan-Development Code in FY 2016-17, and develop an implementation plan in FY 2017-18

♦ Initiate Phase 2 of the Bay Waterfront Adaptation Vulnerability Evaluation (BayWAVE) in FY 2017-18 to prepare a multi-jurisdictional Adaption Plan for

non-coastal, bayfront areas subject to sea level rise impacts, pending completion of Phase 1 Vulnerability (Risk) Assessment in FY 2016-17

♦ Complete the Local Agency Management Plan for onsite wastewater disposal systems in FY 2016-17

♦ Complete the feasibility study and initiate an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for the Woodacre Community Wastewater Project in FY 2016-17, contingent on receipt of all approved funding, and complete the EIR and develop implementation plan in FY 2017-18

♦ Complete draft of development code amendments focused on selective topics and compliance with new state requirements in FY 2016-17

♦ Process medical cannabis dispensary licenses in FY 2016-17. Prepare and recommend for adoption amendments to the County’s medical cannabis ordinance to respond to the state’s new medical marijuana regulations in FY 2017-18.

♦ Develop and participate in programs that promote career development opportunities

♦ Work with Board of Supervisors subcommittee to explore an ordinance establishing penalties for construction projects creating unreasonable nuisances

Initiatives

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Community Development AgencyP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Performance Measures 2012-13 Actual

2013-14 Actual

2014-15 Actual

2015-16 Target

2016-17 Target

2017-18 Target

Building SafetyPercentage of initial review for complex building permit applications completed within five weeks1 N/A N/A N/A 50% 50% 60%Percentage of initial review for simple building permit applications completed within two weeks2 74% 76% 37% 50% 50% 60%Percentage of field inspections provided within two business days of the request3 N/A 79% 78% 80% 80% 80%Percentage of express permit applications meeting requirements for same day approval and building permit issuance4 N/A 79% 78% 80% 80% 80%

Environmental Health ServicesPercentage of food facility plan checks completed within 20 days of submittal5 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%Percentage of major food facility establishments inspected twice annually6 64% 65% N/A 80% 80% 80%Percentage of food-borne illness complaints responded to within 24 hours7 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%Posting of updated food facility inspection results within 48 hours of facility inspection8 100% N/A >50% 100% 100% 100%

PlanningAverage number of days to process discretionary permits that are exempt from environmental review9 34 50 49 42 42 42Number of County projects where environmental review (Initial Study/EIR/Addendum/Supplement) has been initiated10 4 10 6 5 5 5

SustainabilityNumber of new certified green businesses11 10 18 11 10 10 10Number of solar installations in Marin per year12 471 725 712 600 600 600Total number of solar kilowatts installed in Marin per year12 (Average 5 kw per residential installation) 2,736 3,807 4,025 3,000 3,000 3,000Total cost of energy, water, and solar improvements financed through the PACE program ($Millions)13 N/A N/A $0.87 $1.50 $1.50 $2.00

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Story Behind Performance

Building Safety 1. Complex building permit applications involve structural modifications and engineering review (e.g. new residence or major addition/remodel). Filling the newly-created Senior Civil Engineer position in FY 2015-16 will expand the staffing capacity from two to three plan reviewers for complex building permit applications. Complex building permit applications represent approximately 10 percent of the annual permit volume, with about 300 permits reviewed annually. Historical performance data were based on a seven-week target.

2. Simple Building Permit applications do not require engineering review (e.g. kitchen remodel). The significant drop in the percentage of simple Building Permit applications that were reviewed within the two-week target between FY 2013-14 and 2014-15 was a result of temporary staffing shortage. The recent addition of a third Plans Examiner position is intended to help by assisting in the review of both simple and express building permit applications. These represent approximately 35 percent of the annual permit volume, with about 1,100 permits reviewed annually.

3. In Fiscal Year 2015-16, CDA replaced two vacant Building Inspector positions. Filling a vacant Supervising Building Inspector position and a newly-created third Building Inspector position is intended to increase the program’s responsiveness to inspection requests. Until the vacancies are filled, we have been relying on a third-party contract inspector in order to meet the two-day target to schedule inspections.

4. In order to meet increased demand, we plan to double the number of days when Express Building Permit review services are available, from two to four mornings per week. This will be contingent on the ability for Marin County Fire to increase staffing at the Permit Center. Express Building Permit applications that meet standards may qualify for same day permit review/issuance (e.g. nonstructural interior remodel, standard retaining walls, and photovoltaic/solar thermal systems).

Environmental Health Services

5. We expect the volume of work related to remodels and upgrades to food facilities (either new facilities or remodels) to keep pace with the improving economic conditions.

6. Since its launch in January 2015, the “Go for Green” food safety placarding program has been well received by the public and food operators. Public interest in food safety and one of the goals for the Environmental Health Services Division to promote safe food handling practices and protect public health are reflected in the performance measure of inspecting major food facilities (e.g. restaurants) twice a year. Anomalies with the reporting structure for the COMET permit tracking system have made it difficult to obtain accurate data. Our ability to meet the performance standards is contingent on the ability to make planned improvements to the permit tracking system.

7. Food-borne illness complaints are a priority for the Consumer Protection program as ensuring food safety is another major goal for EHS. Management’s emphasis to prioritize the response to food borne illness complaints resulted in a 100% attainment of the cycle time target for responding to food borne illness complaints.

8. See footnote 6.

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Story Behind Performance

Planning 9. The performance measure target of six weeks (42 days) from the date of a completed application to issue a decision affects over 80 percent of the approximately 150 to 200 annual planning permits that do not require environmental review. The ability to meet the performance target is contingent on a number of factors, including maintenance of existing staffing levels and the type and complexity of applications.

10. Most minor development applications are exempt from environmental review under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). Since projects that require environmental review generally involve major, complex, and/or controversial development, the estimate is provided as an indicator to depict the overall trend, rather than a target.

Sustainability 11. We expect the number of new certified green businesses in FY 2016-17 and 2017-18 to remain flat, as the program is focusing its limited funding to meet requirements that existing businesses be recertified periodically.

12. As prices for solar energy systems have decreased in recent years, the number of solar installations and total capacity have increased. However, this trend may be slowed in the future as the California Public Utilities Commission considers revisions to the net metering rate structure that may increase consumer costs for solar energy. The potential negative impact of the net metering changes may be counterbalanced by the recent expansion of the County’s Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing programs (see footnote 13) to help property owners finance new photovoltaic systems.

13. The PACE program allows property owners to secure upfront funding for home efficiency projects that are repaid through a special line item on their property taxes instead of traditional consumer credit. First initiated in 2014, the County has approved five financing choices for owners who choose to participate in the PACE program. In the summer and fall of 2015, the County and nine cities authorized several new PACE programs to be launched in early 2016. Based on the success of PACE programs in other parts of the state, we are hopeful that many homeowners will take advantage of the new financing tool.

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County CounselP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Department Overview

The County Counsel’s Office provides responsive legal advice and assistance to the Board of Supervisors, County departments, boards and commissions, special districts and agencies. This assistance includes negotiating and drafting contracts and legal documents, and representing Marin County in civil litigation and administrative hearings. Other assistance includes administration of tort and other claims; legal services involving juvenile welfare proceedings; Public Administrator, Public Guardian, and Lanterman-Petris-Short Conservatorships. The office also defends the County and its officers from liability and enables the Board of Supervisors to carry out its programs and policies within the limits of the law. In addition, the County Counsel’s Office assists the Civil Grand Jury, which consists of 19 residents selected annually by the Judges of the Superior Court. The Civil Grand Jury is charged with examining the conduct, policies and needs of public agencies (including the County) and elected officers within Marin County, as well as the conditions and management of the Marin County Jail and San Quentin State Prison. The Civil Grand Jury is required to submit a final report of its findings to the Superior Court. The County Counsel’s Office provides timely legal advice and litigation support to the Board of Supervisors, County departments, boards and commissions, and special districts and agencies. The County Counsel’s Office handles all incoming claims and attempts to dispose of them at the claims level, before they become lawsuits.

Recent Accomplishments

• Implemented upgraded case and document management programs and purchased new claims management program

• Closed 22 lawsuits: 12 of which resulted in dismissals (take nothing); one was won on demurrer by the County; five were settlements saving the County thousands of dollars in Court proceedings. We prevailed on 2 Personnel Commission hearings.

• Negotiated with CSAC for reimbursem*nt on in custody medical malpractice cases

• 25 child welfare cases taken to trial with a 99% success • Eliminated a 15 year backlog in probate cases• Won a federal lawsuit for the Marin DA that ensured

continued key prosecutions in Consumer Protection cases

Key Challenges and Outstanding Issues

• Larger caseloads resulted in increased extra hire spending

• Training new legal support staff personnel to ensure excellent legal support for attorneys

• Implementing a key staff initiative focusing on communication, competency, collaboration and courtesy

FY 2015-16 Approved Budget

Department FTE 23.00Revenues $525,190Expenditures $5,224,562

Net County Cost $4,699,372

The mission of the County Counsel’s Office is to provide high quality and timely legal services supporting the County of Marin’s mandated and discretionary governmental functions. Advisory and litigation services are furnished to County departments, boards and agencies in a manner that is cost-effective, professional and promotes excellence in delivery of government services contributing to the health, safety and welfare of county residents and visitors.

marincounty.org/cl

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Goal I: Provide exemplary legal services in a cost-effective manner to assist clients in achieving their objectives

Goal II: Provide clients with the legal information they need to facilitate legal compliance, efficiency, and a safe and secure work environment

Goal III: Provide quality legal trainings in areas such as the Brown Act and the Public Records Act to Departments, Boards, Commissions and Special Districts

Goal IV: Reduce the number of frivolous claims and lawsuits

♦ Conduct monthly meetings with HR and CAO, utilizing a case management approach for all employment law cases

♦ By June 2017, provide training on warrant protocol, other warrant issues, subpoena issues and courtroom preparation to the Children and Family Services division of Health and Human Services.

♦ In collaboration with Human Resources, develop and deliver presentations on Personnel Management Regulations and manager responsibilities regarding discrimination and harassment reporting by June 2017

♦ Obtain certification from the FPPC by June 2017 to provide AB 1234 (Ethics Training).

♦ Meet monthly with Community Development Agency regarding new key CEQA statutory laws and the California Coastal Commission Land Use Plan

♦ Develop an Employment and Training Proposal to form a JPA with Napa County under the Workforce Investment Opportunity Act during FY 2016-2017

♦ Under a newly signed agreement with CSAC, provide representation on in custody Medical Malpractice cases under the CSAC excess program

♦ Conduct a customer service survey by June 2017, including questions that assess if County Counsel is assisting Departments to reach their goals in the 5 Year Business Plan

♦ During 2017, develop new sources of revenue through outreach to other special districts for general law advice, employment law services and litigation work

Initiatives

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County CounselP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Performance Measures 2012-13 Actual

2013-14 Actual

2014-15 Actual

2015-16 Target

2016-17 Target

2017-18 Target

Departmental RevenuePercent of cost savings in legal fees using office attorneys compared with outside counsel 46% 24% 39% 60% 50% 50%Overall increase in department revenue N/A N/A 12% 10% 10% 10%Increase in revenue from Special Districts N/A N/A 15% 10% 10% 10%

Customer ServicePercent of clients who rate our services as good or very good on our customer service survey N/A 557 625 550 740 550

Story Behind Performance

Departmental Revenue

County Counsel is hoping to expand its existing source of revenue by promoting available services to special districts. The department has already expanded services to some special district clients through handling their litigation matters. It is hoped that the special districts will see the efficiency of the department’s litigation services and the resultant economic advantages.

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Cultural ServicesP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Department Overview

The Department of Cultural Services offers active, engaging and diverse cultural and visitor programs and services to support a healthy community in Marin County. The Marin Center, the centerpiece of the department, is a popular, vital, multipurpose civic, cultural and community resource, providing a variety of educational, recreational, artistic and community services for people of all ages and backgrounds, with a focus on improving the quality of life and responding to the changing needs of the community.

Recent Accomplishments

• The 2015 Marin County Fair won the Merrill Award, a top honor from the Western Fairs Association, along with 35 achievement awards

• The nonprofit partnership organization, Marin Cultural Association, received 501(c)3 status. The nonprofit was formed to support Art and Culture in Marin County, including the Marin Center and the Marin County Fair.

• Installed facility scheduling software for reporting and contracting for facility rental program

• Established the Exhibit Hall Gallery, a new visual arts space, to showcase Marin County artists throughout the year

• Collaborated with Department of Public Works to choose a vendor to create a Facility Assessment Plan to identify and prioritize maintenance projects at the Marin Center

• Added one dedicated maintenance staff to work on critical maintenance and repairs in the Marin Center

• Produced 16 culturally diverse Marin Center Presents performances

Key Challenges and Outstanding Issues

• Keeping pace with advancements in technology including ticketing software, online marketing and social media to retain existing and gain new customers

• Improving and maintaining facility and auditorium stage equipment to bring them to a standard to be competitive with other regional event centers

• Ensuring convenient and safe access to events at Marin Center during construction for the Civic Center Drive project, SMART railway system and facility renovations

• Aligning department infrastructure and resources to support a new vision for the department

FY 2015-16 Approved Budget

Department FTE 16.50Revenues $2,327,150Expenditures $3,893,282

Net County Cost $1,566,132

The mission of the Department of Cultural Services is to promote and enhance the cultural, educational, social, economic, recreational, and entertainment life of Marin County for all residents.

marincenter .org

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Goal I: Ensure excellent customer service

Goal II: Provide and enhance community enrichment through cultural and learning opportunities

Goal III: Promote leadership and administrative support for staff development

Goal IV: Create and develop community partnerships

♦ Collaborate with Department of Public Works to complete a Facility Assessment in FY 2016-17, including the prioritization of maintenance projects to bring the Marin Center up to a standard that is competitive with other regional performing arts and event facilities

♦ Conduct online surveys following each Marin Center performance to identify target audiences for marketing campaigns, and identify facility upgrade needs as they relate to audience safety, comfort and access

♦ Produce an award-winning 2016 and 2017 Marin County Fair through research and use of innovative themes and activities

♦ Launch a Latino Series as part of the Marin Center Presents programming in FY 2016-17 in collaboration with a newly assembled Advisory Group comprised of leaders in the Latino community to inform the direction, programming and community engagement associated with the series

♦ Collaborate with Department of Health and Human Services in FY 2016-17 to form a steering committee about serving Marin’s senior community

♦ Launch a pilot program in FY 2017-18 to better serve Marin’s senior community through events and programming at the Marin Center

♦ Partner with Youth In Arts to implement a comprehensive arts education program for elementary aged students that would serve all districts in Marin County to guarantee that every child has access to the arts

♦ Fully implement event/facility scheduling software in FY 2016-17 to better serve rental clients and improve communication with Marin Convention and Visitors’ Bureau on available dates for meetings and conferences

♦ Participate in and support planning efforts for Civic Center Drive Improvement Project, public/private partnership with Agricultural Institute of Marin on the “Christmas Tree Lot”, Sonoma-Marin Area Rail Transit (SMART) station and improvements to the Marin Veterans’ Memorial Auditorium parking lot

♦ Create a RFP for new food and beverage concessionaire in FY 2016-17 and research strategies to improve food and beverage services at events at the Marin Center

♦ Play a leadership role in convening Marin County Artists and Art Organizations to raise the profile of the art and culture in the County and begin planning for a dedicated funding source for the arts

♦ Ensure 100 percent of department staff receives annual performance evaluations and ensure all managers, supervisors and employees receive training on performance evaluations

♦ Continue to develop and refine a robust and exemplary Marin Center Volunteer Program and enhance the program with better data and tracking with the goal of 100 percent of volunteer sign ups to be done through the new County of Marin Samaritan Volunteer Software

♦ Develop an operational model and fundraising strategies in FY 2016-17 for newly established non-profit, Marin Cultural Association, to support the Marin Center and determine fundraising goals in FY 2017-18

♦ Enhance and expand the Frank Lloyd Wright Civic Center public docent tours to respond to UNESCO nomination and increased national and international exposure for Frank Lloyd Wright and the Marin County Civic Center

♦ Collaborate with Information Services and Technology (IST) and the Marin County Free Library to create a download-able mobile app showcasing the history and story of the Marin County Civic Center

Initiatives

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Cultural ServicesP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Performance Measures 2012-13 Actual

2013-14 Actual

2014-15 Actual

2015-16 Target

2016-17 Target

2017-18 Target

Marketing and Ticket SalesTotal number of Marin Center ENews subscribers 34,073 38,358 43,948 40,000 50,000 52,000Total number of Marin Center Magazine 87,179 86,283 88,173 89,000 89,000 90,000Total number of Facebook fans1 5,022 5,891 7,019 8,000 10,000 12,000Percentage of total ticket sales on line 27% 51% 43% 45% 50% 52%Total number of tickets sold2 N/A 111,000 99,000 99,000 99,000 99,000Total ticket sales3 $4,074,000 $4,526,000 $3,504,000 $3,500,000 $3,500,000 $3,500,000Total box office revenues (from convenience fees) $312,440 $256,392 $258,029 $310,000 $320,000 $320,000Total revenue from Facility Fee (implemented January 2016)4 N/A N/A N/A $123,500 $247,000 $247,000

Volunteer ProgramNumber of volunteers 924 842 871 871 871 871Number of volunteer hours 13,389 14,487 16,348 16,348 16,348 16,348Average number of volunteer hours per volunteer 14.5 17.2 18.8 18.8 18.8 18.8Dollar value of volunteer participation $334,725 $362,175 $408,700 $408,700 $408,700 $408,700

Facility RentalsPercent of weekend days that the Marin Veterans’ Memorial Auditorium is rented out N/A N/A 52% 50% 50% 50%Percent of weekend days that the Exhibit Hall is rented out N/A N/A 49% 50% 50% 50%Percent of weekend days that the Showcase Theatre is rented out N/A N/A 58% 55% 55% 55%Percent of weekend days that the fairground is rented out N/A N/A 40% 40% 40% 40%Number of days that the Lagoon Park is rented out N/A N/A 10% 10% 10% 10%

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Story Behind Performance

Marketing and Ticket Sales

1. The department plans on continuing to grow its marketing and outreach. Social Media will be a focus in FY 2016-18, and the initiative to increase Facebook followership by at least 25 percent is reflected in the increase in the Targeted number of fans, from 7,000 at the end of FY 2014-15 to 12,000 in FY 2017-18.

2. This is a new measure for FY 2016-18. Data for the total number of tickets sold is only available beginning FY 2013-14, when the ticketing and purchase tracking software which tracks this data was installed. This measure is a more meaningful reflection of the department’s increased marketing efforts in recent years than the dollar ticket sales measure.

3. Total dollar ticket sales decreased from FY 2013-14 to FY 2014-15 due to three major factors: an outside producer went from producing five sellout shows in FY 2013-14 to one in FY 2014-15; the Marin Symphony reduced their performance season by two performances; and the Marin Center Presents series experienced a reduction in ticket sales.

4. The $3 per ticket facility fee was implemented in fall 2015 to help subsidize greatly needed maintenance and repairs in the aging Marin Center and Showcase Theater facilities. The revenue generated by the facility fee will directly fund one full time maintenance employee, as well as cover the additional maintenance costs associated with repairing and replacing aging infrastructure in the Marin Center rental spaces.

Volunteer Program The department aims to maintain its robust volunteer program in FY 2016-18. Target numbers for the program in FY 2015-16 are not expected to increase since the program is currently at full capacity given the department’s current available staffing and resources.

Facility Rentals Beginning in FY 2014-15, these metrics have been changed from number of days to percentage usage on weekend days (Friday, Saturday and Sunday) which is more meaningful in tracking usage of the facilities. In FY 2016-17, facility rentals will be lower due to the required closing of facilities for the installation of a new alarm system in the Exhibit Hall and Showcase Theater. The construction on Civic Center Drive will also likely have an effect on facility rentals. In addition, school schedules and holidays always influence desirable event dates.

The department’s effort to bring the department’s facilities up to a standard to be competitive with other regional event centers is fully underway. However, since it will take several years to build up sufficient reserves and undertake construction and restoration projections, facility rentals are expected to remain flat through FY 2017-18.

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District AttorneyP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Department Overview

On behalf of the People of the State of California, the Office of the District Attorney is by state law the public prosecutor responsible for determining who will face prosecution for public offenses. The District Attorney is not only mandated to determine who will face criminal charges but is further mandated to then conduct the prosecutions and to attend all court proceedings required to meet these obligations and responsibilities, as well as oversee and supervise the necessary investigative requirements connected to these prosecutions. In addition, the District Attorney is one of two legal advisors to the County Civil Grand Jury and, when impaneled, is the sole legal advisor to the County Criminal Grand Jury.

The California Constitution mandates that each County have an elected District Attorney. The District Attorney is both a Public Officer of the County and a Public Officer of the State when engaged in the prosecution of crimes as defined under State law.

The District Attorney’s Office has been organized into three operational divisions that address our overall county and state mandated responsibilities. The three divisions are the General Prosecution Division, Targeted Prosecution Division and the Special Operations Division. Under the General Prosecution Division, there are four operational attorney teams that directly staff and vertically prosecute the cases assigned to the four felony judicial departments. In addition, the fifth operational attorney team carries the caseload of the misdemeanor prosecutions that are distributed among the previously referenced felony departments, as well as cover misdemeanor case responsibilities in a fifth judicial department.

Within the Targeted Prosecution Division, there are six operational units. These operational units are specifically tasked to focus on targeted, high priority case responsibilities. The units are Intake Processing, Law and Motion, Special Victims’ Unit, Juvenile Court Operations,

Insurance Fraud and the Marin County Major Crimes Task Force operations.

The Special Operations Division is an amalgam of the civil law responsibilities of the District Attorney. This division will blend into these responsibilities the criminal charging obligations that touch upon its varied caseload. Within this division there are five units. These include the Consumer Fraud Unit which has folded under its umbrella a very active County Mediation Team that attempts to resolve civil community disputes through a mediation approach. The other operational units cover Environmental Law, Real Estate, Elder Financial Abuse Fraud and Brown Act violations.

As an adjunct and in support of the District Attorney, there is an Administrative Support Unit, as well as an Information and Systems Technology Team. Under the California Constitution’s Marsy’s Law Article, the District Attorney has mandated duties and responsibilities with respect to victims of crime. Servicing these responsibilities is a Victim-Witness Unit which liaisons with the victims or the surviving family members of victims of crime and provides an informational and at times an advocacy link with the District Attorney.

The Office of the District Attorney also has mandated investigative responsibilities, and to meet this duty, a team of peace officers headed by a Chief Inspector reports to the District Attorney. This team is tasked with not only providing existing caseload police investigative support but also at times is tasked with initiating criminal investigations.

FY 2015-16 Approved Budget

Department FTE 81.00Revenues $8,645,569Expenditures $17,764,129

Net County Cost $9,118,580

The mission of the District Attorney’s Office is to enhance the quality of life in Marin County by taking a proactive role in preventing crime, prosecuting with integrity, equality and excellence, and protecting the community by effectively dealing with those who prey upon our residents.

marincounty.org/da

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District AttorneyP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

Recent Accomplishments

• Recognizing that Marin County has a documented alcohol and substance abuse history, this office has partnered with nongovernmental groups and organizations as well as our schools to educate our residents on this issue with a goal of preventing and stemming this historical trend. Specifically addressing the repeated impaired driver, we competed and were successful in obtaining a state grant that enables us to put in place a team of attorneys and an investigator to target the repeat offender as well as address the increasing caseload of combined drug and alcohol impaired drivers.

• During the past year, the District Attorney has joined with District Attorneys around the state as well as with our law enforcement partners in addressing and combating human trafficking. With our community partners, we are developing public awareness of just what constitutes human trafficking and when encountered or observed how to report it. In Co-Chairing the Marin County Coalition to End Human Trafficking, we are in the process of developing a resource guide to assist survivors (victims) of human trafficking.

• Gun violence is a national issue and is present in Marin. The right of an individual to possess and own firearms and ammunition is constitutionally guaranteed. However, this guarantee does have limitations and can be and is regulated. To assure that residents of Marin are protected and that those residents who do have legally imposed limitations on their right to own or possess firearms, we have put in place an Armed Prohibitive Persons (APPs) monitoring program. This program, using existing state and federal databases, undertakes compliance checks on our residents carrying the restrictions to assure compliance. In prioritizing the compliance checks, the individuals carrying restrictions coming from mental health and domestic violence generated prohibitions are the first checked.

Key Challenges and Outstanding Issues

• No greater challenge or responsibility exists than to assure our residents that the District Attorney’s role is not simply to get a conviction in an individual case but to assure that justice is done and that due process was afforded the accused. This is done by always being mindful of our ethical responsibilities, being accessible to the public to explain our actions and being as transparent as possible on how we conduct ourselves in meeting our mandated and discretionary responsibilities. One step being taken in the upcoming year is to have our Inspectors (police officers) carry body cameras. As a District Attorney’s Office, we do not have the daily patrolled-based contacts that our local law enforcement partners experience; however, we do have many public contacts that can and will be documented. Marin County is the first District Attorney’s office in California putting in place a policy requiring and equipping with body cameras its investigative staff.

• Today approximately 20 per cent of Marin’s population is 65 years of age or older. In the Bay Area, Marin County has the largest percentage of seniors among its population base and has shown the largest growth in its senior demographic. This trend is expected to continue and, in fact, accelerate in the upcoming decade. Coupled with this population demographic is the fact that nationally Marin County ranks in the 25 highest medium income counties, and, specifically in California, Marin residents have the state’s highest per capita income. This makes Marin’s seniors a prime target for financial exploitation. In order to protect our maturing population base, we need to prepare and be properly staffed to address our financial exploitation vulnerability. Putting in place a dedicated real estate and financial elder abuse investigative and prosecution team is an upcoming key challenge. Over the next year, the District Attorney will be working with other county partners to develop a funding source to meet this need.

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District AttorneyP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

Goal I: Increase traffic safety through the enhanced Driving Under the Influence (DUI) prosecution program

Goal II: Increase the safety of victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, human trafficking and gang violence

Goal III: Create and develop community partnerships to support the fight against human trafficking

Goal IV: Maintain Adult Drug Court (ADC)

Goal V: Support employee development

♦ In FY 2016-17 host three round table discussions with multiple Marin law enforcement agencies, the Department of Justice and the Department of Motor Vehicles to improve best practices in DUI investigations

♦ Bring in guest speakers to provide legal education updates to Deputy District Attorneys regarding DUI

♦ Participate in outreach efforts in Marin high schools on the issue of DUI by reaching 100 high school students per fiscal year, either through the Real DUI trials in schools program (in conjunction with the courts), or through separate outreach programs and presentations in local high schools

♦ Conduct law enforcement training programs for 40 local law enforcement officers per fiscal year in order to improve the quality of in-court presentation of evidence

♦ Reduce the amount of time by two or more days between arrest and prosecution of cases

♦ Educate law enforcement on and use trauma centered interview techniques with victims which include a risk assessment evaluation

♦ Increase thorough investigations, arrests, and prosecutions for misdemeanor offenses including restraining order violations to promote early intervention into and prevention of violence and intimidation by offenders

♦ Work with Community Violence Solutions to develop a poster campaign on what constitutes human trafficking and how to report it

♦ Assist law enforcement in developing and implementing a training program on the county’s human trafficking protocol

♦ In collaboration with the Marin County Coalition to End Human Trafficking, develop a county resource guide to assist survivors/victims of human trafficking

♦ Review and update existing ADC policy and procedures

♦ Provide DAs with in-house training on the benefits of ADC for drug addicted defendants

♦ Conduct meeting with Public Defender, Probation and the Court to better our team approach to ADC clients

♦ Support employee development through training courses, webinars, subscriptions, conferences and presentations from subject matter experts. Many training conferences and seminars that employees attend include: Child Abuse, Felony Sentencing, Vehicular Homicide and Asset Forfeiture trainings. The Traffic Safety Resource Prosecutor Program (TSOP) provides webinars and training on Advanced DUI Prosecution and talks by subject matter experts within their organization. Subscriptions to California Criminal Investigations (CCI) and the Prosecutors Brief provide valuable materials and guidance to the prosecutorial process.

♦ Employees are cross-trained and rotated through a variety of assignments to achieve a thorough knowledge of the workflow and processes throughout the DA Office

♦ Employees attend County sponsored trainings to stay informed on organizational, supervisorial and legal requirements related to employment practices and role development

Initiatives

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ElectionsP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Department Overview

The Elections Department, with its staff of ten full-time employees, provides election services year-round to Marin County’s approximately 150,000 registered voters. Each year, the department plans for and manages regularly-scheduled elections and special elections called by the cities, towns, schools, and special districts in Marin County. Throughout the year, department staff works to keep the voter files up to date, check signatures on petitions, maintain the website to keep information current, check and service election equipment, and keep track of candidate and campaign financial reports. The department is also responsible for receiving and tracking conflict-of-interest statements from approximately 1,000 elected officials and designated employees in the County, schools, and special districts. The department’s goal is to ensure community trust by being accessible, responsive, and transparent in all aspects of elections. We do this in part through the Election Advisory Committee, the website, and community outreach efforts. The Elections Department provides the following election services: • Registers voters, conducts voter outreach, and

maintains the voter rolls• Conducts federal, state, county, city, school, and district

elections, which includes managing the candidate filing process, establishing polling places and precincts, recruiting and training poll workers, compiling and distributing Voter Information Pamphlets, mailing and receiving vote-by-mail ballots, and processing and counting ballots

• Checks signatures on state and local initiative, nominating, and recall petitions

• Maintains campaign finance information on office holders, candidates, and measures as required by the Fair Political Practices Commission

Recent Accomplishments

• Implemented the payment of postage for all returned vote-by-mail ballots to promote turnout, an initiative supported by the Election Advisory Committee and the Board of Supervisors

• Successfully conducted the November 3, 2015, Uniform District Election and two special elections

• Partnered with Information Service Technology (IST) to redesign the public self-service options and create a user-friendly, one-stop dashboard feature, which is also accessible on mobile devices

• Worked with IST to automate the candidate application form and application for vote by mail so these forms can be submitted online

• Implemented VoteCal, a centralized voter registration database

• Developed a list of desired and required features for a new voting system

Key Challenges and Outstanding Issues

• Transitioning to new voting machines• Expanding voter outreach to communities with

disproportionately low numbers of registered voters • Implementing AB 1436 (2012) pertaining to conditional

voter registration• Managing high voter registration and turnout for the

November 2016 presidential election

FY 2015-16 Approved Budget

Department FTE 10.00Revenues $698,000Expenditures $3,385,187

Net County Cost $2,687,187

The mission of the Elections Department is to provide a responsive, transparent, and professional approach to conducting elections that will inspire trust and confidence in our work and to promote the participation of all eligible citizens in the election process.

marincounty.org/elec t ions

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Goal I: Ensure community trust by being accessible, responsive, and transparent in all aspects of elections

♦ Begin the transition to a new electronic voting system by developing a request for proposals for the new voting machines and equipment by June 2018

♦ Complying with Elections Code, redesign the address verification card by June 2017 to eliminate confusion, and perform annual maintenance on the voter registration database in order to maintain up-to-date records for accurate reporting

♦ Provide outreach through published notices and newsletters to increase the number of new recruits and retain experienced poll workers

♦ Reduce the number of printed sample ballots by promoting the opt-out option and track the continuous savings per election resulting from the number of voters that choose to opt-out

♦ Efficiently manage increasing number of vote-by-mail ballots by processing a minimum of 75 percent of the vote-by-mail ballots prior to Election Day in order to report significant results after polls close on election night

♦ In FY 2016-17, target underrepresented areas for outreach by reviewing current data, such as from the American Community Survey, for communities/precincts in order to compare the population of people eligible to register with the actual number of registered voters and work with community organizations to empower eligible voters

♦ Continue to create a user-friendly website by converting PDF forms into electronically-completed/submitted forms and ensure all remaining unconverted forms are converted by June 2018

♦ Increase level of transparency about election administration processes by including new flow charts, timelines, and infographics to visually represent aspects of election activities including preparations leading to Election Day, Election Day activities, and post-election canvass in an easy-to-understand format

♦ Continue to support employee development and engagement by ensuring that at least 50 percent of Elections Department staff engage in employee development opportunities

♦ Continue to hold regular staff meetings that allow for participation in decisions that impact the department, including Managing for Results and departmental policies and hold debriefing sessions after each election in order to determine where to make improvements

Initiatives

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Performance Measures 2012-13 Actual

2013-14 Actual

2014-15 Actual

2015-16 Target

2016-17 Target

2017-18 Target

Voter Registration and TurnoutTotal number of registered voters in November election 155,025 151,407 148,976 149,000 156,000 150,000Percentage of eligible voters registered for statewide election held in fiscal year 88% 84% 84% 86% 87% 85%Turnout in November elections 90% 38% 60% 40% 90% 40%

Voting TrendsPercentage of registered voters requesting vote-by-mail ballots in the November election1 70% 69% 71% 75% 75% 75%Number of voters opting out of receiving a printed sample ballot booklet2 N/A N/A N/A N/A 15,000 18,000

Poll WorkersNumber of poll workers recruited for statewide election 742 557 625 550 740 550

Story Behind Performance

Voter Registration and Turnout

These are projected numbers based on past participation by voters. Numbers fluctuate depending on the type of election. For example, a presidential election (FY 2012-13) will typically have more registered voters and higher turnout than a local election (FY 2015-16).

Voting Trends 1. This statistic is the current percent of voters that have registered to vote by mail in the November Elections. The Target number is based on the current trend.

2. FY 2016-17 is the first year of the new opt-out program. We will have updated targets at the end of FY 2016-17.

Poll Workers These are projected numbers based on past need for this type of election. For example, a presidential election (FY 2012-13) will typically have more polling places than a local election (FY 2015-16).

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UC Cooperative Extension Farm AdvisorP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Department Overview

The University of California Cooperative Extension (UCCE) provides countywide services through an agreement between the County and University of California (UC) that has existed since 1921. Through this unique partnership between Marin, UC, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), and other private funds, the department’s advisors and educational programs use practically applied research information to solve community problems. Advisors and program team members consult with individuals and organizations, publish newsletters, produce information for mass media, and conduct seminars and workshops. The university provides research and education through four university professionals who are funded by the state. Additionally, three Sonoma-based UCCE advisors work cross-county between Marin and Sonoma counties. The County provides support staff and operational costs. The UCCE Farm Advisor provides the following service areas:• Sustainable agriculture and food systems• Integrated landscape management • Water quality and watershed management • 4-H youth development

Recent Accomplishments

• Conserved up to 8,000 gallons of water per home per year for 1,200 individual home gardens

• Delivered Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM) programs to 1,300 youth in underserved communities

• Supported farming families to develop both estate and farm business succession plans

• Reconvened the Marin Food Policy Council

• Developed final report and policy recommendations for equitable access to local healthy food countywide

• Completed research on the beneficial impacts of stream restoration on climate change

• Led development of organic and conventional management measures for invasive weeds

• Supported expansion of community gardens from 90 to 120 over the last six years

Key Challenges and Outstanding Issues

• Building resiliency to climate change for both high and low rainfall years

• Strength of the local economy and governmental policies to support the success of agriculture’s next generation

• Continued impacts of invasive weeds and forest pathogens on grassland communities, forest health, and working landscape ecosystem services

• Delivery of programs to the full diversity of Marin’s residents and communities

• Using technology to expand program reach and effective delivery

FY 2015-16 Approved Budget

Department FTE 2.00Revenues $3,500Expenditures $278,052

Net County Cost $274,552

The mission of the University of California Cooperative Extension Farm Advisor is to sustain a vital agriculture, environment, and community in Marin County by providing University of California research-based information in agriculture, natural resource management, nutrition, and youth development.

marincounty.org/farm

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Goal I: Strengthen the viability and long-term success of agriculture in Marin County by educating producers and next generation farmers

Goal II: Preserve the environment through integrated landscape management

Goal III: Improve water quality and watershed conditions in Marin’s watersheds with science-based research and information

Goal IV: Provide direction on countywide funding for habitat restoration

Goal V: Increase access to local healthy food for communities countywide

Goal VI: Develop leadership, community service, and life skills among Marin County youth using experiential, inquiry-based learning in science literacy and environmental education

♦ Increase program delivery to low income and underserved populations by 25 percent in FY 2016-18

♦ Purposefully engage Marin residents to create a broader understanding of the department

♦ Participate in at least two large public venues annually, such as the Point Reyes Station Geography of Hope and the Marin KidCareFair.

♦ Expand social media presence for the department by reaching 500 Facebook likes and post six YouTube learning videos by June 2018

♦ Encourage and reward an internal culture of learning that fosters innovation in program delivery and supports team member growth and development by ensuring that more than 75 percent of staff participate in selected training and skill building opportunities followed by direct use and application to a minimum of two program activities per year

Initiatives

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Performance Measures 2012-13 Actual

2013-14 Actual

2014-15 Actual

2015-16 Target

2016-17 Target

2017-18 Target

Sustainable AgricultureNumber of information workshops conducted 8 7 7 7 5 7Number of attendees at workshops 317 294 375 300 300 350Percent of workshop attendees indicating they are planning to develop on-farm diversification projects 84% 82% 87% 80% 80 80Number of operators initiating or completing diversification projects 6 5 9 5 5 8

Farm DiversificationNumber of acres converted per staff hours 13.8 10.7 4.3 3.1 3.1 2.1Net increase in acres of pasture conversion 11,447 7,270 2,200 2,000 2,000 1,500

Community GardensNumber of community gardens receiving program information 27 31 78 25 50 60Number of community and school gardens using program information to implement and improve community garden opportunities for residents 27 31 50 25 30 40Number of community garden gardeners using information provided through outreach and education 700 975 1,800 1,500 1,500 1,500

Home Garden Water ConservationNumber of participating residents and homeowners in education outreach per year 300 300 300 300 350 375Number of resident surveys completed per year 150 150 150 150 150 150Number of residents who change conservation practices per year 120 125 150 125 125 125Annual amount of water usage reduced after education (millions of gallons) 6.0 7.2 8.4 9.6 10.8 12.0

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Performance Measures 2012-13 Actual

2013-14 Actual

2014-15 Actual

2015-16 Target

2016-17 Target

2017-18 Target

Food AccessNumber of new local agricultural points of sales (farm stands, CSAs, farmers market) accepting CalFresh N/A N/A N/A N/A 2 3

Watershed StewardshipNumber of participating ranch or dairy landowners 137 75 125 75 75 75Number of water and soil samples collected 275 100 250 200 200 200Number of conservation management practices implemented on-farm 23 20 20 20 20 20

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Story Behind Performance

Sustainable Agriculture

With our partners, we continue to make progress on the issues and complete the tasks identified in the 2012 Marin Agricultural Support Action Plan. Succession planning, weed and pasture management, and support for water quality regulation compliance are priorities for the coming two years. Efforts will build upon successful programs underway or completed including weed management research, education on business communication and conflict resolution skills, and short courses for water quality management on dairies.

In October 2015, we co-hosted “Honoring Agricultural Diversification in Marin.” This one day conference highlighted the small and medium scale enterprises that have evolved over the last 20 years, on Marin’s farms and ranches, and the economic benefit they have provided to Marin’s farm families and the local economy.

This coming summer, we will recruit and hire a new UCCE Dairy Advisor for Marin and Sonoma Counties. The focus of this new career position is on pasture management and the multi-species and organic farming of the North Bay, bringing technical knowledge to further realize the competitive advantage area dairy farmers have in producing farmstead and artisan dairy products.

Farm Diversification The hand-off to the next generation of farmers and ranchers is underway. With that comes the development of new enterprises. We are actively supporting these beginning farmers and ranchers with tools and resources to develop business plans and work effectively and efficiently with Marin staff, and other resource agencies for project approval. The information from “Honoring Agricultural Diversification in Marin” will also be useful in pending discussions and policy decisions on diversification within the Local Coastal Plan and the Point Reyes National Seashore Environmental Assessment and Ranch Plan.

Organic conversion of farmland and pasture continues. A marked increase in the rate of conversion occurred from 2012 through 2104. This was in direct response to the National Organic Programs Pasture Rule passed in 2009. This rule required that all organic livestock operations meet a threshold for their forage base from pasture. When this was passed dairy producers and grazing livestock operators began the conversion and certification process. That process takes three years and as a result the large influx and increased rate of pasture certification that occurred three years after the Pasture rule was put in to place.

Community Gardens

Community gardens have been growing in Marin, increasing in number from less than 80 in 2009 to over 120 currently. We published an online map of these gardens along with potential sites for new gardens, confirming the growth and opportunity Marin has experienced. Going forward, we will focus on networking these urban food producers to share resources and solve issues of governance and management as well as identifying opportunities to grow new gardens.

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Story Behind Performance

Home Garden Water Conservation

Individual home gardeners that participate in the program save approximately 8,200 gallons of water per year. Multiplied by the 1,300 participants to date that equals and annual savings of 10M gallons of water per year. These results were presented at an American Water Resources Association specialty conference on water conservation and education in August 2015. The program partnership is preparing for delivery of the program in the 2016 and 2017 gardening seasons.

Food Access New developing state policies and programs are creating paths for local farmers to accept CalFresh. This will require local on-the-ground technical assistance to connect farmers with electronic benefits transfer certification and technology, allowing them to sell to customers using CalFresh at their respective farms, farmers markets, and other agricultural points of sale located within communities and close proximity to CalFresh recipients.

Watershed Stewardship

Working with Point Reyes National Seashore staff and Tomales Bay Watershed Council representatives, we are conducting trend analysis of stream water quality data in west Marin watersheds. This includes microbial results dating back to the 1970s coupled with data from current water sampling and analysis. This “trend” analysis is being conducted to evaluate any changes in water quality over time and in the context of conservation practice implementation over the same time period.

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Department of FinanceP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Department Overview

The Department of Finance (DOF) provides the following services on behalf of the citizenry, to the school districts, special districts, towns and cities: accounting, treasury, property tax administration (e.g., collection, billing, apportionment), collection services, financial reporting, accounts payable, audits, estate administration and other financial services. The divisions of the Department of Finance are: • Accounting /Payroll • Administration • Finance • Property Taxes/Collection

Recent Accomplishments

• Received the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting for its Comprehensive Financial Report (CAFR)

• Maintained an ‘AAA’ rating for the Marin County Treasurer’s Investment Pool, the highest possible rating offered by rating agencies

• Updated payment processing policies to better align department to best business practices, such as moving all County employee expense reimbursem*nts to a direct deposit payment method, and adopting available payment terms that increase County cash flow

• Completed system upgrade of business license software, a critical step in implementing web-based license renewals and on-line payment processing

• Successfully completed check deposit pilot program. All school districts now have remote deposit functionality.

• Implemented the DOF Employee of the Quarter Award program to acknowledge employee excellence. The program and selection process is modeled after the Countywide Employee of the Month program.

• Filled several key open positions in Payroll and Tax divisions

Key Challenges and Outstanding Issues

• The Administrative Technologies of Marin (ATOM) project will continue to provide both challenges and opportunities for the next year. The DOF will be challenged to maintain daily operations while using its key subject matter experts in redesigning business policies, processes and procedures, and implementing the Finance and Payroll/HR modules of the new financial system.

• The County is on track to go live in July 2016 with the Finance module of the new financial system. The DOF, in partnership with the ATOM implementation team, will need to ensure a smooth transition of this Countywide go-live effort, coupled with the existing intricacies of closing out the FY 2015-16 as well as implementing the Payroll/HR module, which is scheduled to go-live in July 2017.

• Retirements of key staff members continue to be a challenge in terms of workload to recruit for and train new talent. The DOF has also experienced several unplanned long-term absences of senior staff.

FY 2015-16 Approved Budget

Department FTE 63.78Revenues $3,506,129Expenditures $8,590,487

Net County Cost $5,084,358

The mission of the Department of Finance is to instill the public’s trust and ensure the financial integrity of the County of Marin by safeguarding the County’s funds and promoting the prudent utilization of resources.

marincounty.org/dof

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Goal I: Safeguard the County’s assets and ensure timely, accurate, audit-able and secure processing for the receipt and disbursem*nt of County fiduciary funds

Goal II: Ensure the accurate calculation, billing, collection, and distribution of all property tax revenues and other outstanding debt

Goal III: Provide enhanced public service through increased transparency

Goal IV: Provide leadership that cultivates a high performing organization with well-trained staff and the application of best practices

♦ Demonstrate the County’s commitment to the primary objectives of safety, liquidity and investment return within the guidelines of prudent risk management by maintaining the County Investment Pool rating of ‘AAA/V1’ from Fitch Rating Services

♦ Promote increased cash availability and security of funds by completing a pilot program for offsite County depositors to process checks electronically by June 2017

♦ Identify and implement process improvements that integrate and streamline tax collection and apportionment activities by June 2018

♦ Increase Countywide revenue through centralized collection services by improving resolution of client accounts by 5 percent

♦ Increase the caseload for Public Administrator staff by 10 percent while maintaining high quality customer service to the public

♦ Provide excellent customer service to taxpayers through timely response to public inquiry. Aim to decrease phone inquiry wait times by 30 percent by June 2018.

♦ Increase public engagement by soliciting feedback on Department of Finance-provided customer services via online and/or in-office survey cards in FY 2016-17. Analyze customer feedback and implement possible services changes the following fiscal year.

♦ Make significant updates to content and functionality on the department’s public website to increase the community’s awareness of the services provided by the Department of Finance

♦ Increase employee engagement by soliciting staff’s feedback in department-wide meetings on the development of the Department of Finance’s two-year work plans and key metrics

♦ Invest in career growth and development to enhance the skills and competencies of department staff. Aim to have a least 80 percent of staff attend professional development trainings, workshops or other opportunities by June 2018

♦ By June 2017, ensure that all managers/supervisors and employees have received a meaningful yearly performance evaluation with corresponding annual performance goals

♦ Create partnerships and establish a local presence in on-campus recruiting with at least two neighboring higher education institutions to attract entry-level accounting talent

Initiatives

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Performance Measures 2012-13 Actual

2013-14 Actual

2014-15 Actual

2015-16 Target

2016-17 Target

2017-18 Target

Bond RatingMarin County Investment Pool ratings from Fitch Ratings AAA//V1 AAA/V1 AAA/V1 AAA/V1 AAA/V1 AAA/V1

Direct Deposit / Automated Clearing House (ACH) AdoptionPercent of checks deposited electronically1 92% 97% 97% 95% 97% 98%Percent of payroll payments made using direct deposit2 90% 91% 92% 94% 95% 96%Percent of vendor payments made using ACH3 17% 19% 29% 20% 30% 40%

Property Tax BillsTotal tax dollars apportioned ($Millions) $810.2 $854.4 $883.2 $858.0 $935.0 $991.0Number of tax bills revised 13,672 17,939 8,402 4,500 7,000 7,000Number of tax refunds issues 8,635 4,606 4,157 7,000 4,500 4,500Number of days to issue a tax refund 35 30 <30 30 <30 <30

Centralized Collection ServicesPercent of accounts resolved (paid, canceled/closed) 86% 86% 76% 80% 80% 80%Dollars collected on all accounts ($Millions) $10.8 $11.4 $11.3 $10.6 $11.0 $11.0Average number of days accounts are delinquent from date of assignment N/A 208 198 180 180 180Percent of departments rating satisfaction with central collections as good or better N/A 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%Average dollar amount collected per department $470,886 $495,317 $493,139 $460,869 $478,260 $478,260Dollars collected per FTE $2,707,599 $2,848,073 $2,835,551 $2,650,000 $2,750,000 $2,750,000

Customer ServiceNumber of calls received by tax collector’s office4 45,034 29,729 25,212 24,000 24,000 24,000Percent of tax collector staff cross-trained to support public inquiries4 90% 90% 100% 100% 100% 100%Average wait time in minutes to have a call answered4 N/A 1.32 1.38 1 1 1Percent of change in the number of calls received4 N/A 24% -26% -5% -5% <1%

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Performance Measures 2012-13 Actual

2013-14 Actual

2014-15 Actual

2015-16 Target

2016-17 Target

2017-18 Target

Number of updates made to the Department’s public-facing webpage5 N/A N/A N/A N/A 3 5Percent of public feedback report being satisfied or highly satisfied with DOF-provided services6 N/A N/A N/A N/A 70% 75%

Public Administrator ServicesNumber of open Public Administrator cases handled 114 105 108 110 120 125Percent of cases closed within 24 months 95% 80% 80% 95% 95% 95%

Employee Development and EngagementPercent of department staff up-to-date on their annual performance evaluations and corresponding performance goals7 N/A N/A N/A N/A 100% 100%Percent of department staff attending professional development trainings8 56% 77% 66% 70% 100% 75%Percent of department staff report being satisfied or highly satisfied with the DOF work plan and metrics contained within the Countywide MFR program9 N/A N/A N/A N/A 75% 80%Number of campus recruitments participated by the DOF10 N/A N/A N/A N/A 2 3

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Story Behind Performance

Bond Rating The County pool has received the highest rating, ‘AAA/V1’ from Fitch, a nationally recognized, independent credit rating agency. The ‘AAA’ rating indicates extremely strong protection against credit losses associated with the County’s pool investments. The ‘V1’ rating indicates that the County pool possesses low sensitivity to changing market conditions due to its low risk profile and conservative investment policies.

Direct Deposit / Automated Clearing House (ACH) Adoption

1. While the number of checks deposited electronically should increase as a result of efforts to move more agencies into the remote deposit program, the total number of checks should decrease over time as more electronic services are utilized (i.e. Internet, phone, ACH, etc.)

2. The Department of Finance anticipates an increase in direct deposit and ACH payments to payroll recipients and vendors due to initiatives associated with the ATOM project.

3. The Department of Finance anticipates offering annual workshops at year-end to improve the accuracy of invoice processing and as part of the new-hire on-boarding process.

Property Tax Bills The total amount distributed under the Teeter method for the secured property tax roll is 100 percent of the charge. As economic conditions improve, tax defaults have started to decline, but there are still a relatively high number of delinquent properties by historical standards, and nearly 200 active Installment Plans.

Centralized Collection Services

Central Collections continues to generate consistent steady revenue. The volume of clients and related revenue is expected to remain at current levels for the foreseeable future. Once the County goes live with its new financial system in July 2016, a greater emphasis is likely to be placed on centralized billing and collection services through the division. This aligns to the Countywide effort of providing enhanced public service through innovation by supporting the implementation of changed business practices.

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Story Behind Performance

Customer Service 4. The Department of Finance’s goal is to provide more web-based services and reduce billing revisions, to the extent possible. This objective aligns to the Countywide effort of providing enhanced public service through innovation by increasing online options for the community to conduct business with the County.

5. Increase the community’s awareness of the services provided by the Department of Finance via updated content and functionality to the Department’s public website

6. Increase public engagement by soliciting feedback on Department of Finance-provided customer services.

Public Administrator Services

Provide Public Administrator services to County residents by executing the affairs of decedents in accordance with Probate Code.

Employee Development and Engagement

7. Ensure that all managers and employees receive a meaningful yearly performance evaluation with corresponding annual performance goals.

8. This measure aligns to the Countywide effort of investing in career growth and development through programs, services and initiatives to enhance the skills and competencies of department staff.

9. Increase employee engagement by soliciting feedback on the development of the Department’s work plan.

10. Create partnerships and establish a local presence in on-campus recruiting with neighboring higher education institutions to attract intern and entry-level talent, and develop and deploy DOF pilot internship program.

Department of FinanceP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Department Overview

The Marin County Fire Department was established to provide fire and emergency medical services to the unincorporated areas of Marin County. The department operates under various sections of the Health and Safety, Public Resources, and Government Codes. The level of service is discretionary and under the direction of the Board of Supervisors.

The department is involved with numerous activities, including fire control and prevention, emergency medical services (EMS), hazardous materials response, urban search and rescue, public education, and general response to a variety of “all risk” emergencies. The department also contracts with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CalFire) to provide fire suppression services throughout the state.

In all aspects of the department’s operations, codes, standards and regulations have been adopted and are followed in accordance with various authorities or regulatory agencies, such as the California State Fire Marshal, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), and Insurance Services Office (ISO).

Recent Accomplishments

• Developed and implemented a Water Rescue Program• Improved Insurance Service Office rating • Nearing completion of the Community Wildfire

Protection Plan • Secured funding for contemporary 911 phone system• Received FEMA grant funding for Self Contained

Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) equipment • Assisted the Sheriff-Coroner with implementation of a

new Computer Aided Dispatch system

Key Challenges and Outstanding Issues

• Working with the County Administrator and the Department of Public Works to replace the Tomales fire station and develop strategies to rehabilitate aging facilities

• Re-assessing dispatch services and identifying options to achieve service level goals

• Identifying funding sources to support recent increases in supply costs for all aspects of department operations

• Addressing fuel loads and fire risks that have been exacerbated by the prolonged drought conditions throughout the Wildland Urban Interface

• Responding to increased service needs of the aging community

• Responding to increased service needs resulting from increased visitors to Marin’s coasts and parks

• Identifying resources to replace and maintain emergency vehicles

FY 2015-16 Approved Budget

Department FTE 86.14Revenues $14,702,313Expenditures $22,661,178

Net County Cost $7,958,865

In partnership with our community, we will be prepared, respond quickly, solve problems, be nice, and get home safely.

marincounty.org/f i re

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Goal I: Ensure operational readiness and effectiveness

Goal II: Reduce the risk of wildfires and enhance fire prevention, community education and community disaster preparedness

Goal III: Ensure strong internal and external communication and business practices

♦ Improve response and reflex time by 12 percent by June 2017

♦ In collaboration with other countywide EMS providers train at least 2,500 people in hands only CPR each year

♦ Bring 90 percent of all citations for residential defensible space inspections into compliance by June 2018

♦ Reduce on-scene time for trauma patients by 3 minutes and reduce on-scene time for medical patients by 1 minute by June 2018

♦ Complete and publish department strategic plan in FY 2016-17

♦ Add one FireWise Community each year, focusing on high risk communities as identified in the Community Wildfire Protection Plan

♦ Support one participant in Marin County’s Leadership Academy each year

♦ All personnel in new or CICCS (California Incident Command Certification System) positions will complete the job specific task book within first year by June 2018

♦ Complete 100 percent of annual employee evaluations

♦ Adjust ambulance fees and billing practices to ensure long term solvency

Initiatives

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Performance Measures 2012-13 Actual

2013-14 Actual

2014-15 Actual

2015-16 Target

2016-17 Target

2017-18 Target

Fire SuppressionPercentage of wildfires contained at ten acres or less N/A N/A N/A N/A 90% 90%

Dispatch Response TimeReflex Time (seconds) N/A N/A 136 120 120 120Percentage of reflex times at 2 minutes N/A N/A N/A N/A 90% 90%

Emergency Medical ServicesNumber of Emergency Incidents1 4,691 4,690 4,409 4,500 4,500 4,500Number of Emergency Medical Incidents1 N/A 2,987 2,794 2,472 2,800 2,800Average total time with patient (on scene) - medical (minutes)2 N/A 21 19 20 19 18Average total time with patient (on scene) - trauma (minutes)2 N/A 12 15 12 12 12

Cardiac Arrest DataPercent of cardiac arrest patients with ventricular fibrillation (VF) discharged from the hospital N/A N/A 52% 50% 50% 50%Percent of survivors from VF discharged from hospital N/A N/A 49% 50% 50% 50%Number of cardiac arrest patients who received bystander CPR N/A N/A 58% 55% 55% 55%Percent of patients who received bystander CPR N/A N/A 40% 40% 40% 40%

Fire/Safety Code EnforcementNumber of defensible space inspections conducted 2,049 1,056 2,191 1,500 1,500 1,500Percentage of hazard warnings/citations brought into compliance N/A N/A N/A N/A 90% 90%

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Story Behind Performance

Fire Suppression This benchmark is established under our contract with CAL-Fire. It should be noted that we have regularly exceeded this goal. Fires greater than 10 acres are exponentially more destructive and costly to fight.

Dispatch Response Time

Reflex Time, also known as “Turnout Time”, is the time from notification by dispatch to the first emergency response unit going en route. Improving reflex times through facility planning, training and technology can improve overall incident outcomes. The current average is 2.16 minutes.

Emergency Medical Services

1. The number of emergency incidents is an overall workload indicator. The severity and complexity of incidents can vary dramatically. Targets are based on recent data trends.

2. Reduced time spent with patients while on scene of incidents can help expedite definitive care in cases such as stroke, heart attack or trauma, ultimately improving patient outcome. The industry standard is 20 and 10 minutes respectively. Rural conditions, multiple patient incidents and other factors can effect on scene times.

Cardiac Arrest Data The cardiac arrest data enables our department to perform internal benchmarking and improve our response to cardiac arrest by strengthening the chain of survival. The department as well as the Local Emergency Medical Authority, measures our response data to cardiac arrest by collecting a small set of performance measures. We are able to implement change in an effective manner based off simple but powerful data. This data includes identifying cardiac arrest rhythms such as ventricular fibrillation (VF), whether bystander CPR was initiated, and outcomes of arrest including return of spontaneous circulation and survival to hospital discharge percentage.

In order to ensure common language and data usage regarding cardiac arrest survival the EMS industry uses Utstein style data. This mechanism for data collection and analysis narrows the number of cardiac arrest patients used in the overall study. Although the quantity of data is not large our success rate secondary to aggressive response/ treatment and bystander CPR is quite good compared to the industry standard. Additionally, the lower volume of cardiac arrest events qualifying under this data collection method can cause large variances in outcome percentages. It should also be noted that our mechanism for collecting this data changed in 2014 therefore we did not include previous data.

Fire/Safety Code Enforcement

One of the most important aspects of protecting homes from wildfire is defensible space. We have had a long history of community engagement related to defensible space inspections. In 2015 and again for 2016 CAL Fire has provided the County with additional funding to hire dedicated inspectors to increase the number and quality of the inspections. We are not confident that we will be able to meet goals in outward years without the additional funding. We will continue to partner with other contract counties to pursue permanent funding for the defensible space inspection program.

Additional Comments

It should be noted that previous goals to replace record management systems (RMS) to accurately capture data have been successful. In FY 2012-13 our Emergency Medical Services RMS was replaced and in FY 2015-16 our Fire RMS was replaced. Both RMS programs have the ability to capture higher quality data countywide as well as functionality with cooperating agencies. Several of our measures selected for the next two fiscal years are the result of our ability to capture higher quality data in the new systems.

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Health and Human ServicesP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Department Overview

Marin consistently ranks as the healthiest county in California, correlating with its high levels of income and educational attainment. Despite this success, many in Marin face obstacles to achieving their full potential. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) strives to enable all residents to lead long and healthy lives.

HHS plans, delivers, coordinates and administers a range of state, federal and local programs that address the county’s health and welfare needs. Many of its services are mandated by state and federal laws that differentiate client populations according to factors such as age, condition, type of service, or gender. The challenge for HHS is to serve Marin County in a manner that best addresses the community, family and individual, while maximizing resources earmarked for specific populations or issues.

HHS offers services throughout the county including:• Health and Wellness Center, Kerner Blvd., San Rafael• West Marin Service Center, 100 6th Street, Point Reyes• 120 N Redwood, San Rafael• 10 N San Pedro Rd., San Rafael• 75 Rowland Way, Novato

The Department is divided into four divisions: • Public Health Services• Mental Health and Substance Use Services• Social Services• Planning and Administration Services

While the department is divided into divisions, many of the programs and initiatives are coordinated and operated from an integrated department-wide approach. For instance, housing, nutrition, and substance use prevention efforts involve initiatives that span across the divisions of Public Health, Mental Health and Social Services.

Service Highlights• Enrolled and maintained 35,330 people on Medi-Cal• Assisted 1,680 job seekers to access employment and

training services• Kept 532 formerly homeless people in permanent

supportive housing• Helped 146 families to return to independent

permanent housing through the Rapid Rehousing program

• Provided mental health and substance abuse prevention services to 10,000 county residents

• Delivered mental health services to nearly 3,000 adults and 600 youth

• Distributed 4,246 influenza vaccines• Monitored 2,340 cases of communicable disease

FY 2015-16 Approved Budget

Department FTE 632.78Revenues $128,930,355Expenditures $175,622,840

Net County Cost $46,692,485

The mission of the Department of Health and Human Services is to promote and protect the health, well-being, self-sufficiency and safety of all people in Marin County.

marinhhs.org

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Recent Accomplishments

Department-wide• Launched the development of the first HHS strategic

plan to prioritize, integrate, and optimize our work. Improving equity and implementing more data-driven approaches have emerged as key themes

• Coordinated with key partners, including managed care and local clinics, to ensure patients enrolled in Medi-Cal see their medical provider within 120 days

• Began the planning process for implementation of a Health Information Exchange system of electronic health records among HHS, community clinics, and other medical providers to facilitate coordinated and improved patient care

Public Health• Substance Use Prevention (RxSafe Marin)

○ Established guidelines for narcotics in Emergency Department and primary care providers

○ Adopted a countywide ordinance to increase locations for safe disposal of unused medications

○ Amended the social host ordinance that includes controlled substances and a community service component

○ Saw decrease in accidental overdose mortality from 27 in 2013 to ten in 2014

• Health Equity Initiative ○ Focused on childhood obesity prevention

by targeting healthy eating and active living interventions at high risk schools

○ Increased access to primary care by partnering with community clinics to offer assistance with enrolling in Medi-Cal and Covered California

• Healthy Eating and Active Living (HEAL) ○ Developed and adopted Healthy Food and

Beverage Policy in Marin City ○ Implemented a park prescriptions program,

a collaboration with Marin County Parks and community clinics, in which clinicians prescribe physical activity for patients at risk for chronic disease

○ Staffed the PlayFair program to promote healthy food and beverage choices at the Marin County Fair

• Communicable Disease Control ○ Coordinated with state and federal agencies and

with healthcare partners in the monitoring and control of emerging diseases including Ebola, Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), and Zika virus

○ Established Ebola response task force with local healthcare partners

• Vaccine preventable disease ○ Led community dialogue about the safety and

efficacy of childhood vaccinations ○ Supported successful childhood vaccination

legislation (SB 277) including letters and testimony to the State legislature

Mental Health• Implemented three new crisis outreach teams resulting

in over 1,000 client contacts made in the community in less than a year

• Improved coordinated care for persons with complex mental health and substance use service needs by integrating the mental health and substance use services access line

• Implemented new substance use services to include gender specific-programs and a program for Spanish speakers

• Applied to start the first county operated Drug Medi-Cal clinic to improve access to substance use services for persons diagnosed with serious mental illness

• Supported county workforce development by providing 41 scholarships to Marin residents for becoming certified Drug and Alcohol Counselors, Domestic Violence Counselors and Mental Health Peer Providers

Social Services• Opened satellite enrollment offices in Novato and

in central San Rafael for Medi-Cal, Cal Fresh, Cal WORKs, General Assistance and the Women, Infants and Children programs to increase equitable access to services

• Conducted a Community Wide Needs Assessment for persons over the age of 60 to help shape the goals and objectives for the Area Agency on Aging plan

• Led the second year of the Aging Action Initiative with oversight by a diverse group of community based organizations, faith based agencies and senior advocates

• Licensed eight new foster families in 2015, a 100 percent increase over 2014

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Key Challenges and Outstanding Issues

Department-wide• Addressing increased countywide disparities in income,

housing security, and morbidity • Strengthening cross-division and cross-department

collaboration with community stakeholders to better meet community needs

• Improving coordination and integration of programming and services for clients

• Recruiting new staff in response to increasing retirement and department priorities

• Improving coordination of programming, services, and shelter for the homeless population

Public Health• Improving access to health foods in low income Marin

communities • Reducing Marin’s higher than state average rates of

adult binge drinking • Reducing rates of accidental drug overdoses• Increasing overall vaccination rates to minimize

childhood disease outbreaks • Providing appropriate care to the estimated 4,000

undocumented residents with no healthcare coverage

Mental Health• Improving capacity to place patients in an appropriate

level of care• Expanding treatment programs to meet growing

demand for services• Integrating provision of mental health and substance

use services

Social Services• Ensuring adequate infrastructure to address the needs

of a growing older adult population as 20 to 25 percent of older adults in Marin struggle to meet basic needs

• Improving enrollment rates in the Cal Fresh food assistance program

• Working to ensure that all children, regardless of level of need, will reside long term in a family-style setting, rather than in a group home

• Reducing call time responses for our Public Assistance call center

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Goal I: Ensure the provision of essential and mandated services and benefit programs

Goal II: Prevent injury, physical and mental illness, and chronic conditions among residents

Goal III: Improve the recovery, health, well-being, self-sufficiency and safety of Marin residents

Goal IV: Strengthen methods, practices and systems to ensure efficient and effective delivery of services and strategic plan development and eventual implementation

Goal V: Increase awareness of, and access to, County and community support services

Department-wide ♦ Develop the HHS Strategic plan, with both an internal

focus to support staff development, cross divisional communication, and foster integration; and an external focus to prioritize interventions and optimize their population-level effectiveness in addressing health and wellness disparities. Implementation planning will begin in November 2016, and the plan will be finalized by June 2017.

♦ Promote a more accountable, supportive, and constructive work environment by conducting annual performance reviews for all HHS employees

♦ Implement Phase I of a Health Information Exchange (HIE) to electronically connect Health and Human Services with our four community clinics by June 2017

Public Health ♦ Implement a community-based childhood obesity

prevention initiative that promotes Healthy Eating and Active Living at five low-income schools with the highest rates of obesity in the County with an objective to increase healthy weight by five percent and increase activity levels by ten percent among students by 2020

♦ Support the ongoing work of RxSafe Marin (a diverse coalition of county departments, agencies, and community members) addressing the problem of prescription drug misuse and abuse in Marin

♦ Determine potential options to increase access to care for undocumented persons living in Marin by June 2018

Mental Health ♦ Expand the number and types of Medi-Cal certified

substance use treatment programs and the number of people receiving services covered under Medi-Cal

♦ Expand evidence-based, intensive treatment programs to serve 75 more persons diagnosed with serious mental illness, providing them with a “whatever it takes” approach to engaging in care

♦ Relocate the county detoxification center without interruption in services for clients by June 2017

♦ Improve access to and delivery of services to Latino communities through community outreach in Spanish, including through the use of embedded community health workers (promotores)

Social Services ♦ Improve Cal Fresh outreach and enrollment, with

specific focus on seniors and other underserved populations

♦ Improve accessibility and availability of benefits for veterans of all ages through enhanced staffing and continued outreach efforts

♦ Continue collaborative community efforts to support the Aging Action Initiative

♦ Ensure appropriate infrastructure to support the expanded Medi-Cal population and assist newly enrolled clients with access to primary and specialty health care

Initiatives

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Performance Measures 2012-13 Actual

2013-14 Actual

2014-15 Actual

2015-16 Target

2016-17 Target

2017-18 Target

Public HealthAnnual percent decrease in the average of narcotic dose prescribed1 N/A N/A N/A N/A 8% 8%Annual percent increase of children at a healthy weight in five target school districts that currently have a lower percent of children at healthy weight 2 N/A N/A N/A N/A 3% 3%Percent of kindergarteners entering school fully vaccinated3 N/A N/A N/A N/A 90% 95%Number of health education sessions at Marin Community Clinic Health Hub events4 N/A N/A N/A N/A 50 50

Mental HealthNumber of clients assessed at Psychiatric Emergency Services (PES) 1,019 1,063 1,252 1.260 1,275 1,300Number of Latinos served at PES5 848 800 749 750 775 800Number of days wait time for planned initial mental health assessment6 N/A N/A N/A N/A 15 10Number of days between hospital discharge and first outpatient visit6 N/A N/A NA N/A 10 7Number of Adult Full Service Partnership slots7 N/A N/A N/A N/A 210 255Number of client contacts by Outreach and Engagement, Transition and Mobile Crisis teams8 N/A N/A N/A 1,000 1,200 1,500

Social ServicesPercentage of Adult Protective Services cases resolved and stabilized for 12 months N/A N/A 82% 95% 95% 96%Percentage of In-Home Supportive Services cases receiving timely reassessments N/A N/A 71% 95% 96% 98%Number of clients served at the Marin Employment Connection N/A N/A 1,680 1,680 1,764 1.764Number of licensed foster care homes N/A N/A N/A 36 42 48Number of new applications for Cal Fresh benefits received 6,815 6,551 6,086 7,000 6,400 6,800Number of persons receiving Cal Fresh benefits 9,408 10,286 10,799 10,650 11,000 11,600

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Performance Measures 2012-13 Actual

2013-14 Actual

2014-15 Actual

2015-16 Target

2016-17 Target

2017-18 Target

Percentage of new applications for Cal Fresh benefits processed within regulatory timeframes 94% 93% 95% 95% 98% 98%Number of new applications for Medi-Cal received 5,391 6,554 12,119 6,500 7,000 7,500Number of persons enrolled in the Medi-Cal program 17,547 22,000 35,330 39,660 41,000 42,000Percentage of new applications for Medi-Cal processed within regulatory timeframes N/A 74% 80% 85% 85% 90%

Department-widePercentage of staff who have had a performance evaluation completed in the past year 97% 95% 96% N/A 100% 100%

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Story Behind Performance

Public Health 1. The annual percent decrease in average narcotic doses is a new performance metric for FY 2016-17. Effective July 1, 2016 all healthcare providers who are licensed to prescribe, dispense, furnish or order controlled substances must register to use the Controlled Substance Utilization Review and Evaluation system (CURES).

2. The annual percent increase of children at a healthy weight is a new performance metric for FY 2016-17. The target school districts are Bolinas, Shoreline, San Rafael, Novato, and Sausalito. The County average of children with a healthy weight is 70 percent while the target schools range between 35 to 45 percent.

3. The percent of kindergarteners entering school fully vaccinated is a new performance metric for FY 2016-17. Effective January 1, 2016 personal belief exemptions (PBE) are no longer accepted at school enrollment.

4. The number of health education session is a new performance metric for FY 2016-17. The Health Hubs were launched in Fall 2015.

Mental Health 5. Mental Health and Substance Use Services data beginning FY 2014-15 for Latino beneficiaries served at Psychiatric Emergency admission is based upon updated data collection and analysis methods.

6. Wait times for first assessment and post hospital follow up visits are new performance measures to meet California Department of Health Care Services and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services requirements.

7. Number of Full Service Partnership slots is a new measure. No prior trend data is available.

8. Transition and Mobile Crisis teams are new programs. No prior trend data is available.

Department-wide We are implementing Talent Quest software in the spring of 2016, which will give us a tool for managing employee performance evaluations.

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Department Overview

The Human Resources Department (HR) supports the County of Marin by advancing the future of the organization though strategic services to County departments.

The department provides for the recruitment and retention of a highly-qualified workforce through talent acquisition processes, competitive compensation, classification, and employee benefits structures and a continuous cultivation of excellence though ongoing performance planning, coaching, and evaluation.

In addition, the department ensures a fair and equitable workplace environment through consultation and resolution services and negotiations with the County’s represented unions. Furthermore, the department provides opportunities for the community and County to partner together through a vibrant and robust volunteer program. The department also provides staff services to a number of commissions and committees.

Recent Accomplishments

• Worked with the County Administrator to develop the 5 Year Business Plan including leading the implementation in the focus areas of 1) diversity and inclusion, and 3) growth and development

• Negotiated eight labor contracts• Completed phase I and launched phase II of the

classification redesign project• Increased recruitments to 246 and volunteers hours to

253,430, both of which are at an all-time high• Embedded HR staff in three departments for improved

service levels• Conducted strategic reorganization due to several

internal staff vacancies

Key Challenges and Outstanding Issues

• Addressing recruitment challenges resulting from a competitive job market and identifying strategies to attract a more diverse applicant pool

• Developing training and development programs in the areas of cultural competency, hiring bias, inclusive decision-making, performance management, and evaluation accountability

• Re-prioritizing department resources in response to the temporary staff shortage and turnover related the implementation of the new Payroll/HR software implementation

• Leading negotiations with three safety department bargaining units

• Allocating resources and delivery of services mandated by the 5 Year Business Plan

FY 2015-16 Approved Budget

Department FTE 36.30Revenues $1,000Expenditures $6,034,312

Net County Cost $6,033,312

The mission of the Human Resources Department is to create a thriving organization with meaningful careers in public service.

marincounty.org/hr

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Goal I: Create an inclusive organization

Goal II: Develop a culture of feedback for all employees

Goal III: Assist departments with hiring high-quality and capable employees

Goal IV: Redesign the classification and compensation system to provide of a wide range of services, ensure flexibility, and compensate County employees competitively

♦ Finalize Personnel Management Regulation (PMR) revisions with all labor organizations by June 2017

♦ Provide performance management training in FY 2016-17 and support departments in conducting annual performance evaluations

♦ Deliver pilot training in cultural competency to 20 percent of County employees by June 2017

♦ Conduct pilot coaching programs with selected departments in FY 2016-17

♦ Create a diversity hiring toolkit in FY 2016-17

♦ Strengthen partnerships with Bay Area educational institutions by establishing relationships and designing career ladders with three to five schools by June 2017

♦ Fully implement the Payroll/HR software module in FY 2017-18, which includes employee self-service and benefits modules

♦ Finalize the Classification System Redesign in FY 2017-18 by completing Phase III and reducing the number of classifications from 704 at the beginning of the redesign project to approximately 550 and updating all impacted class specifications at the end of the redesign project

♦ Deliver anti-bias, inclusive decision-making, and cultural competency training to County workforce by June 2018

Initiatives

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Performance Measures 2012-13 Actual

2013-14 Actual

2014-15 Actual

2015-16 Target

2016-17 Target

2017-18 Target

Hiring StatisticsNumber of new employees hired (external recruitments) 73 92 246 165 200 200Number of current employees promoted 107 40 164 160 120 120Number of job applications received 6,326 7,079 7,566 6,000 7,500 7,500Number of recruitments conducted 187 213 266 190 200 200

Increasing DiversityPercentage of all Assistant Department Head and Department Head recruitments that have at least one person of color in the pool of candidates offered an interview N/A N/A N/A N/A 80% 90%Percentage of all Assistant Department Head and Department Head recruitments that have at least one woman in the pool of candidates offered an interview N/A N/A N/A N/A 80% 90%Percent of employees trained on cultural competency N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 100%

Volunteer ProgramNumber of volunteer hours 225,102 242,824 253,430 240,000 260,000 270,000

Employee Growth and DevelopmentPercentage of employees who received performance evaluations N/A N/A N/A N/A 90% 100%Percentage of employees trained on Performance Management process N/A N/A N/A N/A 90% 100%

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Story Behind Performance

Hiring Statistics The number of new employees continues to rise. The number of promotions has dropped slightly as the demand for staff across County departments has opened the field to greater opportunities for outside applicants to fill open vacancies. The number of applications received and recruitments conducted help to identify trends in the labor market.

Volunteer Program The Civic Center Volunteers program continues to enjoy robust activity and continually expand its contribution to the County. The number of volunteer hours continues to rise.

Employee Growth and Development

This is a new measure that reflects Focus Area 3 of the 5 Year Business Plan. Eligible County of Marin employees will receive annual performance evaluations, and County supervisors and managers will be trained on the performance evaluation process and its expectations.

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Department Overview

The Information Services and Technology (IST) Department is committed to working collaboratively with County departments and the local community in defining and delivering high value application and technology products and services. The department is responsible for processing, maintaining, and ensuring the security of the County’s business applications and data on the appropriate hardware and software platforms.

IST is organized into four divisions: • Systems and Applications• Infrastructure• Shared Services• Security

Recent Accomplishments

• Enhanced departmental efficiencies with new web-based systems for vessel property assessment, land use and planning permitting system, probation defendant case management, and parks incident reporting

• Increased online capabilities through automated forms and enhanced automated workflow

• Expanded ability of County websites to scale to any mobile device and be accessible

• Delivered mobile accessibility for property tax bills, food inspections, voter dashboard, and an award-winning County Fair app

• Completed technology infrastructure improvements including: setting up systems and equipment to support the new Emergency Operations Facility; expanding Wi-Fi coverage in the Civic Center; upgrading network and server equipment; and increasing network bandwidth

• Developed an IST Strategic Plan (2016-2020) to help County departments succeed in serving the public by expanding online services, developing mobile apps, and automating internal processes

• Helped install and configure video cameras on four critical peaks to aid in early fire detection in collaboration with Department of Public Works Communications

Key Challenges and Outstanding Issues

• Acquiring specialized skill sets among staff necessary to achieve the goals in the IST Strategic Plan

• Prioritizing and utilizing resources to their greatest potential given the increased demand for IT solutions in the next five years

• Managing and planning for the loss of institutional and technical knowledge due to attrition, as a large portion of departmental staff is eligible and predicted to retire within the next five years

• Establishing a countywide security culture emphasizing that information security is every employee’s responsibility

FY 2015-16 Approved Budget

Department FTE 104.00Revenues $2,337,042Expenditures $20,290,511

Net County Cost $17,953,469

We help our County departments succeed in serving the public.

marincounty.org/is t

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Information Services and TechnologyP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Goal I: Provide access to information from any device, anywhere, anytime to support efficiency and openness – including a “mobile first” philosophy for all IST work

Goal II: Increase options and reduce barriers to service and information for the public and employees, including more self-service options and more flexible and accessible tools

Goal III: Put our customers first, aligning IST initiatives with the business needs of County departments

Goal IV: Establish a Countywide security culture emphasizing that information security is every County employee’s responsibility

♦ Increase accessibility to County business with six new mobile apps by June 2018, prioritized by the Advisory Committee for Technology (ACT) for their impact and meaningfulness to our residents, business owners, and employees

♦ Facilitate efforts to share data and information with an Open Data Portal that will provide County data to the public by June 2017

♦ Provide easier access to County services with five new self-service online payments and seven new automated forms by June 2018, prioritized for their greatest impact by the ACT

♦ Implement and support a new, comprehensive financial management software solution for the County in FY 2016-17 while preparing for a new human resources and payroll software implementation by July 1, 2017

♦ Redesign the County intranet in FY 2017-18 to increase employee productivity, communication, and engagement

♦ Expand the role of the ACT to review and prioritize new technology projects for mobile applications, online payments, and automated forms

♦ Create a formal change management practice to help departments succeed as they implement the County’s 5 Year Business Plan in FY 2016-17

♦ Complete a comprehensive information security assessment in FY 2016-17

♦ Implement a comprehensive, Countywide security training program that promotes security awareness to all County employees by June 2018

♦ Implement a mobile device management system and policy by June 2018 to secure data on the increasing number of mobile devices used by County employees in their daily work

♦ Increase the pool of qualified applicants for department recruitments through outreach, internships, and improvements to IST website

♦ Implement a program to measure IST customer satisfaction in FY 2016-17

♦ Complete a Section 508 compliance pilot program to address access to electronic documents for individuals with disabilities and recommend an implementation plan by June 2018

Initiatives

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Information Services and TechnologyP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Performance Measures 2012-13 Actual

2013-14 Actual

2014-15 Actual

2015-16 Target

2016-17 Target

2017-18 Target

Mobile AppsNumber of total mobile apps N/A N/A 2 4 7 10

Moving Processes OnlineNumber of visitors to the County website 1,693,124 1,948,342 1,796,015 2,200,000 2,200,000 2,200,000Number of online payment options available to the public N/A N/A N/A N/A 2 5Number of total automated online forms N/A N/A 3 8 11 15Number of datasets available to the public through the Open Data Portal N/A N/A N/A N/A 4 8

Employee Growth and DevelopmentPercentage of IST employees receiving an annual performance evaluation 100% 97% 89% 100% 100% 100%Percentage of County employees who have completed ongoing security awareness training N/A N/A N/A N/A 50% 50%Number of IST Internships completed N/A N/A N/A N/A 3 6

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Information Services and TechnologyP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

Story Behind Performance

Mobile Apps Development of mobile apps, online payment options, and automated online forms are actions from the IST Strategic Plan 2016-2020. They also align to the County’s 5 Year Business Plan. The Advisory Committee for Technology, a group of department heads and assistant department heads across the County’s service areas, will select and prioritize these projects.

In FY 2014-15, the Restaurant Inspection Application and Marin County Fair Application were deployed. In FY 2015-16 the Voter Dashboard and Property Tax Bill applications were deployed.

Moving Processes Online

There are currently eight automated forms developed by and used in the County: Boards and Commissions Application, Community Service Fund Application, Community Development Agency (CDA) Inspection Form, CDA Pacific Gas and Electric Report Form, Marin County Parks Incident Report, Print Reproduction Requisition, Vote by Absentee Ballot Application, and Registrar of Voters Candidate Application.

Employee Growth and Development

The Information Services and Technology Department, as part of both the new IST Strategic Plan and the County 5 Year Business Plan, has developed new Performance Measures that were not previously tracked, due to this lack of historical data there are many ‘N/A’ on the measurements for previous years.

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Marin County Free LibraryP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Department Overview

The Marin County Free Library operates ten branch libraries in Marin under the authority of the Board of Supervisors.

The Library operates four outreach programs, including a bookmobile service to rural areas of the county plus services to senior, retirement and day care centers. The Library also operates the F.L.A.G.ship (Families Learning and Growing), which offers early literacy activities. The Library’s West Marin Literacy Service provides one-on-one tutoring, small classes, conversation groups and the Reading on the Ranches program in the summer. Lastly, the Library beyond Walls program delivers library materials to residents who cannot leave their home.

In addition, the Library offers traditional services including collection of materials for all ages, computers and technology, Spanish language collections, as well as historical collections in the Anne T. Kent California Room.

The Library’s ten branches are community living rooms, places where people enjoy lively programs, comfortable reading spaces, intellectual stimulation and quiet conversation.

The Library includes the following programs and activities: • Branch Operations• Technical Services• Outreach Services

Recent Accomplishments

• Emphasized STEAM (Science Technology Engineering Art Math) learning including introduction of 3D printing and partnership with New Media Learning for a Maker Space at the South Novato Library

• Partnered with the Novato Unified School District to create the Community Education Center and newly expanded South Novato Library

• Eliminated youth fines, allowing students a clean slate for renewed library use

• West Marin, Marin City and Fairfax partnered with local school districts to ensure every student in those regions received a library card

• Created a partnership with the Marin County Poet Laureate to co-host programs for the community

• Fairfax, Marin City, Bolinas, Inverness and Stinson Beach increased hours of operation thanks to funding made available by Measure A

• The Anne T. Kent California Room acquired two significant historical collections; the Schroeder Map collection (dating back to 1849) and the Marin County Fair Archives

• Technical Services and MARINet relocated to Los Gamos, a more cost effective space

Key Challenges and Outstanding Issues

• Providing traditional resources while significantly expanding digital and 24/7 services

• Expanding learning opportunities for Marin County youth by offering more creative and technology-based activities as an alternative to traditional library services

• Making the website up-to-date and mobile friendly• Updating facilities that are aging and undersized, poorly

equipped for the 21st century and have significant deferred maintenance

• Increasing and expanding early literacy programs to reach at risk families and youth

• Increasing diversity and inclusion in recruiting and retaining employees

FY 2015-16 Approved Budget

Department FTE 102.74Revenues $14,441,630Expenditures $16,850,644

Net County Cost $2,409,014

Create Connections for Our Community to Explore, Imagine and Innovate

marin l ibrary.org

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Goal I: Support youth in our community with opportunities for self-discovery and expression

Goal II: Be the preferred place for children, families and caregivers to connect, learn and grow together

Goal III: Be a positive environment for mobile and digital literacy

♦ Develop and codify agreements with Marin County School Districts to improve grade level reading levels across the County

♦ Provide Library cards to all youth in the Marin County Free Library (MCFL) jurisdiction by June 2018 and partner with city Libraries to ensure all students in non-MCFL jurisdictions receive library cards as well

♦ Identify a pilot group of students within the MCFL jurisdiction to begin analyzing the correlation between library usage and grade level reading achievement

♦ Partner with schools in West Marin, Marin City, and Novato to identify students reading below grade level and register at least 50 percent of those students in the MCFL Summer Learning Program

♦ Create targeted educational programs for 21st century learning outcomes which incorporate STEAM (Science Technology Engineering Art Math) principles by June 2018

♦ Increase broadband and Wi-Fi speeds across all facilities to work towards the goal of reaching a 1GB per second upload and download speed in all MCFL branches by June 2018

♦ Develop a plan to recruit and retain a diverse workforce by June 2018 with a focus on providing educational support and creating career pathways

♦ Ensure 100 percent of employees receive performance evaluations on an annual basis

♦ Increase the use and circulation of digital items by five percent per year

Initiatives

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Performance Measures 2012-13 Actual

2013-14 Actual

2014-15 Actual

2015-16 Target

2016-17 Target

2017-18 Target

Library UseNumber of visits to all branch libraries 1,046,825 961,943 1,045,756 1,150,000 1,300,000 1,500,000Number of items circulated 2,197,422 2,335,607 1,986,529 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000Number of electronic items circulated N/A N/A 90,578 95,100 99,855 104,879

School PartnershipsTotal number of partnerships established with K-12 school districts N/A N/A 4 8 10 12New library cards distributed to youth through partnerships N/A N/A 7,000 10,000 5,000 5,000

Story Behind Performance

Library Use The number of electronic items is a subset of overall circulation.

School Partnerships The number of formal agreements between Marin County School Districts and MCFL to provide cards to all students in the school district.

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Marin County ParksP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Department Overview

Marin County Parks includes County parks, planning and administration, landscape services, the open space district (MCOSD), and the countywide integrated pest management program.

The department is responsible for planning, acquiring, and managing the County’s approximately 16,000 acres of public open space and 249 miles of public trails, as well as the County’s park system that includes five regional parks, eight neighborhood parks, six bike paths, two boat ramps, 16 landscaping areas, and eight County Service Areas. Marin County Parks’ lands and facilities received over 6 million visits last year. The department also conducts and manages the countywide Integrated Pest Management Program (IPM). The department currently has 10 citizen advisory boards, including a citizen oversight committee that reviews Measure A expenditures annually.

Recent Accomplishments

• Completed Road and Trail Management Plan and successfully implemented year one of the plan, which included system designation for Regions 1 and 2, and project development for Region 1

• Master Planning efforts for three regional parks are in their final completion stage

• The Vegetation and Biodiversity Management Plan is in its final completion stage

• Completed phase 1 of the Stafford Lake Bike Park • Implemented year two of a five-year project to restore

Kent Island in Bolinas Lagoon• Acquired the Sky Ranch property• Installed a new playground at Castro Park• Renovated Homestead Valley Community Center• Installed a new shade structure at McInnis Marsh• Rebuilt bridge railings on Mill Valley Sausalito Path to

improve public safety

Key Challenges and Outstanding Issues

• Adapting our park facilities to threats posed from droughts, intense winter storms, changing temperatures, and sea level rise

• Developing strategies to fund capital improvements at parks and open space facilities that have recently been estimated at $150 million

• Implementing strategies to address equity issues by removing employment barriers and proactively reaching out to groups that have not utilized parks and open space programs and facilities

• Mitigating the effects of the continued in-migration and introduction of invasive species due to human activity within and at the borders of Open Space Preserves and Parks

• Responding to requests from visitors to develop illegal and legal trails within open space preserves

• Improving accessibility trails, facilities and program and adapting services to the aging demographic

FY 2015-16 Approved Budget*

Department FTE 79.25Revenues $12,706,718Expenditures $19,659,797

Net County Cost $6,953,079

*Budget figures do not include Open Space District

Marin County Parks is dedicated to educating, inspiring and engaging the people of Marin in the shared commitment of preserving, protecting and enriching the natural beauty of Marin’s parks and open spaces, and providing recreational opportunities for the enjoyment of all generations.

marincountyparks.org

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Goal I: Protect and restore our lands

Goal II: Grow and link the County’s system of parks, trails, and protected lands

Goal III: Foster discovery, learning and stewardship

Goal IV: Connect communities with the land for recreation and health

Goal V: Achieve sustainable long-term financial viability to satisfy operational needs, capital requirements, and desired programs and services

♦ Engage the community and cooperating agencies to prepare preliminary designs and conduct environmental review for the Bolinas North End Restoration Project to provide fish passage, restore marsh habitat, improve safety and adapt to sea level rise by June 2018

♦ Initiate construction drawings for McInnis Park, including realigned entry road, dog park, parking and three multi-use fields by June 2017

♦ Implement Road and Trail Management Plan projects at Fairway, Octopus, Candalero and Gas Line Trails to reduce the environmental impact of the Open Space road and trail system by June 2017

♦ Install entry, wayfinding, and junction signage at all preserves within the Road and Trail Regions 1 and 2 by June 2017

♦ Update website to be a compliant, mobile design that includes software for online reservations, permitting, and donations by June 2017

♦ Conduct engineering and design work related to Sausalito Street road and trail repairs by June 2017

♦ Design, permit and construct improvements at Agate Beach to provide for greater accessibility by June 2017

♦ Design a bridge at Stafford Lake to replace the current crossing of Novato Creek by June 2017

♦ Conduct biotic assessments and engage the community in efforts toward designation of the Road and Trail system for Regions 3 and 4 by June 2017

♦ Conduct a vegetation assessment in the newly acquired Sky Ranch property by June 2017

♦ Conduct a feasibility study on a potential project to extend the Cross Marin Trail from Platform Bridge Road to Point Reyes Station by June 2017

♦ Conduct feasibility, design and environmental review on the Juniper, Haute Lagunitas and Split Rock trails as part of Region 2 Road and Trail designation process by June 2017

♦ Replace McInnis Tennis Courts surfacing to provide for safety and improve play by June 2017

♦ Design and engineer Cascade Canyon Sediment Reduction Project Phase 1 by June 2017

♦ Maintain previous phases and construct new phase in wide area fuel breaks in Camino Alto, Alto Bowl and lower Ryder Ridge by June 2017

♦ Work with the Department of Public Works to resolve encroachments in Ring Mountain Preserve by June 2017

♦ Address deferred maintenance on Burdell Fire Road, Gunshot Fire Road, Smith Ridge Fire Road and Irving Fire Road by June 2017

♦ Improve equity in the hiring process by including representatives of minority communities on each interview panel

♦ Invest in career growth and development by formalizing a training program for seasonal employees by June 2017

♦ Replace railing at Paradise Pier to meet code and bring design in line with the master planned sea wall by June 2018

♦ Design and permit stock pond habitat enhancement project at Mount Burdell Preserve by June 2018

♦ Conduct Endangered Jewel Flower Recovery project in Ring Mountain Preserve by June 2018

Initiatives

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Marin County ParksP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Performance Measures 2012-13 Actual

2013-14 Actual

2014-15 Actual

2015-16 Target

2016-17 Target

2017-18 Target

Invasive Pest ControlInvasive species cover within fuel breaks N/A N/A N/A N/A 90% 90%

Revenue SourcesTotal annual pass revenue collected $24,216 $24,672 $23,934 $23,000 $23,000 $23,690Golf course revenue $428,100 $453,884 $461,803 $450,000 $450,000 $450,000McInnis ball field rental $69,958 $50,171 $68,554 $60,000 $53,218 $22,851

Community InvolvementNumber of volunteer hours worked in Parks and Open Space1 23,621 18,187 17,873 28,000 18,000 20,000Number of Environmental Education Programs2 99 101 130 100 110 110

Story Behind Performance

Invasive Pest Control

Invasive species cover is estimated using the CalFlora application for mapping invasive plant cover. Mechanical vegetation management has not proven effective at controlling the spread of invasive plants, but in the last five years and with the targeted use of herbicides in combination with mechanical treatments, efforts have effectively stopped the growth of invasive plant colonies within fuel breaks. With continued efforts, the objective is to stop the spread of invasive plants and then slowly decrease the coverage over coming decades.

Revenue Sources McInnis ball field rental income may be affected in FY 2017-18 due to construction in the field areas; however construction activities will result in improved facilities and increased income generation potential in the long term. Golf Course revenue figures represent the County’s share.

Community Involvement

1. The number of volunteer hours has dropped since FY 2010-11 due to a change in tracking methodology and an increased focus on projects that are aligned with departmental priorities. Some priority projects are in areas that can only accommodate a limited number of participants.

2. Parks provides educational programming including programs for school groups, community groups, public hikes and talks and other interpretive programs.

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ProbationP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Core Values

• Personal and professional integrity, growth and development

• Respect for each person’s individuality, experience and contributions

• Awareness of and respect for cultural diversity • Empowerment through communication, collaboration

and cooperation • Individual and organizational competence, fairness and

accountability

Operating Principles

• We believe people can change and we can be instrumental in assisting in that change

• We protect the community through the use of evidence-based practices, emphasizing rehabilitation, accountability and community justice

• We continuously strive to reduce the impact of crime and conflict on victims and the community

• We respect the dignity of every individual • We are committed to ongoing learning, to personal and

professional development and to making use of our individual and collective experiences

• We function as a cooperative team, emphasizing ongoing communication, both internally and in conjunction with other departments, agencies, our partners and stakeholders

• We promote personal productivity, health, and balance in a safe, supportive and respectful working environment in support of the department’s mission

• We are committed to continuous evaluation and improvement of our programs, practices and interactions

Department Overview

Under the authority of law and the Marin County Courts, the Probation Department serves to protect the community through its role in conducting investigations and working with the courts on decisions pertaining to sentencing matters, and in providing alternatives to incarceration for qualified offenders. The department is charged with supervising adult and juvenile offenders in the community and works collaboratively with law enforcement agencies and community-based organizations to ensure that court orders are enforced.

The County of Marin Probation Department offers an array of mandated and optional services for the court, adult and youthful offenders, victims of crime, and the diverse communities of Marin. In addition, the department has developed strong partnerships with the courts, law enforcement, District Attorney, Public Defender, Health and Human Services, schools and local community organizations to develop outreach programs to strengthen family and youth resiliency and target behaviors that drive criminal activity. Our department prides itself on offering a balance between public safety, offender accountability, rehabilitative services and restorative practices.Through our support of proven and cost effective practices and programs, we remain committed to a process of continual improvement of services in partnership with the communities we serve.

FY 2015-16 Approved Budget

Department FTE 111.97Revenues $10,654,816Expenditures $21,187,403

Net County Cost $10,532,587

The mission of the Marin County Probation Department is to further justice and community safety and to hold offenders accountable while promoting their rehabilitation.

marincounty.org/probat ion

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Recent Accomplishments

• Adult Services orchestrated four field operation nights to conduct unannounced searches on clients and approximately 98 percent of the clients were found in compliance and were acknowledged for it

• Implemented Marin Turning Around Youth (M-TAY), a specialized caseload in the Adult Division that provides additional support to offenders ages 18-25

• Completed phase two of the Adult Case Management System, moving to a web-based platform, and allowing us to equip field officers with tablets for efficient access while out in the field

• Launched Marin Youth Home (MY Home), the first local foster care home dedicated to serving delinquent youth

• Completed renovation of Juvenile Services Center facility, improving security and heating/cooling features to make it a safe, welcoming and comfortable building for both staff and the public

Key Challenges and Outstanding Issues

• Increase in the number of clients with mental illness• Continuing impact of Public Safety Realignment• Availability of stable funding for services in the Juvenile

Division• Staff turnover and ability to attract new staff • Increasing need for staff and services in Spanish

to better serve monolingual parents and to provide culturally sensitive services to adult offenders

• Effectively serving our detained youth in a cost efficient manner

• Increase in opiate use among residents

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Goal I: Reduce recidivism and increase the percentage of clients who successfully complete their conditions of probation

Goal II: Improve the effectiveness and efficiency of Probation programs

Goal III: Utilize training and staff development opportunities to ensure high level of employee performance

Goal IV: Promote the values and principles of community justice

♦ Recruit a Restorative Justice Program Coordinator to work with criminal justice partner agencies in the implementation of restorative processes and practices in the adult population by June 2017

♦ Work with the Department of Public Works to finalize the Adult Division space planning and remodeling, and initiate Phase I of the project that will result in a new and more secure and safe environment for staff and clients by June 2017

♦ Continue to work with Information Services and Technology to upgrade case management systems, build mobile apps and better utilize information management and technology to become more user friendly to staff, partners and clients

♦ Mobilize and empower staff who have graduated from the Leadership Academy to plan and develop the department’s annual organizational development, including facilitating staff input and designing at minimum one department wide event to occur in the spring of 2017

♦ Reduce high risk case load levels and implement an integrated assessment tool and case plan in the adult case management system to prepare for the Total Case Management (TCM) claims in an effort to maximize available funding sources to offset the cost of probation services by June 2018

♦ Work with the Division of Mental Health and Substance Use Services in FY 2016-17 to ensure treatment providers maximize federal reimbursem*nt for newly eligible treatment services under the Drug-Medi-Cal expansion

♦ Enhance our public website content with increased program information, including the availability of fillable applications and enrollment forms, and also create a social media presence on at least one major platform (i.e. Facebook, Twitter, etc.) to better articulate the mission and role of Probation to the community

Initiatives

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Performance Measures 2012-13 Actual

2013-14 Actual

2014-15 Actual

2015-16 Target

2016-17 Target

2017-18 Target

Adult Supervision and RecidivismNumber of adult probation cases supervised annually1 2,355 2,289 1,955 2,100 2,100 2,100Average number of cases served per probation officer over the year2 147 91 82 120 91 91Number of probationers convicted of a new felony offense while under supervision 47 42 65 30 30 30Number of probationers convicted of a new misdemeanor offense while under supervision 81 N/A 105 75 75 75Percent of Adult clients successfully completing probation 57% 66% 72% 75% 80% 80%Rate of recidivism for Adult probationers 5% 2% 9% 5% 5% 5%Number of adults on felony probation 937 N/A 885 900 900 900Rate of adult probationers sentenced to state prison 2% 2% 2% 2% 2% 2%

Post-Release SupervisionNumber of Post-Release Community Supervision (PRCS) cases released to Marin County3 38 32 30 N/A N/A N/ANumber of Mandatory Supervision (MS) cases sentenced to Marin County 15 N/A 33 25 30 30Total number of PRCS/MS participants per Probation Officer served over the year 27 32 39 30 30 30Rate of MS/PRCS cases successfully completing their program with no new felony or misdemeanor conviction 97% 95% 91% 95% 95% 95%

Juvenile Probation CasesNumber of cases supervised in Juvenile Division Supervision Units (annually) 167 181 176 170 170 170Average number of juvenile cases per probation officer at any given time during the year 14 15 13.5 15 15 15Percentage of cases that successfully completed probation 72% 73% 72% 75% 75% 75%Percentage of supervision cases that close successfully that are not cited again within 12 months 68% N/A 71% 72% 74% 75%

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Performance Measures 2012-13 Actual

2013-14 Actual

2014-15 Actual

2015-16 Target

2016-17 Target

2017-18 Target

Juvenile HallNumber of youth surveyed after detention 227 191 210 220 200 200Rate of youth reporting they felt safe during detention 96% 99% 97% 100% 100% 100%Rate of youth reporting they were treated with respect during detention 97% 97% 96% 100% 100% 100%

Juvenile Detention for Technical ViolationsTotal number of bookings for technical violations of probation for High and Very High risk cases (violations of Home Detention and Electronic Monitoring, warrant or remand) 167 115 157 130 130 130

Victim RestitutionNumber of juvenile probation cases with an order of restitution 28 N/A 20 30 30 30Percentage of restitution dollars owed by juvenile probationers that are paid before case closure 73% N/A 89% 90% 90% 90%Percentage of victims (of crimes committed by a juvenile) made whole before case closure 88% N/A 70% 90% 90% 90%

Employee DevelopmentPercent of employees receiving an annual evaluation 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%Percent of employees completing their annual mandated State Training Corrections (STC) Training hours 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%Number of staff attending Leadership Academy 2 3 2 2 2 2Number of Management Staff attending Human Resources Academy 3 2 0 2 1 2Average number of STC mandated training hours completed per sworn staff member 103 93 104 100 100 100

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Story Behind Performance

Adult Supervision and Recidivism

1. The average term of Probation is three years. This count reflects the total number of cases supervised throughout the year, including those opened in a previous year.

2. Case loads are assigned by client risk levels. Average caseloads for Medium Risk cases are set at 80, high risk are set at 40, and several hundred cases are carried by Probation Officers supervising the lowest risk cases.

Post-Release Supervision

3. While it was originally expected that the numbers of persons released from the prison system to the supervision of the local probation offices would decline over the course of time based on new sentencing guidelines, the numbers have remained steady. There continues to be debate on the amendment of legislation to reclassify additional prison populations as eligible for Post-Release Community Supervision (PRCS), thus making projections unreliable.

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Public DefenderP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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The mission of the Office of the Public Defender is to provide effective and innovative legal services for clients by protecting their constitutional rights, treating them with respect and encouraging them to lead productive and positive lives.

Department Overview

The Office of the Public Defender provides legal representation for those assessed to be indigent and unable to afford counsel. Public Defender staff represents clients in felony, misdemeanor, juvenile, and family support cases, as well as in cases involving mental health or probate code conservatorship actions. The office is committed to ensuring representation that meets the constitutional, statutory, and decisional requirements of law that guarantee every indigent person effective assistance of counsel before the courts.

Recent Accomplishments

• Created an office collaboration committee to enhance office communication

• Supported team building initiatives that engaged staff in decision making collaboration

• Received a Spirit of Marin award by the Bank of Marin and Hispanic Chamber of Commerce for volunteer service

• Continued collaboration with criminal justice stakeholders on AB109 community partnership board

• Sustained participation in the criminal justice therapeutic courts, including STAR mental health court, Adult and Juvenile Drug Courts, and Family Violence Court

• Continued participation in Marin County/Dominican University Leadership Academy, resulting in seven graduates from the program since 2013

Key Challenges and Outstanding Issues

• Increased misdemeanor caseloads resulting from Proposition 47, which shifted certain lower level, non-violent felonies to the misdemeanor court

• Collaborating with juvenile justice stakeholder partners to tailor restorative justice and other incarceration alternatives towards the growing Latino youth demographic

• Partnering with immigration attorneys to comply with new federal laws that mandate a more thorough review of the immigration impacts associated with plea bargained sentences

• Enhancing the effectiveness of holistic representation by having more clients complete drug, alcohol, and mental health programs

• Supporting the County’s 5 Year Business Plan and its focus on diversity, innovation, employee development, and communication

FY 2015-16 Approved Budget

Department FTE 37.50Revenues $1,824,692Expenditures $7,432,893

Net County Cost $5,608,201

marincounty.org/pd

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Public DefenderP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Goal I: Increase employee growth and development through employee-created initiatives

Goal II: Create partnerships with other County departments and with community organizations to provide more comprehensive and holistic service to our clients

Goal III: Use innovative technology to improve our public service

Goal IV: Become a more diverse and inclusive department

♦ By June 2018, 18 staff will be engaged in our employee-created Employee Growth and Development Plan, with the goal that 70 percent of the participants report that they grew personally and/or professionally and that they now find their work more meaningful

♦ By June 2018, 100 percent of all interested clients are assessed for referral and are given the opportunity to voluntarily participate in holistic services to help them become more stable and productive citizens

♦ By June 2017, upgrade the case management system (Gideon) through employee generated feedback and collaboration with the Information Services and Technology (IST) department to reflect recent changes in our organizational structure and to enable the department to capture meaningful caseload and performance data

♦ Participate as a pilot department in the Leadership Academy‘s Diversity and Inclusion Program in FY 2016-17 and utilize the Hiring Managers Toolkit to recruit more diverse talent.

♦ Provide two cultural competency trainings for Public Defender staff each year.

Initiatives

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Public DefenderP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Performance Measures 2012-13 Actual

2013-14 Actual

2014-15 Actual

2015-16 Target

2016-17 Target

2017-18 Target

Employee DevelopmentNumber of employees engaged in Employee Growth and Development Plan N/A N/A N/A N/A 12 18Percentage of employees who report that their engagement in this Plan resulted in personal or career growth and that their work is now more meaningful to them N/A N/A N/A N/A 50% 70%Number of cultural competency trainings offered to employees N/A N/A N/A N/A 2 2

GideonNumber of data entries into Gideon regarding specific work done on cases N/A N/A 32,991 33,000 34,000 35,000Number of FTEs inputting data into Gideon regarding specific work done on cases N/A N/A 25 30 32 33Percentage of performance evaluations acknowledging data collected from Gideon N/A N/A 100% 100% 100% 100%

OutreachNumber of holistic services projects/trainings conducted with other County Departments N/A N/A N/A N/A 7 9Number of community events our employees attend as representatives of the Public Defender’s office N/A N/A 10 12 14 15Number of employees attending community events N/A N/A 5 6 8 9

Client ServicesPercentage of clients assessed for holistic service needs N/A N/A N/A N/A 80% 100%Number of clients referred to services (mental health, medical, social, substance abuse, re-entry, and veterans) N/A N/A N/A N/A 500 800Number of successful case expungements N/A N/A N/A N/A 100 125Number of client cases successfully reduced from felonies to misdemeanors before the expiration date of Proposition 47 in November of 2017 N/A N/A N/A N/A 200 75

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Public DefenderP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Story Behind Performance

Employee Development

In alignment with the County’s 5 Year Business Plan, our staff will create an Employee Growth and Development plan. Through this plan, we hope that our employees will grow in their careers as well as personally which will enhance their ability to better serve our clients.

Gideon Gideon is the department’s case management software. We want to collect data that shows the work done by our staff including referring our clients to mental health, substance abuse, and veteran assistance. The goal is to ensure that all client centered work is acknowledged and appreciated.

Outreach We want to capture the quantity and quality of our community outreach. The goal is to have evidence based data that shows how our staff is forming partnerships in the community to help us provide more comprehensive and holistic services to our clients.

Client Services The Public Defender’s job is to not just to provide excellent legal representation defending against criminal charges, but to also fully assess our clients’ other needs to ensure that they have an opportunity to become a productive member of our community.

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Department of Public WorksP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Department Overview

The Department of Public Works administers a variety of programs including capital, disability access, and engineering projects; maintenance of county roads and buildings, communications facilities and vehicles; flood control, watershed planning, land development and permitting, fish passage and stream restoration, storm water management and pollution prevention; waste management; traffic and transportation planning; Gnoss Field Airport operations; and general service functions such as accounting and administration, purchasing, printing services, and real estate.

FY 2015-16 Approved Budget

Department FTE 233.53Revenues $32,061,881Expenditures $46,626,923

Net County Cost $14,365,042

Recent Accomplishments

Capital, Disability Access and Engineering Projects• Completed over $2.3 million in accessibility projects,

including facility and pedestrian right-of-way projects• Completed design of multi-modal improvements to

Civic Center Drive, connecting the future SMART station to the Civic Center

• Provided construction management services for the Central Marin Ferry Connection, which will provide pedestrian and bicycle access from the Cal Park Tunnel to the Larkspur Ferry Terminal

• Completed construction of electric vehicle charging stations at the new Emergency Operations Facility, the Civic Center Administration Building parking lot, and the 20 North San Pedro office building

• Completed a multi-year fire detection and alarm replacement at the Civic Center, including disability access improvements and public address system

• Worked with the County Administrator to provide support in planning and implementing the reallocation and renovation of the vacated Sheriff space at the Civic Center

• Relocated County staff from leased office space to other County office locations

• Remodeled Woodacre Fire Station dormitory to create female dormitory room and restroom

• Relocated the Sheriff’s substation at College of Marin• Replaced center section of the County Jail roof due to

age and roof condition

Maintenance of County Roads, Buildings, Communications Facilities, Vehicles, and Airport• Implemented resurfacing program that overlayed or

seal coated 25 centerline miles of County road in FY 2015-16

• Awarded a Federal Lands Access Program (FLAP) grant for Muir Woods Road reconstruction. The Federal Highway Administration will perform the work and construction is anticipated in FY 2018-19.

• The FLAP-funded resurfacing project for Sir Francis Drake Blvd in Pt. Reyes National Seashore is in the final environmental clearance phase and construction is expected in early 2018

• Initiated a project for the next generation Marin Emergency Radio Authority (MERA) system technologies, and secured funding to replace the existing aging system

• Implemented an electronic, GPS-based fleet maintenance system to track required service and vehicle locations and to increase program efficiency by reducing maintenance costs

The mission of the Public Works Department is to serve the people of Marin by providing a safe, sustainable environment and enhanced quality of life through improvements to and maintenance of public infrastructure, and to provide timely and efficient service and support to other County departments and local agencies to assist them in achieving their goals.

marincounty.org/pw

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Department of Public WorksP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

• Initiated a one-year wildlife hazard assessment at the Gnoss Field Airport with field work expected to be completed in June 2016. Results of the study will be used to compile a Wildlife Management Plan to enhance wildlife protection at the airport.

• Approved the contract to install an updated Automated Weather Observation System at Gnoss Field that will improve the safety of take-offs and landings through more reliable weather observation features

• Initiated an Airport Pavement Management Plan to assess pavement and subsurface conditions at Gnoss Field to use in a runway/taxiway pavement rehabilitation design

Flood Control, Watershed Planning, Land Development and Permitting• Completed the Richardson Bay Shoreline Study, a sea

level rise planning adaptation report• Initiated design and environmental review of Phoenix

Lake Reservoir Flood Control Retrofit and initiated engineering investigations and assessments of two other detention basin sites

• Initiated review of alternatives for the Watershed Program and continuing stakeholder outreach efforts to refine alternatives in Novato, Southern Marin, Las Gallinas, and Stinson Beach.

• Through participation in the FEMA Community Rating System program, implemented flood risk reduction measures to provide homeowners with a 15% reduction in flood insurance policies for structures in designated special flood hazard areas

• Implemented a web-based recording and reporting system to make inspection information of underground fuel storage tanks and hazardous materials storage sites available to the public, emergency responders, and the California EPA

Fish Passage and Stream Restoration, Storm Water Management and Pollution Prevention• Implemented training of County and local agency

maintenance staff regarding new Best Management Practices in compliance with the state’s Phase II National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit conditions and developed inspection forms and procedures for assessment of all municipal facilities

Traffic and Transportation Planning• Initiated a comprehensive study of the Sir Francis

Drake Boulevard corridor from Highway 101 to Ross to analyze potential improvements for traffic flow, transit users, pedestrians, and cyclists in preparation for a roadway rehabilitation project

• Prepared plans and specifications for Muir Woods Road parking barriers and provided to the National Park Service to construct

• Adopted tour bus restrictions and additional parking restrictions for Muir Woods Road

Real Estate• In partnership with local agencies, provided state-

certified right of way services under current contracts with San Rafael, Larkspur, and Sonoma County, and sought opportunities with other interested agencies

• Acquired property at 800 San Anselmo Avenue, and completed lease between the Flood Control District and the Town of San Anselmo, pending the Town’s purchase of the property for a flood control project

• Supported right-of-way acquisitions including the Central Marin Ferry Connection

Key Challenges and Outstanding Issues

Regulatory MandatesEver-increasing requirements to comply with the mandates of various regulatory agencies, such as:• Increasing costs and time to comply with the California

Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and to establish community support for projects

• The California Air Resources Board (CARB) requires all heavy-duty diesel trucks that operate in California to retrofit or replace engines in order to reduce diesel emissions. All applicable County vehicles are required to be a minimum of 2010 model year by January 1, 2023.

• Developing skills and innovative solutions to design and build large projects under increasingly restrictive procurement regulations

• Securing permits and managing grants with state and federal agencies continue to become more challenging and time consuming

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Department of Public WorksP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

Maintenance of County Roads, Buildings, Communications Facilities, Vehicles, Airport and Capital Improvements• Identifying funding sources and operational strategies

to address the deferred maintenance of County buildings and flood control facilities

• Declining state and federal gas tax revenue, which funds County road maintenance

• Maintaining the momentum in funding the Road and Bridge Program to maintain the current Pavement Condition Index (PCI) and optimizing efficiency and cost-effectiveness of roads programs and surface treatments.

• Implementing Next Generation Marin Emergency Radio Authority (MERA) system technologies while maintaining the reliability and integrity of the existing system

• Identifying opportunities for improving water and energy efficiency, such as increasing reclaimed water use, solar photovoltaic generation, adding additional electric vehicle charging stations

• Managing an additional $25.5 million in facility improvements, and a $6 million fire station replacement/refurbishment through the Capital Improvement Program

• Securing grant funding for Gnoss Field Airport improvements and facilitating the completion by the Federal Aviation Commission (FAA) of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the runway extension

Flood Control, Watershed Planning, Land Development and Permitting• Managing expectations around large, unfunded need

for flood control, watershed and sea level rise planning and mitigation projects while identifying, evaluating and securing funding alternatives and opportunities

• Reevaluating planned flood control and watershed projects to be more competitive for grants that are increasingly designed to address drought mitigation

• Remaining attentive to climate change issues, promoting community outreach with FEMA as they implement Flood Insurance Rate Map updates, and continuing to participate in the FEMA Community Rating System program to reduce flood insurance costs

for unincorporated Marin residents• Maintaining momentum in the Ross Valley Flood

Control Program by securing additional state and federal funding for projects

• Continuing the inspection, monitoring and reporting program for the San Rafael Rock Quarry as the Quarry prepares for an anticipated major reclamation phase

• Continuing inspection and monitoring of the Marin General Hospital improvements

Fish Passage and Stream Restoration, Storm Water Management and Pollution Prevention• Complying with State Water Quality Control Board

mandates for significantly expanded stormwater quality control measures under their newly adopted “Phase II” permit and for their required specialized monitoring of the Duxbury Reef “Area of Special Biological Significance”

• Complying with and funding implementation of the Lagunitas Creek Watershed Sediment Total Maximum Daily Load (Sediment TMDL) requirements adopted by the Regional Water Quality Control Board (June 2014). The Sediment TMDL requires a paved roads sediment delivery assessment by June 2019 and implementation of paved roads sediment delivery reduction projects to achieve compliance by June 2034

Traffic/Transportation Planning• Addressing increased traffic due to the rebounding

economy and regional population growth with limited opportunities to expand roadway capacity

Staffing and General Services• Maintaining current service levels during an expected

increase in staff turnover

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Department of Public WorksP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

Goal I: Work together to be a more responsive government by becoming a more adaptive organization where we encourage engagement, learning and leadership at all levels

Goal II: Provide effective infrastructure construction and maintenance

Goal III: Enhance quality of life by protecting and restoring environmental resources through sustainability programs that address climate change and sea level rise

♦ Engage employees in development of two-year work plans and key metrics through staff meetings in FY 2016-17

♦ All employees receive a meaningful yearly performance evaluation

♦ Identify opportunities for stretch assignments to support ongoing employee growth and succession planning in FY 2016-17

♦ Support employee training initiatives

♦ Restructure the Public Works Purchasing Division in FY 2016-17 to better meet countywide procurement needs

♦ Implement County Road resurfacing program to overlay or seal coat 25 centerline miles per year

♦ Implement a program to replace four bridges and retrofit one bridge and begin construction by June 2018

♦ On behalf of 25 local emergency response agencies, implement the Next Generation Marin Emergency Radio Authority (MERA) system; which includes awarding the vendor contract, completing preliminary designs and preparing the CEQA determination in FY 2016-17, and completing the designs, constructing site improvements and beginning the installation and testing of the new system FY 2017-18

♦ Work with Cultural Services to assess and prioritize deferred maintenance at the Marin Center by June 2017

♦ Finalize environmental clearance, complete design, and begin construction on the FLAP grant-funded project on Sir Francis Drake Blvd. in Pt. Reyes National Seashore by June 2017

♦ Complete environmental process for the FLAP grant-funded project on Muir Woods Road by June 2018

♦ Complete construction of multi-modal Civic Center Drive Improvements in FY 2016-17, connecting the future Civic Center SMART train station with the County Civic Center campus, Marin Center and Lagoon Park

♦ Prepare both fiscally and operationally for a new set of trash control requirements that are expected to be added to the state’s Phase II Stormwater Permit by June 2018, which will give County ten years to install trash capture devices and implement controls to achieve zero discharge of trash larger than 5mm from the County storm drain system to Marin watercourses and the bay

♦ Complete Civic Center roof replacement assessment and design in FY 2016-17, and commence construction in FY 2017-18

♦ Complete Tomales Fire Station replacement assessment and design in FY 2016-17, and commence construction in FY 2017-18

♦ As funding is identified, implement strategies from the Climate Action Plan adopted by the Board of Supervisors on November 10, 2015.

♦ Complete solar power installation projects at Nicasio Yard and the H&HS Campus on Kerner Blvd. by June 2018

♦ Implement BayWAVE by June 2017, completing a focused vulnerability assessment of the eastern Marin shoreline that evaluates the extent of impacted assets and assesses the sensitivity and adaptability of selected assets through a public process in collaboration with cities, towns and other stakeholders

Initiatives

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Department of Public WorksP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

Performance Measures 2012-13 Actual

2013-14 Actual

2014-15 Actual

2015-16 Target

2016-17 Target

2017-18 Target

Recycling ProgramsCountywide diversion rate (Percent of waste diverted from landfills) 76% 74% 75% 80% 80% 80%

RoadsAverage Pavement Condition Index (PCI) Countywide local streets and roads1 63 65 64 N/A N/A N/AAverage Pavement Condition Index (PCI) of unincorporated County road system2 57 60 60 60 60 60

Reducing Environmental ImpactKilowatt-hours of energy used by County facilities (in thousands)3 16,150 15,347 14,966 14,966 14,816 14,816Amount of solar photovoltaic installed on County properties (in kW) 534 534 1,000 1,000 1,061 1,061Number of hybrid and plug-in electric vehicles in fleet 64 67 70 70 70 70Marin County residents’ average commute time in minutes4 29 29 33 N/A N/A N/A

Story Behind Performance

Roads 1. Annual countywide PCI includes all cities and towns. Please note that other reports sometimes use a 3-year average. The County does not set targets for countywide PCI.

2. The PCI for unincorporated roads has increased significantly over the past seven years, from a score of 49 in FY 2008-09 to a score of 60 in FY 2015-16. Targets for FY 2016-17 and FY 2017-18 are based on current funding levels, which is sufficient to maintain the current PCI.

Reducing Environmental Impact

3. Includes 61 County buildings/facilities, pump stations, and streetlights.

4. Average commute times are a statistical indicator and not directly under the control of the department.

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Sheriff – CoronerP E R F O R M A N C E P L A N • FY 2016 - 18

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Department Overview

The Sheriff-Coroner is the lead law enforcement agency for Marin County with a role in law enforcement defined by statute and by social and historic events. The department is headed by the elected Sheriff-Coroner, Robert T. Doyle. Sheriff Doyle’s executive command staff consists of an undersheriff and three captains. The department strives to be receptive and responsive to the expectations of the community’s needs through daily interactions with residents. This provides feedback on job performance and relationships with the community. The department is committed to being a model organization providing the best, most efficient, and most professional law enforcement services to residents of Marin County. The department provides a myriad of law enforcement services to the County of Marin. The Bureau of Detention Services oversees the operation of the County Jail and security for the Marin County Superior Court. The Bureau of Field Services oversees the operation of all patrol and criminal investigative services. The Bureau of Administration and Support Services oversees the operation of the Sheriff’s Business Office, Records, Warrants, and Civil Divisions, the Sheriff’s Public Safety Communications Division, Professional Standards Unit, Technical Support Unit, and the Sheriff’s Office of Emergency Services. Effective January 3, 2011, the Sheriff’s Office incorporated the functions of the Coroner into a new elected Sheriff-Coroner’s Department as approved by the Board of Supervisors in 2010. As a result of this consolidation, the department is also now responsible for investigating the cause and manner of all sudden or unexpected deaths within the County, or natural deaths where the person has not been seen under the close care of a physician.

Recent Accomplishments

• Completed an agreement with Central Marin Police Authority to provide communications dispatch services

• Streamlined and revised recruitment strategies to better fill vacancies

• Expanded jail staffing to include a social worker from Health and Human Services

• Implemented a new Computer Aided Dispatch system• Expanded social media efforts to include Nixel and

Twitter• Upgraded report managing system software

Key Challenges and Outstanding Issues

• Managing staff turnover• Increasing Sheriff’s presence on social media• Acquiring and maintaining new technology platforms,

including body worn cameras

FY 2015-16 Approved Budget

Department FTE 309.30Revenues $25,519,808Expenditures $66,790,639

Net County Cost $41,270,831

The Marin County Sheriff’s Office is committed to partnering with our communities to provide leadership and excellence in public safety. Our Core Values:Partnership, Leadership, Excellence

marinsher i f f .org

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Goal I: Provide excellent public safety call-answering and dispatch services

Goal II: Provide excellent emergency management services

Goal III: Provide excellent automated systems to support public safety effectiveness and efficiency

Goal IV: Provide quality and efficient detention services to individuals requiring incarceration in Marin County

Goal V: Provide excellent customer service in the Documentary Services Division

Goal VI: Conduct death investigations in a timely manner

♦ Implement an online crime reporting system in FY 2016-17 for minor crimes that enables residents to complete a crime report online rather than wait for a patrol officer to be dispatched to meet with them

♦ Implement body worn cameras on all patrol deputies in FY 2016-17

♦ Implement a new performance evaluation process by June 2017 and complete 100 percent of all employee performance evaluations on time

♦ Establish an internal Leadership Academy with the vision to provide ongoing leadership training to all employees. A formal Leadership Development Program is being developed, with the class meeting monthly for six months. The content of the class is currently in the development phase but is on track to be launched in FY 2016-17. The department is also exploring the idea of creating a library of leadership materials for employees.

♦ Update the Sheriff’s website by June 2017 to facilitate better interaction with the community. The Sheriff’s Office is partnering with an outside marketing firm to redesign the website to allow numerous internal users to update and change current information in a timely manner and make the website more interactive and easier to use for the end user.

♦ Conduct ongoing outreach to school age children including hosting at least two Youth Academies each fiscal year. This outreach includes a School Resource Officer responsible for building a liaison with school administration and the student body and coordinating the Youth Academy program, which exposes the youth to the Sheriff’s department in an academic environment.

Initiatives

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Performance Measures 2012-13 Actual

2013-14 Actual

2014-15 Actual

2015-16 Anticipated

2016-17 Anticipated

2017-18 Anticipated

Marin County JailAnnual number of people booked in the Marin County Jail 7,761 7,619 7,511 7,144 6,500 6,000Annual average daily jail population 289 287 266 280 280 280

Crime StatisticsNumber of violent crimes reported 999 1,059 998 1,000 1,000 1,000Number of property crimes reported 4,933 5,299 5,934 6,000 6,200 6,400

Dispatch ServicesAnnual total number of 911 calls processed by the Communications Center 24,796 41,702 44,104 52,900 54,000 55,000Annual total number of events processed by the Communications Center 143,490 141,983 146,091 148,000 150,000 152,000

CoronerTotal death cases reported to the Coroner Division 945 N/A 956 893 900 910

Story Behind Performance

Marin County Jail The number of jail bookings is expected to decline as a result of Proposition 47, which reduced nonviolent crimes from felonies to misdemeanors.

Crime Statistics It is anticipated that Proposition 47 may lead to increased commission of lower level property crimes due to the fact that law enforcement will potentially be issuing citations rather than arresting offenders.

Dispatch Services The number of processed 911 calls is expected to increase significantly beginning in FY 2015-16 due to the dispatch contract with Central Marin Police Authority.

An event is any contact the Communications Dispatcher has with field units. This includes all calls for service including non 911 events and all other self-initiated activity generated by any and all field units.

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Collaborative Performance Management System

PROCESS GUIDE UPDATED AUGUST 11, 2010

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

WHAT IS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT? ............................................................................................. 3

PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT CYCLE ................................................................................................... 4

PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES ................................................... 5

PERFORMANCE PLANNING AND GOAL SETTING ................................................................................. 6

PREPARATION - DOCUMENTS TO REVIEW ............................................................................................................. 7

CONDUCTING THE PERFORMANCE PLANNING SESSION ........................................................................................ 8

PERFORMANCE FACTORS AND CLASSIFICATION SPECIFICATION .......................................................................... 8

GOAL SETTING ..................................................................................................................................................... 9

PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT GOALS ............................................................................................................... 10

SMART GOALS ................................................................................................................................................. 10

PERFORMANCE FEEDBACK AND COACHING ....................................................................................... 13

OBSERVATION .................................................................................................................................................... 14

DOCUMENTATION ............................................................................................................................................... 14

PROVIDING FEEDBACK ....................................................................................................................................... 14

VALUE-ADDED FEEDBACK ................................................................................................................................. 15

MODEL FOR GIVING VALUE-ADDED FEEDBACK ................................................................................................. 16

VALUE-ADDED FEEDBACK ................................................................................................................................. 18

DEALING WITH PUSH BACK ................................................................................................................................ 18

COACHING APPROACH ....................................................................................................................................... 19

PERFORMANCE ISSUES ....................................................................................................................................... 20

PERFORMANCE REVIEW AND EVALUATION ........................................................................................ 21

TIMING ............................................................................................................................................................... 21

WHAT’S INVOLVED IN THIS PROCESS? ................................................................................................................ 22

RATING LEVELS ................................................................................................................................................. 25

OVERALL RATING .............................................................................................................................................. 26

TOOLS AND RESOURCES .............................................................................................................................. 28

LMS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT MODULE ................................................................................................... 28

OTHER ONLINE RESOURCES ............................................................................................................................... 28

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San Mateo County Collaborative Performance Management System Guide | What is Performance Management? 3

WHAT IS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT?

Performance management is really about good people management. Technically it is defined as a systematic

and ongoing process of communication and collaboration between a supervisor and an employee that occurs

throughout the year, in support of accomplishing strategic goals and objectives of the unit, division,

department, and the County. It begins on an employee’s first day on the job. The communication process

involves the supervisor and employee working together to clarify expectations, set objectives, identify goals,

provide feedback and coaching, and evaluate results. Performance management helps to focus employees on

contributing directly to the strategic priorities of the County as well as to their personal growth and

development. When it is effective it is a key process to regularly let employees know that their contributions

are recognized and appreciated.

An effective performance management process also ensures that both the County and its employees are

protected against illegal discrimination through proper notification, documentation, and supportive

communication if/when problems arise.

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San Mateo County Collaborative Performance Management System Guide | Performance Management Cycle 4

Progressive

Discipline

Performance Planning &

Goal Setting

Performance Feedback &

Coaching

Performance Review & Evaluation

PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT CYCLE

Managing performance and providing feedback and coaching is not an isolated event that takes place just

during an annual performance evaluation. The performance management process is an annual cycle with

informal and formal one-on-one discussions held throughout the year to provide feedback, work through

issues, and modify goals if needed. Receiving ongoing feedback and coaching is how employees understand

how they contribute to the organization and how they can learn to continuously increase the value of that

contribution. Providing ongoing, value-added feedback, and coaching is a key part of performance

management.

Ongoing: Coaching & Mentoring

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San Mateo County Collaborative Performance Management System Guide | Performance Management Roles and Responsibilities 5

PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

The successful performance of the County of San Mateo as an organization is made possible by organizational

alignment. When employees are clear about the direction and priorities of their units and departments they

can see how their efforts contribute to the achievement of the overall County goals. As a result, the County

organization can move more quickly and effectively toward successful achievement of its top priorities. All

employees need concrete goals to focus on along with an understanding of what is expected of them. When

managers and supervisors communicate clear expectations to their employees, and provide on-going feedback

and coaching, it helps to ensure employees’ success.

Effective performance management involves the alignment of the following roles:

The County

•The County, under the leadership of the Board of Supervisors and the County Manager, sets the Mission, Vision, and Strategic Priorities for departments to follow in order to support a sustainable San Mateo County.

Departments

•Departments use the Outcome-Based Management (OBM) process to set goals, outcomes and strategies to support and align with the County’s Strategic Priorities. Many of the departmental priorities also incorporate community goals. Departments establish performance standards and expectations for their respective divisions, programs, functions and job classifications.

The Supervisor

•The Supervisor sets unit goals and objectives to support the department/division’s priorities. Supervisors also establish specific performance standards and expectations for the job classifications assigned to their unit. They then work with the employees who report to them to understand how the County’s Performance Factors relate to their jobs and to set their specific performance and development goals and objectives.

Employee

•Each County employee works with his or her supervisor to understand the performance expectations for his or her position and to set specific performance and development goals. Employees are empowered to manage their action plans to accomplish their goals and to monitor and communicate the results. Employees will receive ongoing feedback and coaching in order to let them know how they're doing, and to ensure they are working as effectively as possible.

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San Mateo County Collaborative Performance Management System Guide | Performance Planning and Goal Setting 6

PERFORMANCE PLANNING AND GOAL SETTING

Performance Planning and Goal Setting occurs at the beginning of the Performance Management Cycle, which

is the beginning of the fiscal year (July 1). Performance Planning serves as the foundation for the Performance

Management Cycle and includes setting clear goals to be accomplished during the year along with clarifying

the performance factors that are most important for job success. Discussing and agreeing to priorities and

expectations at the beginning of the evaluation period provides a clear, consistent structure and plan for

monitoring and evaluating performance. This plan serve as a point of reference throughout the process, and

may be modified as needed. The plan can be documented and monitered in the County’s Learning

Management System (LMS) Performance Management Module. The time spent clarifying priorities and

expectations at the outset of the process ensures an understanding that allows both supervisor and employee

to move forward with confidence and clarity.

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San Mateo County Collaborative Performance Management System Guide | Performance Planning and Goal Setting 7

PREPARATION - DOCUMENTS TO REVIEW

The following should be reviewed prior to conducting the Performance Planning and Goal Setting meeting:

•Review past goals and/or objectives and employee’s performance. Did he or she accomplish them successfully? If not, why?

•Are the performance goals and/or objectives and expectations still meaningful? Are they related to the position description, work plan, department priorities, or the department’s issues?

•Are they ongoing or have they been completed?

Previous year’s Performance

Plan

•Has the employee’s job changed? Are there job functions or responsibilities that could or should be added or eliminated?

•Should an updated classification specification be developed? (If so, contact the Human Resources Department.)

Employee’s Classification Specification

•What are the department’s goals and priorities and how does the employee support them?

Departmental outcomes for

the upcoming FY

•What are the program and/or unit goals and priorities and how does the employee support them?

•Consider the contributions the work unit and the employee are expected to make.

Unit or group level goals

•How does each of the Performance Factors apply to the individual expectations for the employee?

•Which areas should be emphasized and clarified?

Performance Factors

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San Mateo County Collaborative Performance Management System Guide | Performance Planning and Goal Setting 8

CONDUCTING THE PERFORMANCE PLANNING SESSION

Establishing performance goals and expectations is a collaborative process between the supervisor and the

employee. Schedule sufficient time; along with a location that is convenient for both of you and conducive to

dialog. (See the “Performance Planning How-To Guide.”)

PERFORMANCE FACTORS AND CLASSIFICATION SPECIFICATION

At the planning session, the specific role that the individual employee plays within his or her functional area

and job classification should be discussed. The supervisor and employee should work together to determine

what competencies and levels of proficiency and performance are essential for success. The job description

along with each performance factor and the specific standards, expectations and competencies associated

with each one, should be reviewed with the employee so that he or she understands how they apply in

achieving successful performance in his or her position. (See the Performance Factor Decscriptions and

“Performance Factor How-To Guide.”)

Consider the following:

• What function does the position need to

perform and why?

• What tasks and results is the employee

accountable for?

• How can you help the employee

accomplish these tasks and results?

• How will you and the employee work to

overcome any barriers?

• How will you and the employee

communicate during the year about job

tasks to prevent problems and keep

current?

• What level of authority or discretion

does the employee have with respect to

job tasks?

• Individual Contribution

• Professionalism

• Problem Solving and Judgment

• Interpersonal Skills

• Job Specific Contribution

• Managing Employee Performance (for Managers and Supervisors

The Performance Factors include:

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San Mateo County Collaborative Performance Management System Guide | Performance Planning and Goal Setting 9

GOAL SETTING

There are two categories of goals that should be established for every employee during the Performance

Planning and Goal Setting phase – Performance Goals and Development Goals. Each year the County and the

various departments set strategic goals that are meant to cascade to all parts of the organization. Cascading

goals means breaking down the higher-level organizational goals into a series of smaller goals that describe

what each department, program or unit needs to achieve. These goals are then broken down further so each

individual in the unit has his or her own performance goals. In this way, progress throughout the organization

is aligned and measurable. The LMS performance management module enables managers and supervisors to

specify the relevant higher-level goals to which individual goals are to be aligned.

Successful goal-setting entails everyone knowing what they need to do, understanding why it is important,

and being clear about what results are expected.

Performance Goals

• Performance Goals are appropriate to the level of position and are directly related to the major components, key job responsibilities, tasks, deliverables and associated activities. Individual performance goals should be linked to unit, program, department and County goals where possible. Some goals may be ongoing and reflect expectations that are important for this position year after year. Other goals may be time-limited, such as special projects occurring in a given year.

• In setting Performance Goals, consider the following:

• What are the employee’s major responsibilities for the year?

• What result and/or accomplishment do you want the employee to attain?

• How will you know whether the employee is succeeding?

Development Goals

• Development Goals are training, professional growth or other learning-oriented goals that support an increase in an employee’s knowledge, skill and/or ability to excel in their current job performance and improve their career prospects.

• In setting Development Goals, consider the following:

• Which skill areas will most impact the employee’s ability to help the unit, program, department or County succeed?

• What does the employee need to develop (i.e. new skills/abilities) to achieve their results?

• What areas could the employee develop in order to grow and be better prepared to accept new and/or expanded responsibilities?

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San Mateo County Collaborative Performance Management System Guide | Performance Planning and Goal Setting 10

PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT GOALS

There is another category of goals that support the improvement of an employee’s performance up to an

acceptable or competent level. These goals are Performance Improvement Goals and would be part of a

“special review” and incorporated in a Performance Improvement Plan that is consistent with current

Employee Relations policy.

SMART GOALS

All goals, whether performance or development goals, should be set using the SMART method. The objective

is to create clear goals that are measurable, easy to understand, and linked to specific observable behaviors,

actions and results. When a goal is clear, specific, and results-oriented with a definite time set for completion,

employees and supervisors can more easily agree on what successful performance looks like, thus reducing

misunderstandings or surprises during the performance management cycle. This also makes it easier to

monitor and support progress along the way. Both the supervisor and the employee know what's expected,

and the specific results can be a source of future motivation. (See a “Guide to Setting SMART Goals.”)

• SpecificS

• MeasurableM

• AchievableA

• RelevantR

• Time-SensitiveT

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San Mateo County Collaborative Performance Management System Guide | Performance Planning and Goal Setting 11

Here are some questions to consider in following the SMART Goal Setting method:

• What will be accomplished?

• What are you going to do? What action(s) will you take?

Specific

• How will the goal be measured?

• How much? How many? How well?

• How will you gather and track the information (evidence) to measure progress and achievement?

• What will be the result when this goal is achieved?

Measurable

• Is this goal do-able? What tools/resources are needed?

• Do you have all the necessary skills and capabilities or do you need training or other assistance?

• How much of a stretch is this goal?

Achievable

• Why have you selected the goal? What is the purpose? Why is it important?

• Is this goal relevant to the job/unit/department/County mission and goals?

• Will the results of achieving this goal help the organization and/or residents?

• Does the goal support professional growth and development?

Relevant

• When are you going to take action?

• What is the time frame or deadline for achieving this goal?

Time-Sensitive

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San Mateo County Collaborative Performance Management System Guide | Performance Planning and Goal Setting 12

At the conclusion of the Performance Planning and Goal Setting the following objectives should be met:

The employee has a thorough understanding of the work

involved – the critical functions, key job responsibilities, tasks,

deliverables and activities.

Both the supervisor and the employee have reviewed the job

description to ensure that information is accurate and up to

date.

The employee understands what constitutes “successful

performance” and how the performance factors relate to his or

her specific job.

The employee is aware how the results of his or her efforts will contribute to achieving County,

department, division, program, and/or unit goals and objectives.

The employee understands how he or she can manage and improve his or her own professional growth

and development and the supervisor understands his or her role in supporting this development.

Both the supervisor and the employee know what information, resources, tools, training and

supervision is needed to enable the employee’s success.

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San Mateo County Collaborative Performance Management System Guide | /Performance Feedback and Coaching 13

PERFORMANCE FEEDBACK AND COACHING

Providing Performance Feedback and Coaching are two critical skills needed by 21st century managers and

supervisors. In our current work environments where conditions change quickly, employees need to

continuously learn. Success requires that we all have ways of measuring how we are doing, of reinforcing

successful performance, and of correcting where improvement is needed.

Performance Feedback and Coaching is an ongoing process to track, reinforce and adjust performance

execution and promote professional growth that involves observing, documenting and providing feedback,

direction, instruction, and training.

Ongoing informal reviews allow time to make course corrections that may be required due to shifting

priorities or changes in performance (improvement or decline). These reviews could take place as part of a

one-on-one meeting. The objective is for supervisors to support and encourage employees and address any

challenges they may be encountering. Ongoing feedback provides employees with opportunities to

understand how they are doing, feel valued for their performance and contributions (recognition), and learn

ways to improve their performance (development).

Interim progress meetings should be conducted and documented to review and discuss the employee’s

progress toward meeting his or her goals and to consider any developmental needs or performance

improvement required. Supervisors should plan two such interim progress meetings during the course of the

annual performance cycle (roughly every four months.) The employee should complete an Interim Status

Update and submit it to his or her supervisor for review prior to the interim progress meeting. Any changes or

updates to the performance and/or development goals can also be recorded at the conclusion of the meeting.

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San Mateo County Collaborative Performance Management System Guide | /Performance Feedback and Coaching 14

“He should know

better. I shouldn’t

have to tell him.”

“I don’t want to

hurt her feelings.” “If I tell him, he

won’t like me.”

“He’s not going to

change no matter

what I say.” “She’ll go ballistic

if I mention this.”

OBSERVATION

Management By Walking Around (MBWA) is a way to build relationships and be in a better position to

understand who your employees are and what is going on with each person’s performance. Watch and listen

and you will have a better idea of how to work with them and help them stay motivated. It works best if you

practice it regularly.

DOCUMENTATION

The LMS includes a feature called “My Team” which can be used to record meeting notes and observations

and to save documents related to the employee’s performance and behavior. Supervisors should record any

significant events that resulted in giving constructive feedback (positive and negative). Make sure that all

notes have been verbally communicated to that person. This documentation will be useful when conducting

interim reviews and completing the formal performance evaluation at the end of the cycle. Use other tracking

tools like a significant events list.

PROVIDING FEEDBACK

The purpose of feedback is to encourage effective future behavior. Feedback should add value to the

employee’s understanding of what he or she is doing well and how performance can be improved. The focus is

not on correcting the past, because we can’t alter what happened. The focus is on highlighting past behavior

to communicate what actions should continue (positive) or change (negative) in order to perform more

effectively in the future.

Supervisors are often fearful of delivering negative feedback. Some common excuses are:

Experience shows that when delivered regularly, effectively and with positive intent, there is typically less

discomfort after sharing the truth and being constructive. Delivering both positive and negative feedback is

not always easy. However it is the responsibility of supervisors and is an important part of being a professional

within the organization.

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San Mateo County Collaborative Performance Management System Guide | /Performance Feedback and Coaching 15

VALUE-ADDED FEEDBACK

Value-added feedback is information-specific, issue-focused, and based on observations. There is a difference

between value-added feedback and praise and criticism. Praise and criticism can be personal judgments that

are general and based on subjective opinions and feelings.

Value-added feedback is most valuable when it is constructive (both positive and negative), specific and

timely. Value-added feedback should cover both work performance and output as well as observed job-

related behavior.

• Be clear, straightforward and get to the point.

• Be sincere and show that you care. Mean what you say and avoid giving mixed messages.

• In positive situations– express gratitude and appreciation.

• In negative situations – express concern in both your language and tone.

• Give the feedback in-person, not through the use of technology.

Guidelines to keep in mind:

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San Mateo County Collaborative Performance Management System Guide | /Performance Feedback and Coaching 16

MODEL FOR GIVING VALUE-ADDED FEEDBACK

STEP 1. – ASK IF THE TIME IS RIGHT

Since value-added feedback is about encouraging another

person’s behavior, it is not worth taking the time to deliver it

(positive or negative) if the other person is not ready to hear it.

It is important to pause and wait for the employee’s response. If

the employee says no, you should find another time to go back

and ask again. However, if you determine that the behavior

represents a performance problem that needs to be corrected

immediately, choose a time when your emotions are under

control and you are prepared to discuss the consequences if the

performance problem does not improve. Follow the County’s

Employee Relations guidelines.

STEP 2. – STATE THE BEHAVIOR

Behavior takes the following forms:

Verbal communication (the words we

say and how we say them)

Non-verbal communication (facial

expressions and body language)

Work product (quality, completeness and

accuracy)

Before providing feedback, identify and note the specific

behavior that you observed, considering these forms. When

delivering negative feedback, don’t discuss “attitude.” Describe

what you observed. Even though we may feel we are

experiencing someone’s attitude, it is in fact a conclusion or

judgment we make after observing his or her behavior. If the

feedback is about characterizing attitude it will likely generate

defensiveness and can be interpreted as a personal attack, which

should not be the purpose of feedback.

Here are some questions to ask:

“Can I share something with you?”

“Can I give you some feedback?”

“Can I talk about something that just

happened?”

This step begins with a statement

that describes the specific behavior:

“When you…”

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San Mateo County Collaborative Performance Management System Guide | /Performance Feedback and Coaching 17

STEP 3. - STATE THE IMPACT

This step involves describing the effect of the

behavior you described in Step 2 on you and/or

others. These could be consequences,

conclusions, results, etc. You can also describe

what the desired results or behavior is if that is

not clear to the employee.

Be clear, straightforward and get to the point.

STEP 4. – PAUSE

Allow time for the person to offer additional information and/or a solution. This is typically useful when

feedback is negative.

STEP 5. – ASK FOR ALTERNATIVES OR CHANGE

In many cases employees will know what has to

change, or continue, after you complete Step 3

(State the Impact). In those circ*mstances it is not

necessary to go to Step 5 (Ask for Change). Validate

their solution and move on.

Ask meaningful, open-ended questions to guide the

employee toward understanding what behavior he

or she needs to change and how to go about it.

STEP 6. – OFFER SUPPORT

Ask the employee what specific support and/or direction he or she may need from you to change his or her

behavior. If the employee doesn’t present an acceptable solution, work collaboratively to develop one to

achieve the desired outcome.

This step begins with a statement that clearly

describes the impact:

“It causes this…”

“Here’s what happens…”

“I have to…”

“It makes me feel…”

“The benefit is…”

However, if change is required, and the employee

doesn’t present an acceptable solution on his or

her own, ask a form of the following questions:

“How can you do that differently?”

“What would be a more effective way of handling

that situation?”

“What ideas do you have for improving your

performance in this area?”

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VALUE-ADDED FEEDBACK

Supervisors who take a strength-based approach help employees identify strengths and align their talents with

their work. These supervisors don't ignore employee weaknesses, but fixing them isn't their only focus.

Instead, supervisors should focus more on catching their employees doing things right than on doing things

that are incorrect, or not quite right. Don't wait for the big successes. Celebrate the small ones too. It is more

effective to have employees be aware of what they are good at and how their strengths can be leveraged to

the benefit of the team and organization.

Ideally, feedback will be short and specific, without skipping any of the steps described above. It is most

important that all feedback be delivered sincerely with the focus on the individual. Negative feedback doesn’t

have to have an edge. It can be delivered quickly and casually and still achieve the desired effect. By being

more regular and routine, feedback, especially negative feedback, will be easier to deliver and easier to

receive because it will feel less awkward or painful.

DEALING WITH PUSH BACK

If the employee argues or acts defensive after you deliver feedback, close out the conversation quickly and

walk away. Since the purpose of feedback is to encourage effective future behavior, it is not useful to argue.

As the supervisor you still have the ability to manage performance. However, in this case, it is better to avoid

conflict and instead follow-up later if you are still not getting the desired performance results.

Example of Value-Added Negative Feedback

• “Hey John can I give you some feedback? When you’re late turning in your daily reports it affects our ability to stay on schedule. What can you do differently? Is there anything I can do to help?”

• “Mary, can I give you some feedback? When you interrupt people in staff meetings it makes me feel like you are not really interested in what other people are saying.”

Example of Value-Added Positive Feedback

• “Joan, can I give you some feedback? When you took care of that client issue that Bob e-mailed to me, it freed me up to attend that training. Thanks for doing that.”

• “Sam can I give you some feedback? What you said in that meeting about lead time really made sense. You really helped to make it productive. I just wanted you to know that.”

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San Mateo County Collaborative Performance Management System Guide | /Performance Feedback and Coaching 19

COACHING APPROACH

Effective coaching is informal in nature and involves building and maintaining a trusting relationship. When

the supervisor stays connected to his or her employees, he or she can work collaboratively with them to share

information about work progress, potential barriers and problems, possible solutions to problems, and how

the supervisor can help the employee to learn and succeed. Scheduled one-on-one meetings are typically a

good time to work on issues in a focused, uninterrupted way.

Coaching should occur on a regular basis throughout the year and may be initiated by either the supervisor or

the employee. The supervisor (and the employee) should document these discussions, if appropriate, to

reinforce what is being shared as well as to record agreed upon plans. This documentation can also be used at

the end of the performance cycle to provide specific example of progress and accomplishment as part of the

performance review and evaluation.

Coaching includes a variety of activities, such as:

•Observing performance (MBWA)

•Providing instruction and examples

•Jointly solving problems

•Delegating meaningful assignments

•Guiding employee’s efforts

•Asking open-ended questions

•Providing encouragement

•Correcting poor performance

•Recognizing excellent performance

•Listening to employee concerns and ideas

•Removing barriers to performance

The following questions should be considered as you plan your coaching meeting:

•What is the purpose and objectives?

•What do you need to do, or have, to be prepared?

•What does your employee need to do, or have, to be prepared?

•What can you do to encourage dialogue and participation?

•How are things going with respect to job responsibilities?

•What is going well?

•What is not going so well?

•Is the employee on track toward achieving goals or objectives and meeting performance standards?

•If things are not on track, what needs to change to get things on track?

•How can you lend a hand to support improvement (even if everything is on track)?

•Has anything changed that might affect the employee’s job tasks, goals, objectives or priorities?

•If so, what changes should be made to the employee’s job tasks and goals or objectives?

•What are potential follow-up actions?

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PERFORMANCE ISSUES

During the annual performance cycle it may become clear that performance does not meet expectations.

When training and coaching efforts have not resulted in the desired change of behavior necessary for

satisfactory job performance, the supervisor must address it by developing a Performance Improvement Plan

(PIP). In such instances, supervisors should consult with the Human Resources Department for assistance.

Here are general guidelines to keep in mind when coaching an employee:

• Allow sufficient time for coaching. Even on informal basis, it takes time to do it well.

• Don’t be distracted by interruptions.

• Keep in mind the employee’s preferred communication style (i.e. direct, indirect, etc.).

• Ask how you can be of help to the employee.

• Solicit ideas and suggestions from the employee for improving work processes.

• Work with the employee to remove barriers to success and identify strategies to minimize barriers.

• Don’t assume the employee knows what you are thinking.

• Discuss the employee’s learning and professional development needs.

• Solicit employee feedback on coaching effectiveness.

• Write down what you and the employee each agree to do.

• Talk about follow up. Will you meet again to discuss any issues? When?

• Provide ongoing performance feedback to prevent problems from arising and to recognize positive performance.

• Don’t end on a threatening or negative note. Re-state your support and willingness to help the employee be successful.

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San Mateo County Collaborative Performance Management System Guide | Performance Review and Evaluation 21

PERFORMANCE REVIEW AND EVALUATION

The purpose of the formal Performance Review and Evaluation phase is to ensure open communication and

clear understanding of expectations between the supervisor and employee. Supervisors are expected to

regularly communicate informally during the year through scheduled one-on-one meetings and by on-the-spot

discussion regarding the status of a particular project or assignment. The formal process at this stage should

reflect prior feedback and discussion and be a summation of what has or hasn’t occurred over the course of

the review period. When effective performance planning occurs in the beginning, and is followed by timely

and effective feedback and coaching throughout the cycle, there should be no surprises for the employee

when it comes time to complete the cycle with this phase. Reviewing and evaluating an employee's

performance provides a basis to recognize his or her accomplishment and support and develop his or her

ability to meet individual and organizational needs.

TIMING

Performance Reviews and Evaluations are to be completed annually in May.

Probationary employees are to be evaluated at least once during their

probationary period. This typically occurs 30 days prior to the end of their

probationary period.

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San Mateo County Collaborative Performance Management System Guide | Performance Review and Evaluation 22

• Review significant-events list, calendars, notes and other documentation that will help you remember all of the employee’s relevant performance, not just the last couple of months.

WHAT’S INVOLVED IN THIS PROCESS?

1. Supervisor Preparation

2. Employee Self-Review

3. Performance Review and Evaluation Meeting

4. Completion of Performance Evaluation Form

5. Finalization/Approvals of Performance Evaluation

6. Establishing Timeline for new cycle of Performance Planning and Goal

Setting

1. SUPERVISOR PREPARATION

• Give the employee at least two weeks’ notice before the

Performance Review and Evaluation Meeting.

• Ask the employee to come to the meeting prepared for the

discussion with his or her own work product examples and list of

achievements, related to his or her specific performance and

development goals and performance factors, along with ideas for

areas he or she would like to develop.

• Check to see that the employee is completing a Self-Review prior

to the meeting.

• Schedule a private time and space for the meeting

• Be sure to allow for at least a one-hour meeting with the employee.

• Organize your examples of the employee’s progress.

• Go over past performance information. Review significant-events list, calendars, notes, interim

reviews, and other documentation that will help you remember all of the employee’s relevant

performance, not just the last couple of months.

• Review and determine how well an employee is performing in terms of his or her assigned tasks

and expectations.

• Gather input from others associated with the work of the employee – peers, customers, etc.

• Identify the strengths and weaknesses of the employee in observable behavioral terms (not

attitudes) and clearly designate areas where improvement is required.

• Review the employee’s Self-Review.

• Prepare a draft performance evaluation with initial ratings for the employee’s goals and

performance factors for discussion with the employee during the Performance Review and

Evaluation meeting.

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San Mateo County Collaborative Performance Management System Guide | Performance Review and Evaluation 23

• This meeting should be a dialogue…not a monologue.

• Focus on Development & Coaching

2. EMPLOYEE SELF-REVIEW

• The Employee Self-Review gives the employee an opportunity to respond to a series of questions

designed to help him or her evaluate his or her performance during the Performance Review and

Evaluation period and identify areas for future support and growth. This self-review informs the

conversation between an employee and the supervisor during the Performance Review and

Evaluation meeting.

3. PERFORMANCE REVIEW AND EVALUATION MEETING

STARTING THE MEETING

• Put the employee at ease. Move to a table or sit in a chair next to

the employee. Do not sit behind a table or desk.

• Start the meeting by talking about the purpose and benefits of the Performance Management

process and how this review is a good opportunity for both of you to discuss successes and

positive events from the prior year, areas for improvement, and to plan for next year.

• Ask the employee for input first. Discuss the Self-Review and encourage participation. This

meeting should be a dialogue, not a monologue.

DISCUSS PERFORMANCE AND DEVELOPMENT GOALS

• Review goals and discuss accomplishments and strengths first.

• Discuss the specific extent to which the results for each goal met expectations.

• Ask if the employee has any questions or has anything to add (i.e. information, reactions, etc.)

DISCUSS PERFORMANCE FACTORS

• Review each Performance Factor and your assessment of each.

• Restate the expectations from the beginning of the cycle and provide examples of the employee’s

performance and to what extent performance exceeded, met, or did not meet expectations.

• Ask if the employee has any questions or has anything to add (i.e. information, reactions, etc.)

LISTEN ACTIVELY

• Allow the employee to speak freely before responding to his or

her comments.

• Ask questions to gain understanding.

• Ask the employee for suggestions on what he or she might do

differently the next time.

• Discuss areas for improvement in a way that shows the

employee where changes should be made to meet expectations or could be made to achieve even

greater results.

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San Mateo County Collaborative Performance Management System Guide | Performance Review and Evaluation 24

• End on a positive note!

• Add comments to support your rating decision

• Note meaningful examples of performance

• Ask the employee what he or she could start doing, stop doing and continue doing to improve or

maintain his or her performance.

• Focus on development and coach the employee on how improvements can be made.

• Keep the discussion positive and future-oriented to the extent possible.

ENDING THE MEETING

• Summarize your discussion, including agreements regarding

any changes to ratings or next steps, and reasons for the overall

rating.

• If appropriate, encourage the employee to take steps to

improve job performance.

• Ask the employee for final thoughts and reactions.

• Explain the next steps in finalizing the evaluation.

• Thank the employee for participation during the process.

• End on a positive note, stressing the employee’s overall contribution to the

unit/department/County.

4. COMPLETION OF PERFORMANCE EVALUATION FORM

After the Performance Review and Evaluation meeting, review your notes and consider the discussion and the

comments made by the employee.

Complete the following steps:

1. Review, revise and finalize the ratings in each section based upon the

discussion with the employee.

2. Add comments or narrative in each section to support the rating

decision. The purpose of comments is to explain and justify the rating

as well as to communicate to the employee how he or she can

maintain or improve the rating on a particular performance factor or

goal.

3. Comments should focus on facts, which are events, behaviors or results. Note examples of

performance, both positive and negative, including the context in which they occurred, the behavior

(what they did or didn’t do), and the outcome or consequence.

4. Indicate the date of the Performance Review and Evaluation meeting on the form.

5. Submit the completed form to your manager for review.

6. Any employee receiving a “needs improvement” on any performance factor will have a developmental

objective identified and/or be placed on a Performance Improvement Plan in accordance with current

Employee Relations procedures.

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San Mateo County Collaborative Performance Management System Guide | Performance Review and Evaluation 25

RATING LEVELS

The following rating levels are to be used for evaluating the employee’s overall performance:

Performance and Development Goals:

• Exceptional: Results exceeded all expectations regarding this goal.

• Exceeded Expectations: Results exceeded most expectations regarding this goal.

• Fully Achieved: Results met all expectations regarding this goal.

• Partially Achieved: Results met some, but not all, expectations regarding this goal.

• Did Not Achieve Results: Results did not meet expectations regarding this goal.

• Inactive:Goal was determined to be no longer relevant or appropriate during review period.

Performance Factors:

• Exceptional: Performance in this area exceeded all standards, expectations and objectives and was consistently at an extraordinary level. Contributions to the department and/or the County organization were exceptional during this cycle and reflect a rare level of performance.

• Exceeds Expectations: Performance in this area exceeded most standards, expectations, objectives and desired results.

• Competent and Effective: Performance in this area met all standards, expectations, and objectives. Desired results were at the expected level.

• Needs Improvement: Met some, but not all standards, expectations and objectives in this area and/or performance was inconsistent and below the expected level. Improvement is needed in one or more important areas.

• Unsatisfactory: Did not meet most standards, expectations and objectives in this area and/or did not demonstrate performance at the expected level. Significant improvement is needed in one or more important areas.

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San Mateo County Collaborative Performance Management System Guide | Performance Review and Evaluation 26

OVERALL RATING

The following rating levels are to be used for evaluating the employee’s overall performance:

• Overall performance far exceeded expectations due to exceptionally high quality of work performed in all essential areas of responsibility, resulting in an overall quality of work that was superior; and either 1) included the completion of a major goal or project, or 2) made an exceptional or unique contribution in support of unit, department, or County objectives. This rating is achievable by any employee though given infrequently.

Exceptional

• Overall performance consistently exceeded expectations in all essential areas of responsibility, and the quality of work overall was excellent. Annual goals were met.

Exceeds Expectations

• Overall performance consistently met expectations in all essential areas of responsibility, at times possibly exceeding expectations, and the quality of work overall was very good. The most critical annual goals were met.

Competent and Effective

• Overall performance did not consistently meet expectations – performance failed to meet expectations in one or more essential areas of responsibility, and/or one or more of the most critical goals were not met. A Performance Improvement Plan (PIP), including timelines, will be outlined and monitored to measure progress.

Needs Improvement

• Overall performance was consistently below expectations in most essential areas of responsibility, and/or reasonable progress toward critical goals was not made. Significant improvement is needed in one or more important areas. A Performance Improvement Plan (PIP), including timelines, will be outlined and monitored to measure progress.

Unsatisfactory

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San Mateo County Collaborative Performance Management System Guide | Performance Review and Evaluation 27

Suggested Guidelines for Rating:

An “Exceptional” rating should be used sparingly and only to acknowledge truly exceptional

performance. Employee performance rated at this level stands as a model for other staff and

represents such a unique and exemplary accomplishment and contribution to the organization that it

typically occurs among only a small number of employees.

A rating should not be based on a few isolated performance incidents. When this is done, the rating is

unfairly influenced by non-typical instances of favorable or unfavorable performances. Consider the

entire evaluation period.

Avoid the "Halo" Effect which occurs when one factor influences ratings on all factors.

Avoid judgments made purely on the basis of personality traits.

5. FINALIZATION/APPROVALS OF PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

The indirect manager is accountable for the performance reviews conducted by the

supervisors in his or her unit. The indirect manager will review nearly completed

performance evaluations and discuss any comments or questions with the supervisor.

Once the evaluation has been finalized, the indirect manager will approve it and it will be

sent to the employee.

When the employee receives the approved performance evaluation he or she will have

the opportunity to add comments, including any disagreements, before signing.

The supervisor will send a copy of the completed and signed performance evaluation to

the employee; keep one in the supervisor file. In addition, a copy will be sent to HR for

filing in the civil service/personnel file.

Employee’s

Copy

Supervisor’s

Copy

HR Copy

for Personnel

File

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San Mateo County Collaborative Performance Management System Guide | TOOLS AND RESOURCES 28

TOOLS AND RESOURCES

Employees and supervisors have many tools at their disposal to support their use of the Collaborative

Performance Management System including the LMS performance management module and other online

resources.

LMS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT MODULE

The LMS performance management module provides an easy-to-use tool to:

Notify the employee and supervisor of CPMS deadlines and facilitate communication about roles and

responsibilities

Document the goals and performance factors agreed to during performance planning

Align individual goals to higher-level goals for the work unit, department or County

Create action plans (specific tasks with dates) to support the accomplishment of each goal

Report and track progress on action plans and results

Capture performance feedback from coaching discussions between the employee and supervisor to

help make interim progress reviews and year-end evaluations more constructive and meaningful

Develop and finalize the performance evaluation

Find helpful resources, such as videos and “how-to” guides

OTHER ONLINE RESOURCES

The following helpful online resources can also be found on the LMS “Resources Tab” and on the HR CPMS

Intranet page:

Performance Planning “How-To” Guide

Performance Factor “How-To” Guide

Performance Factor List and Descriptions

SMART Goal-Setting “How-To” Guide

Individual Performance Plan Template (for

temporary use until LMS performance

planning module is available)

Performance Review “How-To” Guide

Employee Self-Review Form

Frequently Asked Questions

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EXISTINGEVALUATIONFORMS

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Attachment B to Employee Performance Evaluation

EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE EVALUATION Self-Evaluation Form

Employee Name (Last, First, MI): Job Title: Dept: Division:

Accomplishments, Goals and Objectives met in the previous year

ACCOMPLISHMENTS, GOALS AND OBJECTIVES MET SINCE THE LAST PERFORMANCE EVALUATION (Accomplishments are projects, programs or defined tasks that have been completed successfully. Goals and Objectives are personal and professional developmental aspirations that increase your job performance or enhance your current skill set that have been completed successfully.) Add additional page(s) if necessary.1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

GOALS AND OBJECTIVES (Describe your goals and objectives for the next evaluation period.) Add additional page(s) if necessary. 1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Please rate yourself from 1 to 5 on the following evaluation factors (5 being highest performing):

Additional Comments: Enter Text here

Quantity of work produced Planning and prioritization Quality of work produced Leadership Knowledge of job Decision making Ability to work independently Public Contact (if applicable) Adherence to attendance policy Oral Expression Acceptance of responsibility Written Expression Working relationships Supervision (if applicable)

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City of San Pablo Performance Evaluation Report

Last Name, First Name, Initial: Type of Appraisal:(Check one)

Action: (Check any applicable)

Department:

3 month-Probationary 6 month-Probationary

Retention/Permanent Status Rejection During Probation

Class Title/ Position: 1 year-Probationary Annual

Extension of Probation Step Increase

Rating Period (Beginning/ Ending): Special Withhold Step Increase

Eva

luat

ion

By:

PRINT NAME _______________________________________________________ TITLE__________________________________ SIGNATURE _______________________________________________________ DATE _________________________________

Div

isio

n M

anag

er

PRINT NAME _______________________________________________________ TITLE__________________________________ SIGNATURE _______________________________________________________ DATE _________________________________ COMMENTS:

Dep

artm

ent

Hea

d

PRINT NAME ________________________________________ SIGNATURE_________________________________________ DATE_______________________________________________

City

Man

ager

SIGNATURE_______________________________________ DATE____________________________________________

Em

ploy

ee

PRINT NAME _______________________________________________________ SIGNATURE _______________________________________________________ DATE _________________________________ COMMENTS:

ORIGINAL – Personnel COPIES (3) - EMPLOYEE, SUPERVISOR, AND EMPLOYEE'S DEPARTMENT PERSONNEL FILE

PERFORMANCE RATINGS: All ratings must be justified and explained in the next section of the evaluation.

Outstanding: Work performance is of high excellence marked by unique and extraordinary accomplishments. Demonstrates a high degree of expertise and mastery in all aspects of the position

Above Average: Work performance exceeds the normal job performance or standard expectations. Performance is clearly and consistently about what is required of the employee. Fully performs the entire range of duties in a professional manner.

Satisfactory: Work performance meets standard expectations of the position. Employee performs essential duties satisfactorily.

Improvement Needed: Work performance is below standards required for this position. Improvement is necessary.

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Unsatisfactory: Work performance is inadequate and definitely inferior to the standards of performance required for this position. Immediate and substantial improvement is necessary. Continued performance at this level may result in disciplinary action.

1. Job Expertise:

Rating: Choose an item. Comments/Areas of Growth:

2. Productivity and Reliability: Number of injuries or accidents during this rating period:

Amount of sick leave used during this rating period:

Rating: Choose an item. Comments/Areas of Growth:

3. Interpersonal Abilities:

Rating: Choose an item. Comments/Areas of Growth:

INSERT TEXT HERE

INSERT TEXT HERE

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4. Adaptability:

Rating: Choose an item. Comments/Areas of Growth:

5. Ethics and Integrity:

Rating: Choose an item. Comments/Areas of Growth:

6. Customer Service:

Rating: Choose an item. Comments/Areas of Growth:

7. Other:

INSERT TEXT HERE

INSERT TEXT HERE

INSERT TEXT HERE

INSERT TEXT HERE

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Rating: Choose an item. Comments/Areas of Growth:

OVERALL COMMENTS:

FUTURE ACTION PLAN TO BE ACHIEVED PRIOR TO NEXT REVIEW:

Mark “X” on appropriate column

INSERT TEXT HERE

INSERT TEXT HERE

INSERT TEXT HERE

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KEY ELEMENTS OF JOB PERFORMANCE

Unsatisfactory Improvement Needed Satisfactory Above

Average Outstanding

Job Expertise

Productivity and Reliability Interpersonal Abilities Adaptability Ethics and Integrity Customer Service Other: OVERALL RATING

DEFINITIONS

Citywide Key Elements of Job Performance

1. Job Expertise Demonstrates knowledge and use of Citywide and departmental procedures/policies Builds and maintains credibility with key stakeholders, internally/externally, by expertly knowing area(s) of related

business (vision, emerging trends, key priorities, financial situation, etc.) Applies technical and procedural know-how to get the job done Serves as a ‘resource person’ on whom others rely for advice Keeps informed of the latest developments in area of specialty and provides accurate information Effectively gathers and uses information, procedures, materials, equipment and techniques, etc. required for job Problem solves effectively and efficiently; evaluates alternatives, and selects the best course of action Ability to effectively use, manipulate, collect and report data on program performance measures, identify

opportunities and measure improvement

2. Productivity and Reliability Productivity levels Attention to detail Ability to prioritize, manage workload, and complete quality work assignments in a timely and efficient manner Arrives to work on time (punctuality) and maintains attendance (for example, no lost time, no patterned or

excessive absences) Meets established schedules and deadlines, including assigned work hours Ability to perform job with minimal instruction Attends to duties of job and follows-up on progress of work Follows instructions and appropriate procedures Fulfills responsibilities and maintains confidentiality as appropriate Takes initiative to identify problems and solutions to workplace challenges Observes rules and regulations, including related safety rules

3. Interpersonal Abilities

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Ability to consistently communicate respectfully and effectively to internal and external customers, coworkers and management (supervisor, managers, executive leadership) to engage others to participate and mitigate conflict

Able to communicate in a clear, professional and concise manner in person, over the phone and in writing Earns the trust and confidence of coworkers and customers through consistent honesty, open communication and

professionalism Uses diplomacy, tact and discretion when dealing with others on emotional or sensitive issues or concerns Seeks and uses feedback from customers, staff, peers and supervisors Demonstrates appropriateness of dress and care in personal appearance Follows chain of command when addressing issues/concerns; follow proper channels in order to resolve

issues/conflicts

4. Adaptability Ability to work with ambiguity and adjust to changing priorities Demonstrates ability to seek and find alternate methods to accomplish tasks or assignments Can work with others with divergent approaches, perspectives, or expertise to develop effective solutions Open minded and willing to embrace new approaches when appropriate and discard approaches that are no

longer working Ability to practice good judgment by identifying and assessing problem(s), quickly, accurately and appropriately in

any given situation Ability to make decisions and resolutions that are accurate, logical, rapid, appropriate, reliable and effective when

made under non-routine conditions 5. Ethics and Integrity

Exhibits transparent, truthful, and ethical conduct that considers impact to the Department, the City, others and

staff Adheres to Code of Ethics, readily discloses potential conflicts of interest, and takes personal responsibility for

mistakes Demonstrates fairness, respect and honesty by making decisions that are objective and reflect just treatment of

others Protects and conserves Department resources against misuse and abuse Demonstrates respect and sensitivity to cultural and other differences when interacting with others Avoids over generalizing and stereotyping and exercises equitable and fair treatment to all Develops and adapts approaches to problems that take into account cultural differences Respects, understands, values and seeks out individual differences to achieve the vision and mission of the

Department Holds self and others accountable for achieving results that embody the principles of diversity and inclusion

6. Customer Service

Demonstrates the ability to anticipate customers’ needs, deliver services, and respond to customers in a timely,

accurate, courteous, respectful and friendly manner Demonstrates ownership, attention to detail, and follow-thru effectively and efficiently Approaches problem-solving by focusing on customers first; advocates for customer results point of view Takes ownership for solving problems, regardless of assigned responsibility Addresses customer complaints/problems in a timely manner

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7. Other (i.e. Safety) 8. Supervisor and Leadership Skills – for managers and supervisors only

Establishes high standards of performance and sets an example for others to follow Offers regular and constructive feedback, provides support and encouragement during staff meetings and regular

one-on-one meetings Sets effective long and short-term goals , establishes realistic priorities and gives clear task instructions Ability to establish disciplinary control as needed while maintaining fairness and impartiality Develops direct reports by proactively encouraging employees to identify skill deficiency, training and/or

opportunities Knows relevant laws, policies and procedures for assignment Ability to consistently make tactically sound decision during stressful situations and emergencies

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MANAGEMENTPERFORMANCEAPPRAISAL

Employee:

Position:

EvaluatingManager:

Department:

DateofEvaluation:

EvaluationPeriod:

Section1:GOALSANDSTANDARDSListeachgoaland/orstandardthatwaspartoftheemployee’sperformanceplanduringthisevaluationperiod.Foreachgoal/standardlisted,selecttheratingthatindicatesthelevelofperformanceachieved.

NFA=Notfullyachieved

Resultswerenotconsistentlyachievedorbelowexpectations.

A=AchievedExpectations

Resultsachievedconsistentlymettheperformanceexpectations.

EX=ExceededExpectations

ONLYmarkwhentangibleevidencecanbeshownthatresultsachievedwereconsistentlygreaterthantheexpectedstandard.

Thenforeachgoal/standard,providenarrativecommentsthatexplaintheratingselected.Describeactualperformanceexamplestohighlighttheresultsthatwereorwerenotachieved.

1. GOAL/STANDARD:

Rating:

Comments:

2. GOAL/STANDARD: Rating:

Comments:

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3. GOAL/STANDARD:

Rating:

Comments:

4. GOAL/STANDARD Rating:

Comments:

5. GOAL/STANDARD:

Rating:

Comments:

6. GOAL/STANDARD Rating:

Comments:

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(Attachadditionalpagestocoverallthegoalsandstandardstobeevaluated.)

Section2:OVERALLRATINGANDCOMMENTSProvidesupportfortheOverallPerformanceRatingselected(NFA,A,EX).Indoingso,summarize

(1) Significantaccomplishmentsand(2) Areasneedingimprovement

Comments:OverallPerformanceRating:

Section3:GROWTHANDDEVELOPMENTIdentifyareasandpossibleactivitiestoenhancetheemployee’sprofessionalgrowthanddevelopmentforthenextreviewperiod.Comments:

Signatures:Employee:_________________________________________________________________________DepartmentHead:__________________________________________________________________EvaluatingManager:________________________________________________________________HumanResources:__________________________________________________________________

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Employee’ssignatureacknowledgestheappraisalhasbeenreadanddiscussedanddoesnotnecessarilysignifyagreement.Theemployeeiswelcometoattachasheetofcommentsinresponsetothereview.

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Part 3: Employee Self-Evaluation Form

Objectives:

Discuss your strongest areas and give specific examples.

Discuss areas needing improvement.

Identify areas for development and potential activities for professional career enhancement. List expected results.

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1

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

EEO CATEGORY: PROFESSIONALS Accountant I/II Administrative Analyst I/II/Sr.* Administrative Officer* Assistant/Associate Planner Assistant to the City Manager Business Development Mgr Civil Engineer I/II/Sr.* Community Relations Mgr. Contract Analyst

Environ. Health Specialist* Financial Analyst/Sr. General Manager, IE* Housing Inspector Housing Operations Specialist Housing Supervisor* Human Resources Analyst/Sr.* Police Records Manager* Purchasing Analyst

Redevelopment Project Mgr/Sr.*

*Safety Awareness applies to position (see page 5).

LAST NAME, FIRST NAME

TITLE

DEPARTMENT

APPRAISAL PERIOD (START/END DATE)

SIGNATURES

Employee signature acknowledges receipt of the Performance Evaluation. The employee has an opportunity to add comments either in Part 2 or by attaching a separate page with comments.

Employee Signature Date

Overall Rating:

Exceeds Expectations Meets Expectations Does Not Fully Meet Expectations

Supervisor Signature ___________________________________ Date (Print name) Department Head Signature ___________________________________ Date (Print name)

Original to Human Resources for filing

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2

INSTRUCTIONS

This form is used by supervisors and employees to plan, monitor, and evaluate performance. General guidelines for completing the Performance Evaluation form are outlined below. New or promoted employees may be evaluated at six months and/or twelve months (see below). If an employee is rated Does Not Fully Meet Expectations, list specific goals for improvement and the date you expect them to be achieved in Part 2.

Consideration for Advancement within Salary Range Following Appointment and/or Promotion (Personnel Rule 13)

6 Months or 12 Months

Performance Evaluation

Salary Increase Consideration 12 Months

Probationary Period Ends (if applicable)

Performance Evaluation Every 12 Months Thereafter

Performance Evaluation

Salary Increase Consideration

Planning The supervisor and employee meet to evaluate the previous year’s performance. The supervisor and employee also review departmental goals and objectives. Establishing clear performance goals and expectations helps avoid “surprises” and conflicts at year-end. With clear goals, the employee and supervisor both know what needs to be accomplished and can monitor the performance throughout the year. Evaluating Prior to meeting for the performance evaluation, two tasks will be accomplished. The employee should complete the Employee Self-Evaluation form (see Part 3 below). The employee lists the achievements and areas needing improvement for the rating period and submits it to the supervisor at least one (1) week prior to the performance evaluation meeting. The supervisor will review the employee’s performance and the Self-Evaluation form. PART 1: PERFORMANCE FACTORS At the end of the appraisal period, the supervisor evaluates the Performance Factors (Part 1) using the Competency Ratings (4, 3 and 2) and adds the rating number in the rating box for the areas of each dimension. The rater also provides narrative comments to substantiate the ratings. The narrative is completed in the comments section of Part 1. PART 2: OTHER ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND COMMENTS Both the supervisor and employee may use this section to document important results achieved during the rating period or to include any comments regarding the review. Employees are encouraged to comment and respond to the review content and process. PART 3: EMPLOYEE SELF-EVALUATION FORM The employee completes Part 3 which includes objectives, strongest areas, areas of improvement, and identifies potential career development activities and expected results. The employee will complete and return part 3 to his/her supervisor one week prior to the scheduled performance evaluation meeting. PART 4: OTHER PERFORMANCE FACTORS (IF APPLIABLE) The supervisor checks the factors which require improvement by the employee being evaluated. A discussion about meeting the expectation(s) should occur between the employee and supervisor.

COVER PAGE: The supervisor completes the cover page and checks an Overall Rating for the Appraisal Period. Upon completion of the Performance Evaluation, the employee, supervisor, and department head sign and date the completed evaluation. A copy of the Performance Evaluation form is given to the employee, a copy is kept for the department’s records, and the original is submitted to the Human Resources Department.

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3

Part 1: Performance Factors

Competency Ratings: 4 Exceeds Expectations

3 Meets Expectations 2 Does Not Fully Meet Expectations

Adaptability Maintaining effectiveness when experiencing major changes in work tasks or the work environment; adjusting effectively to work within new work structures, processes, requirements, or cultures.

Areas: Rating

Tries to understand changes – Actively seeks information about new work situations; strives to understand the rationale and implications for changes in work responsibilities or environment.

Approaches change or newness positively – Treats change and new situations as opportunities for learning or growth; identifies the benefits of change; speaks positively about the change to others.

Adjusts behavior – Quickly modifies behavior to deal effectively with changes in the work environment; tries new approaches appropriate for new or changed situations; does not persist with ineffective behaviors.

Building Strategic Work Relationships Developing and using collaborative relationships to facilitate the accomplishment of work goals.

Areas: Rating

Seeks opportunities – Proactively tries to build effective working relationships with others. Clarifies the current situation – Probes for and provides information to clarify situations. Develops others’ and own ideas – Seeks and expands on original ideas, enhances others’ ideas, and contributes own ideas about the issues at hand.

Facilitates agreement – Gains agreement from partners to support ideas or take partnership-oriented action; uses sound rationale to explain value of actions.

Uses Key Principles – Establishes good interpersonal relationships by helping people feel valued, appreciated, and included in discussions (enhances self-esteem, empathizes, involves, discloses, supports).

Customer Focus (internal and external customers) Ensuring that the customer perspective is a driving force behind business decisions and activities; crafting and implementing service practices that meet customers’ and own organization’s needs.

Areas: Rating

Seeks to understand customer – Actively seeks information to understand customer circ*mstances, problems, expectations, and needs.

Identifies customer service needs – Identifies breakdowns in internal processes and systems that directly impact customer service and retention; expresses concerns to others.

Creates customer-focused practices – Uses understanding of customer need to institute systems, processes, and procedures to ensure customer satisfaction and to prevent service issues from occurring; promotes customer service as a value.

Assures customer satisfaction – Makes sure that customer solutions, practices, and procedures are carried out and achieve their objectives.

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4

Decision Making Identifying and understanding issues, problems, and opportunities; comparing data from different sources to draw conclusions; using effective approaches for choosing a course of action or developing appropriate solutions; taking action that is consistent with available facts, constraints, and probable consequences.

Areas: Rating

Identifies issues, problems, and opportunities – Recognizes issues, problems or opportunities and determines whether action is needed.

Gathers information – Identifies the need for and collects information to better understand issues, problems, and opportunities.

Interprets information – Integrates information from a variety of sources; detects trends, associations, and cause-effect relationships.

Generates alternatives – Creates relevant options for addressing problems / opportunities and achieving desired outcomes.

Chooses appropriate action – Formulates clear decision criteria; evaluates options by considering implications and consequences; chooses an effective option.

Commits to action – Implements decisions or initiates action within a reasonable time. Involves others – Includes others in the decision-making process as warranted to obtain good information, make the most appropriate decisions, and ensure buy-in and understanding of the resulting decisions.

Financial Management Prepares budget requests that reflect planned activities of the project or work unit and lives within the adopted budget.

Areas: Rating

Drafts budget requests that reflect planned activities. Lives within adopted budget.

Formal Presentation (IF APPLICABLE) Presenting ideas effectively to individuals or groups when given time to prepare; delivering presentations suited to the characteristics and needs of the audience.

Areas: Rating

Defines clear goals -Establishes an objective that clearly reflects the needs of the audience. Follows a logical sequence and summarizes the presentation-Presents main ideas and details that support the objective of the presentation, and presents facts, evidence,; delivers information in a logical order to aid understanding. Summarizes the main ideas; calls the audience to take action or make decisions, where appropriate.

Uses nonverbal communication- Uses body language (e.g., eye contact and gestures) that is consistent with verbal communication and aids understanding.

Listens and responds to questions and objections - Involves the audience by soliciting questions and input; clarifies as needed to help achieve the goals of the session.

Maintains audience attention -Keeps the audience engaged through use of techniques such as analogies, illustrations, humor, an appealing style, body language, and voice inflection. Uses learning aids -Uses audio and visual aids to enhance the audience's understanding of content.

Negotiation Effectively exploring alternatives and positions to reach outcomes that gain the support and acceptance of all parties.

Areas: Rating

Clarifies the current situation. Identifies points of agreement/disagreement. Keeps discussion issue oriented. Develops others’ and own ideas. Builds support for preferred alternatives. Facilitates agreement.

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5

Planning and Organizing Establishes courses of action for self and others to ensure that work is completed efficiently.

Areas: Rating

Prioritizes – Identifies more critical and less critical activities and assignments; adjusts priorities when appropriate.

Determines tasks and resources – Determines project / assignment requirements by breaking them down into tasks and identifying types of equipment, materials, and people needed.

Schedules – Allocates appropriate amounts of time for completing own work; avoids scheduling conflicts; develops timelines and milestones.

Leverages resources – Takes advantage of available resources (individuals, processes, departments, and tools) to complete work efficiently; coordinates with internal and external partners.

Stays focused – Uses time efficiently and prevents irrelevant issues or distractions from interfering with work completion.

Safety Awareness (if applicable, see page 1) Identifying and correcting conditions that affect employee safety; upholding safety standards.

Areas: Rating

Identifies safety issues and problems – Detects hazardous working conditions and safety problems; checks equipment and/or work area regularly.

Takes corrective action – Reports or corrects unsafe working conditions; makes recommendations and/or improves safety and security procedures; enforces safety regulations and procedures.

Monitors the corrective action – Monitors safety or security issues after taking corrective action and ensures continued compliance.

Technical/Professional Knowledge Having achieved a satisfactory level of technical and professional skill or knowledge in position-related areas; keeping up with current developments and trends in areas of expertise.

Areas: Rating

Understands technical terminology and developments. Knows how to apply a technical skill or procedure. Knows when to apply a technical skill or procedure. Performs complex tasks in area of expertise.

Work Standards Setting high standards of performance for self and others; assuming responsibility and accountability for successfully completing assignments or tasks; self-imposing standards of excellence rather than having standards imposed.

Areas: Rating

Sets standards of excellence – Establishes criteria and/or work procedures to achieve a high level of quality, productivity, or service.

Ensures high quality – Dedicates required time and energy to assignments or tasks to ensure that no aspect of the work is neglected; works to overcome obstacles to completing tasks or assignments.

Takes responsibility – Accepts responsibility for outcomes (positive or negative) of one’s work; admits mistakes and refocuses efforts when appropriate.

Encourages others to take responsibility – Provides encouragement and support to others in accepting responsibility; does not accept others’ denial of responsibility without questioning.

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6

Comments:

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7

Part 2: Other Accomplishments & Comments

Other Accomplishments and Comments:

Areas for Development:

Supporting/Training Activities:

Development Results/Progress:

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8

Part 3: Employee Self-Evaluation Form

Objectives:

Discuss your strongest areas and give specific examples.

Discuss areas needing improvement.

Identify areas for development and potential activities for professional career enhancement. List expected results.

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9

Part 4: Other Performance Factors (if applicable) The following are general performance factors that may be considered during the performance evaluation. The purpose is to facilitate communication between the supervisor and employee about improving these important aspects of the position. The supervisor should check the factors which require improvement by the employee being evaluated. A discussion about meeting the expectation(s) should occur between the employee and supervisor. During the next performance evaluation, the supervisor should review the factor(s) checked. FACTOR CHECKLIST:

Attendance and Punctuality: Attends work regularly without excessive absences; maintains assigned work schedule.

Care of Equipment: City equipment is properly used and cared for.

Safety Awareness: Practices rules of safety to protect self and others.

Productivity: Makes effective use of time/resources to accomplish assignments and meet deadlines.

Professional Appearance: Attire and grooming is appropriate for the work unit/organization.

Professionalism: Represents the organization in a professional manner.

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__ __ __ __

__ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __

__ __ __ __ __ __ __

__ __ __ __ __ __ __ __

__ __ __ __ __ __

__ __ __ __ __ __ __

-- --

__ __ __ __ __ __ __ __

__ __ __ __ __ __ __

EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE REPORTEMPLOYEE REPORTING PERIOD

THROUGH CLASS TITLE DEPARTMENT DIVISION

RETURN TO PERSONNEL BY REASON FOR REPORT

Rate Each Sub-factor In A Group Before Rating The Group Factor As A Whole SUB-FACTOR RATINGS A - STRONG B - STANDARD

C - WEAK D – N/A

FACTOR RATINGS OUTSTANDING VERY SATISFACTORY SATISFACTORY UNSATISFACTORY IMPROVEMENT NEEDED UNSATISFACTORY UNACCEPTABLE

LIST AT LEAST ONE ITEM IN 9 AND 10 BELOW (MORE ARE DESIREABLE). COMMENT HOW EACH ITEM IN 9 CAN BE FURTHER UTILIZED. COMMENT HOW EACH ITEM IN 10 CAN BE FURTHER DEVELOPED.

(USE BACKSIDE OR ADDITIONAL SHEET IF NEEDED)

9. EMPLOYEE’S STRONGEST POINTS

1. QUANTITY AMOUNT OF WORK PERFORMED COMPLETION OF WORK ON SCHEDULE DOES FULL SHARE OF WORK

2. QUALITY ACCURACY NEATNESS OF WORK PRODUCT THOROUGHNESS ORGANIZATION OF WORK ORAL EXPRESSION WRITTEN EXPRESSION ANALYZING SITUATIONS ACCURATELY MAKING SOUND DECISIONS

10. AREAS FOR FURTHER DEVELOPMENT 3. DEPENDABILITY

OBSERVANCE OF WORK HOURS ATTENDANCE HEALTH AND PHYSICAL STAMINA WORKING WITHOUT CLOSE SUPERVISION NOT REPEATING MISTAKES COMPLIANCE WITH WORK INSTRUCTIONS

4. PERSONAL RELATIONS RELATIONS WITH FELLOW WORKERS RELATIONS WITH SUPERVISOR RELATIONS WITH OTHER DEPARTMENTAL PERSONNEL WORKING WITH THE PUBLIC SUPPORT FOR DEPARTMENTAL POLICIES RESPECT FOR CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION PERSONAL APPEARANCE

11. COMMENTS ARE MANDATORY ON ALL “UNSATISFACTORY-UNACCEPTABLE” AND “OUTSTANDING” RATINGS. ALL RECOMMENDATIONS FOR EMPLOYEE’S BENEFIT SHOULD BE LISTED HERE. INCLUDE ANY COMMENTS ON PROMOTION POTENTIAL AND ANY ITEM YOU FEEL HAS NOT BEEN ADEQUATELY COVERED.

5. ADAPTABILITY ACCEPTANCE OF NEW IDEAS AND METHODS PERFORMANCE IN NEW SITUATIONS PERFORMANCE IN UNUSUAL OR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS ACCEPTS RESPONSIBILITIES SEEKS RESPONSIBILITIES

6. SAFETY AND COST CONSCIOUSNESS OBSERVANCE OF PERSONAL SAFETY OBSERVANCE OF SAFETY FOR OTHERS CONTRIBUTING CONSTRUCTIVE SAFETY IDEAS RECOGNITION OF BUDGET CONTROLS USE OF TIME AND MATERIALS CARE OF EQUIPMENT

COMPLETE FOR SUPERVISORS ONLY 7. SUPERVISORY ABILITY ­

ADMINISTRATIVE UNDERSTANDING WORK OBJECTIVES 12. OVERALL EVALUATION:ABILITY TO GET WORK OUT OUTSTANDING PLANNING AND ASSIGNING WORK VERY SATISFACTORYDELEGATING AUTHORITY AND RESPONSIBILITY SATISFACTORYGIVING CLEAR INSTRUCTIONS UNSATISFACTORY-IMPROVEMENT NEEDED MAKING DECISIONS UNSATISFACTORY-UNACCEPTABLE BASING DECISIONS ON FACTS

EVALUATED BY DATE

8. SUPERVISORY ABILITY ­HUMAN RELATIONS

REVIEWED BY – DEPT. HEAD OR AUTH. REP. DATE

APPROACHABILITY BY SUBORTINATES REVIEWED BY EMPLOYEE DATE FAIRNESS AND IMPARTIALITY EFFECTIVENESS WITH MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL TRAINING AND DEVELOPING PERSONNEL MAINTAINING DISCIPLINE MAINTAINING MORALE

REVIEWED BY PERSONNEL DATE

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__ __ __ __

__ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __

__ __ __ __ __ __ __

__ __ __ __ __ __ __ __

__ __ __ __ __ __

__ __ __ __ __ __ __

-- --

__ __ __ __ __ __ __ __

__ __ __ __ __ __ __

EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE REPORTEMPLOYEE REPORTING PERIOD

THROUGH CLASS TITLE DEPARTMENT DIVISION

RETURN TO PERSONNEL BY REASON FOR REPORT

Rate Each Sub-factor In A Group Before Rating The Group Factor As A Whole SUB-FACTOR RATINGS A - STRONG B - STANDARD

C - WEAK D – N/A

FACTOR RATINGS OUTSTANDING VERY SATISFACTORY SATISFACTORY UNSATISFACTORY IMPROVEMENT NEEDED UNSATISFACTORY UNACCEPTABLE

LIST AT LEAST ONE ITEM IN 9 AND 10 BELOW (MORE ARE DESIREABLE). COMMENT HOW EACH ITEM IN 9 CAN BE FURTHER UTILIZED. COMMENT HOW EACH ITEM IN 10 CAN BE FURTHER DEVELOPED.

(USE BACKSIDE OR ADDITIONAL SHEET IF NEEDED)

9. EMPLOYEE’S STRONGEST POINTS

1. QUANTITY AMOUNT OF WORK PERFORMED COMPLETION OF WORK ON SCHEDULE DOES FULL SHARE OF WORK

2. QUALITY ACCURACY NEATNESS OF WORK PRODUCT THOROUGHNESS ORGANIZATION OF WORK ORAL EXPRESSION WRITTEN EXPRESSION ANALYZING SITUATIONS ACCURATELY MAKING SOUND DECISIONS

10. AREAS FOR FURTHER DEVELOPMENT 3. DEPENDABILITY

OBSERVANCE OF WORK HOURS ATTENDANCE HEALTH AND PHYSICAL STAMINA WORKING WITHOUT CLOSE SUPERVISION NOT REPEATING MISTAKES COMPLIANCE WITH WORK INSTRUCTIONS

4. PERSONAL RELATIONS RELATIONS WITH FELLOW WORKERS RELATIONS WITH SUPERVISOR RELATIONS WITH OTHER DEPARTMENTAL PERSONNEL WORKING WITH THE PUBLIC SUPPORT FOR DEPARTMENTAL POLICIES RESPECT FOR CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION PERSONAL APPEARANCE

11. COMMENTS ARE MANDATORY ON ALL “UNSATISFACTORY-UNACCEPTABLE” AND “OUTSTANDING” RATINGS. ALL RECOMMENDATIONS FOR EMPLOYEE’S BENEFIT SHOULD BE LISTED HERE. INCLUDE ANY COMMENTS ON PROMOTION POTENTIAL AND ANY ITEM YOU FEEL HAS NOT BEEN ADEQUATELY COVERED.

5. ADAPTABILITY ACCEPTANCE OF NEW IDEAS AND METHODS PERFORMANCE IN NEW SITUATIONS PERFORMANCE IN UNUSUAL OR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS ACCEPTS RESPONSIBILITIES SEEKS RESPONSIBILITIES

6. SAFETY AND COST CONSCIOUSNESS OBSERVANCE OF PERSONAL SAFETY OBSERVANCE OF SAFETY FOR OTHERS CONTRIBUTING CONSTRUCTIVE SAFETY IDEAS RECOGNITION OF BUDGET CONTROLS USE OF TIME AND MATERIALS CARE OF EQUIPMENT

COMPLETE FOR SUPERVISORS ONLY 7. SUPERVISORY ABILITY ­

ADMINISTRATIVE UNDERSTANDING WORK OBJECTIVES 12. OVERALL EVALUATION:ABILITY TO GET WORK OUT OUTSTANDING PLANNING AND ASSIGNING WORK VERY SATISFACTORYDELEGATING AUTHORITY AND RESPONSIBILITY SATISFACTORYGIVING CLEAR INSTRUCTIONS UNSATISFACTORY-IMPROVEMENT NEEDED MAKING DECISIONS UNSATISFACTORY-UNACCEPTABLE BASING DECISIONS ON FACTS

EVALUATED BY DATE

8. SUPERVISORY ABILITY ­HUMAN RELATIONS

REVIEWED BY – DEPT. HEAD OR AUTH. REP. DATE

APPROACHABILITY BY SUBORTINATES REVIEWED BY EMPLOYEE DATE FAIRNESS AND IMPARTIALITY EFFECTIVENESS WITH MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL TRAINING AND DEVELOPING PERSONNEL MAINTAINING DISCIPLINE MAINTAINING MORALE

REVIEWED BY PERSONNEL DATE

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City of Orinda Employee Performance Evaluation Employee Self Evaluation Employee: ____________________________________________________ Position: ______________________________________________________ Department: ___________________________________________________ Instructions: Please respond to each of the following sections as indicated on this form. If there is not enough room provided to complete your response, you may continue on an additional sheet of paper. Be sure to return this Self-Evaluation prior to your scheduled date of evaluation. If you have any questions or concerns, check with Human Resources. I. Evaluate how well you have accomplished your objectives during the current evaluation period. Objective: ___________________________________________________________________ Evaluation: __________________________________________________________________ Objective: ____________________________________________________________________ Evaluation: __________________________________________________________________ Objective: ____________________________________________________________________ Evaluation: ___________________________________________________________________ Objective: ____________________________________________________________________ Evaluation: ___________________________________________________________________ Objective: ____________________________________________________________________ Evaluation:____________________________________________________________________ Objective: _____________________________________________________________________ Evaluation:____________________________________________________________________ Objective: ____________________________________________________________________ Evaluation: ___________________________________________________________________ Objective: ____________________________________________________________________ Evaluation: ____________________________________________________________________

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II. What other accomplishments have you completed during the current evaluation period? __________________________________________________________________________ III. Suggest career development goals that could help improve your performance (that is, training, education, special courses, specific work experience, etc.); please be specific. _____________________________________________________________________________ IV. Suggest how your work setting, your department, or the Orinda organization as a whole could help you improve and be more productive on the job. _______________________________________________________________________________ V. List your future objectives for the next evaluation period. Objective: ________________________________________________________________________ Objective:________________________________________________________________________ Objective:______________________________________________________________________ Objective: _____________________________________________________________________ Self-Evaluation Summary - Other Comments: _______________________________________________________________________________

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EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

CONFIDENTIAL This form should be typed and must be handled in a confidential and professional manner.

Page 1 of 5Revised 3/22/13

Employee Name (Last, First, MI)

Date of Hire Rating Period

From:

Job Title: To:

Type of Appraisal

Probationary

Completion of Probation

Annual

SpecialDept: Division:Ratings Comments

O = Outstanding - Requires Explanation E = Exceeds Standards M = Meets Standards N = Needs Improvement U = Unsatisfactory (Below Standard)

Ratings should include both written comments and/or individual ratings on each performance factor; however, any Needs Improvement or Unsatisfactory rating MUST be accompanied by an action plan to correct the deficiency. An Outstanding rating must be accompanied by factual evidence to substantiate this rating.

Considering all factors which might affect the employee's value to the organization, the overall rating of the Employee is: Select One

Summary Rating

Rating DefinitionsO = Outstanding: Employee demonstrated exceptional performance and made superior contributions. Use this rating sparingly to indicate extraordinary performance with achievements far in excess of job requirements.

E = Exceeds Standards: Employee performance is consistently above the standard expected of employees occupying the classification. Performance exceeds fulfillment of classification requirements.

M = Meets Standards: Employee performance consistently meets and fulfills the level or work expected as outlined in the classification description.

N = Needs Improvement: Employee performance does not meet one or more of the performance goals or major responsibilities defined in the classification description. Use this rating to indicate areas requiring improvement. This rating must be accompanied by an action plan, or a Performance Improvement Plan, where applicable.

U = Unsatisfactory: Employee performance reveals serious problems and is frequently below expectations. This rating must be accompanied by factual evidence to substantiate the rating and a plan to correct deficiencies (Performance Improvement Plan) and achieve required results, as failure to do so may lead to disciplinary action.

The City's Vision Statement: We are an organization of dedicated professionals working together to make Brentwood the very best, preserving its rich heritage and keeping Brentwood in the hearts of the people.

Mission Statement: Bringing Brentwood's vision to reality.

Core Values: Integrity, Passion, Accountability, Respect, and Quality serve as essential tools by which to measure employee performance in the delivery of services to those we serve. Performance evaluations should include reference to how these Core Values are demonstrated by staff. A complete list of our Core Values may be viewed on the City's Intranet.

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EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

CONFIDENTIAL This form should be typed and must be handled in a confidential and professional manner.

Page 2 of 5Revised 3/22/13

Employee Name:

Reviewer:

I have explained this report to the employee and attest that the information contained herein is based on my observation and knowledge, which represents my best judgment of the employee's performance.

Signature of Reviewer Date

Division Head (or designee): I have reviewed this report. (Where applicable.) Comments (where applicable):

Signature Date

Dept. Director (or designee): I have reviewed this report. Director comments (where applicable):

Signature Date

Employee:

I have had this evaluation explained to me.

I wish to attach an addendum to this evaluation.

Employee Confirmation:

I understand that there are various reporting methods available to me in the event I feel that I have either experienced or witnessed a hostile work environment including, but not limited to, sexual harassment within my department. Reporting methods available to me include, but are not limited to: calling the Employee Protection Line (800) 576-5262, City I.D. 10079; notifying my supervisor; and/or notifying the Human Resources Department or Assistant City Manager.

My initials indicate that I have read the statement above and that I am aware of the various reporting methods available to me.

____________ (Employee initials)

DateSignature of Employee

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Empl

oyee

Nam

e:

EM

PLO

YE

E P

ER

FOR

MA

NC

E E

VA

LU

AT

ION

CO

NFI

DEN

TIA

L Th

is fo

rm sh

ould

be

type

d an

d m

ust b

e ha

ndle

d in

a c

onfid

entia

l and

pro

fess

iona

l man

ner.

Page

3 o

f 5R

evis

ed 3

/22/

13

A. T

EA

M C

ON

TR

IBU

TIO

NPe

rfor

man

ce D

eliv

ered

(Fac

ts)

Rat

ing

(O, E

, M, N

, U)

1. Id

entif

ies a

nd p

rovi

des c

onst

ruct

ive

sugg

estio

ns o

r as

sist

ance

to o

ther

em

ploy

ees o

r dep

artm

ents

to im

prov

e ef

ficie

ncy

and

effe

ctiv

enes

s tha

t sup

ports

the

conc

ept o

f on

e or

gani

zatio

n.

Se

lect

One

2. A

bilit

y to

wor

k co

oper

ativ

ely

and

colla

bora

tivel

y w

ith

othe

rs.

Sele

ct O

ne

Ove

rall

Rat

ing

for

this

Sec

tion:

Sele

ct O

ne

B.

CO

MM

UN

ICA

TIO

NPe

rfor

man

ce D

eliv

ered

(Fac

ts)

Rat

ing

(O, E

, M, N

, U)

1. P

lace

s a h

igh

prio

rity

on c

usto

mer

serv

ice;

dem

onst

rate

s ab

ility

to re

cogn

ize

the

need

s of i

nter

nal a

nd e

xter

nal

cust

omer

s and

mee

ts th

e st

anda

rd fo

r tim

elin

ess a

nd

follo

w th

roug

h.Se

lect

One

2. C

omm

unic

ates

in a

pro

fess

iona

l, cl

ear,

resp

ectfu

l and

in

form

ativ

e m

anne

r, bo

th o

rally

and

in w

ritin

g, a

nd

liste

ns o

penl

y an

d re

spec

tfully

to o

ther

s.Se

lect

One

Ove

rall

Rat

ing

for

this

Sec

tion:

Sele

ct O

ne

C.

JOB

KN

OW

LE

DG

E, C

OM

PET

EN

CY

, TR

AIN

ING

A

ND

DE

VE

LO

PME

NT

Perf

orm

ance

Del

iver

ed (F

acts

)R

atin

g (O

, E, M

, N, U

)

1. E

xhib

its se

lf-in

itiat

ive

in p

erfo

rmin

g as

sign

ed d

utie

s an

d in

fulfi

lling

resp

onsi

bilit

ies w

ith m

inim

um

inst

ruct

ion;

take

s ini

tiativ

e to

obt

ain

job-

rela

ted

train

ing

to st

ay c

urre

nt o

n te

chni

cal a

nd p

rofe

ssio

nal

info

rmat

ion.

Sele

ct O

ne

2. P

osse

sses

an

acce

ptab

le le

vel o

f tec

hnic

al k

now

ledg

e,

skill

s and

abi

litie

s to

perf

orm

the

esse

ntia

l dut

ies o

f thi

s po

sitio

n.Se

lect

One

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Empl

oyee

Nam

e:

EM

PLO

YE

E P

ER

FOR

MA

NC

E E

VA

LU

AT

ION

CO

NFI

DEN

TIA

L Th

is fo

rm sh

ould

be

type

d an

d m

ust b

e ha

ndle

d in

a c

onfid

entia

l and

pro

fess

iona

l man

ner.

Page

4 o

f 5R

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ed 3

/22/

13

3. A

dher

es to

wor

k ru

les a

nd p

olic

ies a

s def

ined

by

City

/D

epar

tmen

t man

uals

; dem

onst

rate

s kno

wle

dge

of

polic

ies a

nd p

roce

dure

s per

tain

ing

to th

e ap

plic

able

job

desc

riptio

n an

d se

eks c

larif

icat

ion

whe

n un

certa

in.

Sele

ct O

ne

4. A

ttend

s req

uire

d tra

inin

g se

ssio

ns; d

emon

stra

tes l

earn

ed

skill

s by

shar

ing

know

ledg

e w

hile

per

form

ing

task

s;

take

s ini

tiativ

e to

trai

n or

supp

ort c

o-w

orke

rs a

s nee

ded.

Sele

ct O

ne

Ove

rall

Rat

ing

for

this

Sec

tion:

Sele

ct O

ne

D. Q

UA

LIT

Y, Q

UA

NT

ITY

, WO

RK

HA

BIT

S,

LE

AD

ER

SHIP

Perf

orm

ance

Del

iver

ed (F

acts

)R

atin

g (O

, E, M

, N, U

)

1. M

anag

es ti

me

effe

ctiv

ely

and

effic

ient

ly to

acc

ompl

ish

wor

k as

sign

men

ts a

ccur

atel

y an

d w

ithin

the

esta

blis

hed

timel

ines

.Se

lect

One

2. E

xhib

its w

illin

gnes

s and

an

abili

ty to

util

ize

new

ap

proa

ches

to e

nhan

ce jo

b pe

rfor

man

ce.

Sele

ct O

ne

3. T

akes

an

activ

e ro

le in

iden

tifyi

ng a

nd re

solv

ing

prob

lem

s and

in m

akin

g cl

ear,

reas

oned

dec

isio

ns; h

elps

m

ake

deci

sion

s and

reso

lve

conf

licts

at l

owes

t lev

el a

nd

focu

ses o

n fa

cts n

ot p

erso

nalit

ies.

Sele

ct O

ne

4. C

arrie

s out

supe

rvis

or's

inst

ruct

ions

to e

ffec

tivel

y ac

com

plis

h w

ork

assi

gnm

ents

and

follo

w th

roug

h on

co

mm

itmen

ts a

nd ta

sks;

kee

ps su

perv

isor

ade

quat

ely

appr

ised

on

wor

k pr

ogre

ss.

Sele

ct O

ne

5. P

rovi

des c

onst

ruct

ive

feed

back

whe

re a

pplic

able

and

as

appr

opria

te, a

nd id

entif

ies s

peci

fic a

ctio

ns to

be

take

n to

im

prov

e pe

rfor

man

ce.

Lead

s by

setti

ng p

ositi

ve

exam

ples

.Se

lect

One

Ove

rall

Rat

ing

for

this

Sec

tion:

Sele

ct O

ne

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Empl

oyee

Nam

e:

EM

PLO

YE

E P

ER

FOR

MA

NC

E E

VA

LU

AT

ION

CO

NFI

DEN

TIA

L Th

is fo

rm sh

ould

be

type

d an

d m

ust b

e ha

ndle

d in

a c

onfid

entia

l and

pro

fess

iona

l man

ner.

Page

5 o

f 5R

evis

ed 3

/22/

13

E.

AT

TE

ND

AN

CE

Perf

orm

ance

Del

iver

ed (F

acts

)R

atin

g (O

, E, M

, N, U

)

1. S

ched

ules

leav

e tim

e w

ith su

ffic

ient

not

ice

and

arra

nges

pr

oper

cov

erag

e w

here

nec

essa

ry.

Sele

ct O

ne

2. A

dher

es to

est

ablis

hed

wor

k ho

urs a

nd b

reak

per

iods

; re

ports

to m

eetin

gs a

nd tr

aini

ng o

n tim

e; c

ompl

ies w

ith

the

City

's at

tend

ance

pol

icy.

Sele

ct O

ne

3. S

ick

leav

e ho

urs u

sed

in c

alen

dar y

ears

in

clud

ed w

ithin

this

ratin

g pe

riod:

Se

lect

One

Ove

rall

Rat

ing

for

this

Sec

tion:

Sele

ct O

ne

F. S

AFE

TY

Pe

rfor

man

ce D

eliv

ered

(Fac

ts)

Rat

ing

(O, E

, M, N

, U)

1. P

artic

ipat

es in

and

com

plie

s with

City

/Dep

artm

ent

prov

ided

safe

ty tr

aini

ng; f

ollo

ws a

pplic

able

law

s, C

ity/

Dep

artm

ent p

olic

ies a

nd p

roce

dure

s, in

clud

ing

Inju

ry

and

Illne

ss P

reve

ntio

n Pl

an ("

IIPP

") re

late

d do

cum

ents

, an

d ac

cide

nt a

nd in

cide

nt re

porti

ng.

Sele

ct O

ne

2. P

ract

ices

and

pro

mot

es sa

fe b

ehav

ior i

n or

der t

o pr

even

t ac

cide

nts,

inju

ry o

r dam

age;

take

s im

med

iate

act

ion

to

corr

ect a

nd/o

r rep

ort u

nsaf

e ac

ts a

nd c

ondi

tions

.Se

lect

One

Ove

rall

Rat

ing

for

this

Sec

tion:

Sele

ct O

ne

AD

DIT

ION

AL

CO

MM

EN

TS:

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ADDITIONALINFORMATIONINCLUDINGPRESENTATION

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Stay Interview Questions

Stay interviews are conducted to help managers understand why employees stay and what might cause them to leave. In an effective stay interview, managers ask standard, structured questions in a casual and conversational manner. Most stay interviews take less than half an hour.

Opening the Interview

To open the stay interview, a manager may use the following (or similar) statements:

I would like to talk with you about the reasons you stay with the City so I understand what I might be able to do to make this a great place to work for you.

I’d like to have an informal talk with you to find out how the job is going so I can do my best to support you as your manager, particularly with issues within my control.

Questions

The following are questions you may ask during a stay interview. You should have several open-ended questions on hand. It’s important to listen and gather ideas from the employee about how you and your organization can retain him or her.

What do you look forward to when you come to work each day? What do you like most or least about working here? What keeps you working here? If you could change something about your job, what would that be? What would make your job more satisfying? How do you like to be recognized? What talents are not being used in your current role? What would you like to learn here? What motivates (or demotivates) you? What can I do to best support you? What can I do more of or less of as your manager? What might tempt you to leave?

Closing the Interview

To close the stay interview, summarize the key reasons the employee gave for staying or potentially leaving the organization, and work with the employee to develop a stay plan. Be sure to end on a positive note.

Examples of closing statements include:

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Let me summarize what I heard you say about the reasons you stay at the City as well as reasons you might leave. Then, let’s develop a plan to make this a great place for you to work.

I appreciate you sharing your thoughts with me today. I am committed to doing what I can to make this a great place for you to work.

- See more at: http://www.shrm.org/templatestools/samples/hrforms/pages/stayinterviewquestions.aspx#sthash.FU6z9UGj.dpuf

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2 0 1 6 CONTRA COSTA LOCA L GOVERNMENT L EADERSH I P ACADEMY

GROUP MEMBERS :

E X ECUT I V E S PONSORS :

Va l e r i e Ba ro n e , C i t y o f Con c o r d

Ken No rd ho f f , C i t y o f Wa l n u t C r e e k

F ra n Robu s t e l l i , C i t y o f Wa l nu t C r e e k

ALTERNATIVES TO THE PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

PROCESS

BobAtlas,CCCFPDTonyaGilmore,CityofOrindaJosieLondon,CityofMartinez

FrankLuna,CityofWalnutCreek

TimNielsen,CityofBrentwoodKristinPollot,CityofPittsburgRyanPursley,CityofConcordMicheleRodriguez,CityofSanPablo

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D O W E H A V E A P R O B L E M W I T H C O N V E N T I O N A L P E R F O R M A N C E E V A L U A T I O N S ?

T H E E F F E C T O F P E R F O R M A N C E E V A L U A T I O N S A N D I N C E N T I V E S O N E M P L O Y E E M O T I V A T I O N

A L T E R N A T I V E P E R F O R M A N C E E V A L U A T I O N B E S T P R A C T I C E S A N D R E C O M M E N D A T I O N S

W H A T D O E S C O A C H I N G L O O K L I K E ?

A C C O U N T A B I L I T Y A N D T E C H N O L O G Y

C A L L T O A C T I O N

ALTERNATIVES TO THE PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

PROCESS

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THE SHORTCOMINGS OF EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE EVALUATIONS (EPE)

Don’t assess the actual Performance

Most focus on the person – Performance is Output Quality, Volume, $ Value & Responsiveness.

Doesn’t address Diversity

Same appraisal form is applied to a large but not hom*ogeneous group of employees (i.e. all hourly, all exempts, all managers etc.).

Result = The assessment form does not fit the job.

Managers are not trained

Managers are not trained on how to assess and give honest feedback.

If the process includes a career development component, it is even more likely that managers will not know how to enhance the career path of their employees.

It is historical EPE’s are focused on capturing feedback about last year rather than on discussing

necessary changes to job and skill requirements that are necessitated by the organizational strategy.

Contribution by Dr. John Sullivan January 31, 2011TLNT – eremedia.com

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EMPLOYEE MOTIVATION

Adapted from Why Employees Stay by V. Flowers and C. Hughes July, 1973 – hbr.org

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EMPLOYEE MOTIVATION

Organizational conditions need to be compatible with employee’s values for working and living

INERTIA will propel most employees forward

A positive approach to managing INERTIA

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COACHING FOR EXCELLENCE

Benefits Active involvement Employee growth Employee Retention Being a good coach makes you a better manager

Stay Interview Process Personal involvement Feedback

Training Managers to Coach Changing to a new process takes time and education in order to be successful Discipline and pay discussions should be separate meetings from coaching sessions

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COACHING FOR GROWTH OPPORTUNITIES

Goal Setting Develop SMART Goals – Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant and Timely

improves employee alignment with organizational goals increases in employee engagement improves productivity

Growth Opportunities Tie to anticipated needs in the employee's current position and/or Focus on opportunities outside the current role and/or Look at the organization's anticipated needs and/or Focus on the employee's strengths, talents, and interests separately

from the current position

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WHAT DOES COACHING LOOK LIKE?

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Set the tone with positivity & show appreciation Stay Interview Components: Reviewed special interests/needs to keep employee

engaged/challenged Discussed flexibility needed for better effectiveness Highlight accomplishments outside the workplace Discussed long term career goals

Coaching Components: Reviewed best/worst parts of the last quarter Reviewed status of goals set during the last check-in Discussed support/feedback needed from management

COMPONENTS OF COACHING FOR EXCELLENCE

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Managers need to be taught how to coach and all employees need to be engaged.

Documentation is key! Mechanisms for ongoing documentation/accountability

include: SMART goals (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time-

bound) aligned with departmental goals or the overall organization's mission

Employee satisfaction surveys Ongoing manager & supervisor training Team ratings for managers Monthly engagement reports Technology

ACCOUNTABILITY

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TECHNOLOGY OPTIONS?

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CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS:Coaching for Excellence Program

The traditional evaluation process does not improve employee morale, or motivate them.

We recommend coaching and mentorship to increase employee engagement and promote professional development.

We are convinced performance management thru coaching is the key.

This approach does not apply to probationary, or performance improvement employees.

It can be combined with other innovative project-based Team models or succession planning.

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CALL TO ACTIONCoaching for Excellence Program

We believe in the Coaching Model! Recommend conducting a county-wide Coaching for

Excellence training:- Learn how to conduct the “Stay Interview”.- Be trained to coach and mentor the employee.

Roll-out a Coaching for Excellence pilot in each city. Consider phasing out traditional evaluations.

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RESOURCES AND REFERENCES

This PowerPoint presentation, research, articles and links to some options for coaching firms and performance management technology are available at the Contra Costa Local Government Leadership Academy website at the following web address:

http://www.contracostalocalgovtacademy.com/(This link can also be found on your handout)

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QUESTIONS?

ALTERNATIVES TO THE PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

PROCESS

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Municipal Resources Group Conference Call (2-19-16) – Key Takeaways MRG has traditionally worked with governmental organizations, but over the past several years has been expanding their list of clients to include private employers. Background

- Both employers and employee groups are moving toward a general mistrust of the usefulness of traditional employee evaluations.

- Between 35% and 40% of employers links salary to evaluations. - Even outside of compensation discussion, real-time coaching within the work environment is

extremely valuable. Implementation and Accountability

- In order for a move toward a coaching model to be successful, the leadership of an organization must be fully invested. To help with this buy-in, there are quantifiable benefits of moving toward a coaching model and a culture of trust.

- Organizations and individuals will both befit from enhanced personal relationships between staff and supervisors, which will in turn improve the work product and efficiencies.

- Employee engagement/encouragement will also improve the workplace environment and work product.

- There are a number of apps available on the market to help organizations document coaching check-ins, as well as more formal goal-setting, reflection, and evaluation sessions.

- Decision-makers will want and need to see some kind of accountability built into the system, which can be accomplished through both technological tools (apps), but more importantly through initial and ongoing refresher training for supervisory and managerial staff.

- 3 elements necessary to bring about a change to the evaluation process: o Technical skills are important – teaching coaching skills to supervisors and managers. o There has to be a plan for change management – how will resistance to a new

coaching/self-management approach be handled. This is the most important of the three elements, in that you are dealing most closely with how employees feel and work on a day-to-day basis.

o Managing project staff, communication, and timeline of implementation. - Even organizations that traditionally test (at least partially) on some sort of performance metric,

such as Fire and Police services, benefit from the coaching approach, as it can stand side-by-side with the performance metric testing.

MRG was going to check with Walnut Creek and forward their contracted work plan to us if Fran was agreeable. This would be valuable to us as an outline of a possible implementation process.

General Discussion/Theory

- These types of coaching environments are most successful due to consistencies in how the techniques are applied by supervisors and managers across the organization. Check-in technology is available and vital in ensuring consistent application and direction.

- Training efforts on how to coach and be coached for new employees should begin with the orientation efforts, or even possibly be built into the recruitment process.

- Organizations need to be cognizant that an absence of feedback creates a performance void.

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- One of the strongest objections comes from attorneys who say that evaluations are necessary to create a paper trail should discipline become necessary. In fact, most performance evaluations do not document poor performance, rather the record has to be created before termination can take place. Implementation of a coaching-based approach would not cause most organizations to change how they are currently operating in this regard.

Objectives of Performance Evaluations: 1. Employee development/goals 2. Employee engagement 3. Feedback for employee and organization

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